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In 2006 over 60% of medical graduates in the UK were female, and the number of women going to medical school as 'mature students' is steadily increasing. Some of these women will, at some point, choose to have a baby, but the question always asked is how to fit it in with a medical career? Along with the problem of finding time to actually have a baby, and coping as a pregnant doctor, there is the problem of finding information when it is most needed. This book addresses this problem, bringing a wealth of information together in one easy-to-use resource. Written by a mother, who has faced the joys and frustrations of combining medicine and being a mother, this book is a "one-stop-shop" for all mothers and mums-to-be.
Everything They Don't Tell You, Everything You Need to Know Becoming a doctor is so much more than acing your MCATs, living through med school, then getting the perfect residency. It is a career that demands long hours on little to no sleep, constant continuing education, and a tough decision about which of the many types of medicine you want to practice. But with the right guide, you can make the right choices each step of the way. On Becoming a Doctor calmly and thoroughly walks you through each academic, physical, and emotional step you'll take on your way to a successful career in medicine, and it includes interviews with many different specialists to help you choose a medical path. This Essential Insider Advice Will Show You: Financing all of the costs of medical school The ups and downs of working with insurance companies Perspectives on a variety of medical fields The educational, physical, and emotional realities of the journey Interviews with doctors in many different specialties Working with other doctors and the administration On Becoming a Doctor covers everything you need to know about medical school, residency, specialization, and practice.
A real-life pediatric emergency room doctor reveals the trials, heartbreaks, and triumphs of his work. It's a place of intense human drama, life's highest hopes and deepest despairs. A place we rarely get to see through a doctor's eyes. But now the emergency room at a children's hospita is revealed in a moving and personal notembook by William Bondio, MD. It recounts the lessons a doctor learns beyond the textbooks, revealing insights into the human condition at its most vulnerable and courageous moments--from the patient who, after intense medical therapy, gives up the will to live, to the sick newborn baby who never would. We feel the power of a mother's instinct to advocate for her handicapped child, and observe the wisdom of an immigrant father who intuitively senses things the doctors cannot. Finally, with the mother of a young patient named Julia we share in the nobility of a parent's unending search to find meaning in tragedy.
The author of the highly acclaimed Overdiagnosed describes seven widespread assumptions that encourage excessive, often ineffective, and sometimes harmful medical care. You might think the biggest problem in medical care is that it costs too much. Or that health insurance is too expensive, too uneven, too complicated—and gives you too many forms to fill out. But the central problem is that too much medical care has too little value. Dr. H. Gilbert Welch is worried about too much medical care. It’s not to deny that some people get too little medical care, rather that the conventional concern about “too little” needs to be balanced with a concern about “too much”: too many people being made to worry about diseases they don’t have—and are at only average risk to get; too many people being tested and exposed to the harmful effects of the testing process; too many people being subjected to treatments they don’t need—or can’t benefit from. The American public has been sold the idea that seeking medical care is one of the most important steps to maintain wellness. Surprisingly, medical care is not, in fact, well correlated with good health. So more medicine does not equal more health; in reality the opposite may be true. The general public harbors assumptions about medical care that encourage overuse, assumptions like it’s always better to fix the problem, sooner (or newer) is always better, or it never hurts to get more information. Less Medicine, More Health pushes against established wisdom and suggests that medical care can be too aggressive. Drawing on his twenty-five years of medical practice and research, Dr. Welch notes that while economics and lawyers contribute to the excesses of American medicine, the problem is essentially created when the general public clings to these powerful assumptions about the value of tests and treatments—a number of which are just plain wrong. By telling fascinating (and occasionally amusing) stories backed by reliable data, Dr. Welch challenges patients and the health-care establishment to rethink some very fundamental practices. His provocative prescriptions hold the potential to save money and, more important, improve health outcomes for us all.
Michelle Au started medical school armed only with a surfeit of idealism, a handful of old ER episodes for reference, and some vague notion about "helping people." This Won't Hurt a Bit is the story of how she grew up and became a real doctor. It's a no-holds-barred account of what a modern medical education feels like, from the grim to the ridiculous, from the heartwarming to the obscene. Unlike most medical memoirs, however, this one details the author's struggles to maintain a life outside of the hospital, in the small amount of free time she had to live it. And, after she and her husband have a baby early in both their medical residencies, Au explores the demands of being a parent with those of a physician, two all-consuming jobs in which the lives of others are very literally in her hands. Au's stories range from hilarious to heartbreaking and hit every note in between, proving more than anything that the creation of a new doctor (and a new parent) is far messier, far more uncertain, and far more gratifying than one could ever expect.
Nobody told you how difficult it would be to date a medical student. Your partner endures long hours, endless exams, and unpredictable clinical rotations. They learn to speak a different language and are asked to dedicate themselves to training with single-minded focus. And you? You work hard to pursue your goals while taking care of yourself and your relationship. I wish somebody had told me what to expect and how to maintain a happy, healthy relationship while dating a medical student. Nobody told me those things, but I'm here to tell you. I scoured research about medical couples, interviewed almost two dozen other medical partners, and drew from my experiences to bring you this book. How do successful medical couples do it? I'll show you. Lear how to... -Contend with medical school's demanding, unpredictable schedule -Avoid medical couples' most common pitfalls and arguments -Build robust support systems and reframe time spent alone -Build new communication habits and utilize the power of small gestures -Pursue your goals and support your partner. You've struggled long enough. It's time to improve your relationship.

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