Download Free State Liability In Tort A Comparative Law Study Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online State Liability In Tort A Comparative Law Study and write the review.

This book examines financial compensation for wrongs committed by public bodies including medical negligence, educational errors, child abuse by local authority carers, and police misconduct. Recent English cases are analysed and compared with European decisions. Explanation is given of ways of gaining compensation outside the courts, through complaints-procedures, ombudsmen, and statutory schemes.
Vicarious liability is controversial: a principle of strict liability in an area dominated by fault-based liability. By making an innocent party pay compensation for the torts of another, it can also appear unjust. Yet it is a principle found in all Western legal systems, be they civil law or common law. Despite uncertainty as to its justifications, it is accepted as necessary. In our modern global economy, we are unlikely to understand its meaning and rationale through study of one legal system alone. Using her considerable experience as a comparative tort lawyer, Paula Giliker examines the principle of vicarious liability (or, to a civil lawyer, liability for the acts of others) in England and Wales, Australia, Canada, France and Germany, and with reference to legal systems in countries such as the United States, New Zealand and Spain.
Comparative Tort Law: Global Perspectives provides a framework for analyzing and understanding the current state of tort law in most of the world's legal systems. The book examines tort law theories and cultures through a comparative methodology. It l
Today there are more than 2,500 bilateral investment treaties (BITs) around the world. Most of these investment protection treaties offer foreign investors a direct cause of action to claim damages against host-states before international arbitral tribunals. This procedure, together with the requirement of compensation in indirect expropriations and the fair and equitable treatment standard, have transformed the way we think about state liability in international law. We live in the BIT generation, a world where BITs define the scope and conditions according to which states are economically accountable for the consequences of regulatory change and administrative action. Investment arbitration in the BIT generation carries new functions which pose unprecedented normative challenges, such as the arbitral bodies established to resolve investor/state disputes defining the relationship between property rights and the public interest. They also review state action for arbitrariness, and define the proper tests under which that review should proceed. State Liability in Investment Treaty Arbitration is an interdisciplinary work, aimed at academics and practitioners, which focuses on five key dimensions of BIT arbitration. First, it analyses the past practice of state responsibility for injuries to aliens, placing the BIT generation in historical perspective. Second, it develops a descriptive law-and-economics model that explains the proliferation of BITs, and why they are all worded so similarly. Third, it addresses the legitimacy deficits of this new form of dispute settlement, weighing its potential advantages and democratic shortfalls. Fourth, it gives a comparative overview of the universal tension between property rights and the public interest, and the problems and challenges associated with liability grounded in illegal and arbitrary state action. Finally, it presents a detailed legal study of the current state of BIT jurisprudence regarding indirect expropriations and the fair and equitable treatment clause.
This book examines the law of product liability from a comparative perspective. With the European Directive on Product Liability enacted over 20 years ago, this publication analyses the state of product liability in a number of key jurisdictions including both Western European countries and New Member States. Account is also taken of developments further afield, including the United States and Japan. Distinguished contributors, including a high court judge, European Commission official, leading litigators and academics, provide individual country reports and a number of integrated comparative studies. The book is designed for practical use by legal practitioners, academics, students and others interested in the area of contract, tort, civil procedure and multi-party litigation. In particular, practitioners will find the country reports an essential reference point.
In recent decades, the liability of public authorities has been one of the main areas of devel-opment in tort law in Europe, with major reforms implemented or considered at a national level, and a steady stream of major court decisions. During the same period, 'Member State liability' has also been recognised in the law of the EU, and the interplay of principles of national and EU law - and additionally the 'just satisfaction' jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights - evidently warrants close attention. In this context, the aims of the present study are to contribute to the understanding of the law of extra-contractual liability as it applies to public authorities in the legal systems of Europe (and selected non-European jurisdictions), to facilitate its enhancement where necessary or desirable, and to consider the possibilities for harmonisation in the area - specifically, through the extension and adaptation of the Principles of European Tort Law to cover public authority liability. With contributions by Bjarte Askeland, Ewa Baginska, Jonathan Cardi, Giovanni Comande, Eugenia Dacoronia, Isabelle Durant, Duncan Fairgrieve, Michael G Faure, Israel Gilead, Michael D Green, Anne LM Keirse, Bernhard A Koch, Francois Lichere, Piotr Machnikow-ski, Ulrich Magnus, Miquel Marti­n-Casals, Jef de Mot, Johann Neethling, Luca Nocco, Ken Oliphant, Maria Jose Reis Rangel de Mesquita, Jordi Ribot, Lubos Tichy, Vibe Ulfbeck, Pierre Widmer, Benedict Winiger.
The Research Handbook on EU Tort Law focuses on the study of the law of tort/delict/non-contractual liability of the European Union and examines the institutional liability of the EU, Francovich liability, and liability arising from a variety of EU secondary legislation (directives/regulations). The impact of EU tort law on national legal systems is wide-ranging, covering areas such as consumer law, competition law, data protection law, employment law, insurance law and financial services law. It also discusses the potential development of a European culture of tort law and harmonisation. This comprehensive Research Handbook contains contributions from leading authors in their field, representing a cross-section of European jurisdictions. It offers an authoritative reference point for academics, students and practitioners studying or working in this field, but one which is also accessible for those approaching the subject for the first time.

Best Books

DMCA - Contact