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Analytic procedures suitable for the study of human disease are scattered throughout the statistical and epidemiologic literature. Explanations of their properties are frequently presented in mathematical and theoretical language. This well-established text gives readers a clear understanding of the statistical methods that are widely used in epidemiologic research without depending on advanced mathematical or statistical theory. By applying these methods to actual data, Selvin reveals the strengths and weaknesses of each analytic approach. He combines techniques from the fields of statistics, biostatistics, demography and epidemiology to present a comprehensive overview that does not require computational details of the statistical techniques described. For the Third Edition, Selvin took out some old material (e.g. the section on rarely used cross-over designs) and added new material (e.g. sections on frequently used contingency table analysis). Throughout the text he enriched existing discussions with new elements, including the analysis of multi-level categorical data and simple, intuitive arguments that exponential survival times cause the hazard function to be constant. He added a dozen new applied examples to illustrate such topics as the pitfalls of proportional mortality data, the analysis of matched pair categorical data, and the age-adjustment of mortality rates based on statistical models. The most important new feature is a chapter on Poisson regression analysis. This essential statistical tool permits the multivariable analysis of rates, probabilities and counts.
Based on Kahn's An Introduction to Epidemiological Methods (Oxford, 1983), this book contains a wealth of new material, including a substantially expanded discussion of the statistical concepts and methods fundamental to epidemiology.
The Handbook of Epidemiology provides a comprehensive overview of the field and thus bridges the gap between standard textbooks of epidemiology and dispersed publications. It includes topics that are usually missing in standard textbooks and that are only marginally represented in the specific literature as well as innovative areas. There is no competing book at this level. The handbook reviews the key issues and methodological approaches pertinent to the field for which the reader pursues an expatiated overview. It thus serves both as a first orientation for the interested reader and as a starting point for an in-depth study of a specific area, as well as a quick reference and recapitulatory overview for the expert. Each chapter is written by one or more leading scientists and represents the state-of-the-art knowledge.
This book combines applied and theoretical approaches to the analysis of epidemiologic issues. It goes beyond elementary material to deal with real problems generated by disease data, and delves into less usual areas such as the analysis of spatial distributions, survival data, proportional hazards regression, and "computer-intensive" approaches to statistical estimation. Each method discussed in the text is illustrated with examples which include complete sets of data. Using actual data demonstrates the strengths and weaknesses of different analytic approaches in describing a disease process. The goal of the book is to allow the reader to develop a clear understanding of analytic approaches to problems in epidemiologic data analysis without relying on sophisticated mathematics and advanced statistical theory. For the Second Edition a new chapter on the analysis of matched data has been added. This covers both discrete and continuous outcomes and explains both the classic analytic approach and the conditional logistic regression model. New sections have also been added on contingency table data, misclassification, and additive models underlying tabular data. In all the chapters there are new applications and other revisions that make this Second Edition a clearer and more helpful exposition of the way statistical tools are used to analyze epidemiologic data.
Clinical trials are used to elucidate the most appropriate preventive, diagnostic, or treatment options for individuals with a given medical condition. Perhaps the most essential feature of a clinical trial is that it aims to use results based on a limited sample of research participants to see if the intervention is safe and effective or if it is comparable to a comparison treatment. Sample size is a crucial component of any clinical trial. A trial with a small number of research participants is more prone to variability and carries a considerable risk of failing to demonstrate the effectiveness of a given intervention when one really is present. This may occur in phase I (safety and pharmacologic profiles), II (pilot efficacy evaluation), and III (extensive assessment of safety and efficacy) trials. Although phase I and II studies may have smaller sample sizes, they usually have adequate statistical power, which is the committee's definition of a "large" trial. Sometimes a trial with eight participants may have adequate statistical power, statistical power being the probability of rejecting the null hypothesis when the hypothesis is false. Small Clinical Trials assesses the current methodologies and the appropriate situations for the conduct of clinical trials with small sample sizes. This report assesses the published literature on various strategies such as (1) meta-analysis to combine disparate information from several studies including Bayesian techniques as in the confidence profile method and (2) other alternatives such as assessing therapeutic results in a single treated population (e.g., astronauts) by sequentially measuring whether the intervention is falling above or below a preestablished probability outcome range and meeting predesigned specifications as opposed to incremental improvement.
A summary of the epidemiology of human cancer.
The basis for much of medical public health practice comes from epidemiological research. This text describes current statistical tools that are used to analyze the association between possible risk factors and the actual risk of disease. Beginning with a broad conceptual framework on the disease process, it describes commonly used techniques for analyzing proportions and disease rates. These are then extended to model fitting, and the common threads of logic that bind the two analytic strategies together are revealed. Each chapter provides a descriptive rationale for the method, a worked example using data from a published study, and an exercise that allows the reader to practice the technique. Each chapter also includes an appendix that provides further details on the theoretical underpinnings of the method. Among the topics covered are Mantel-Haenszel methods, rates, survival analysis, logistic regression, and generalized linear models. Methods for incorporating aspects of study design, such as matching, into the analysis are discussed, and guidance is given for determining the power or the sample size requirements of a study. This text will give readers a foundation in applied statistics and the concepts of model fitting to develop skills in the analysis of epidemiological data.

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