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Over a million copies sold Clear writing is the key to clear thinking. So think what you want to say, then say it as simply as possible. That's the thinking that underpins this much-loved guide, and the mantra for anyone wanting to communicate with the clarity, style and precision for which The Economist is renowned. The Economist Style Guide guides the reader through the pleasures and pitfalls of English usage. It offers advice on the consistent use of punctuation, abbreviations and capital letters, identifies common errors and clichs and contains an exhaustive range of reference material - covering everything from business ratios to mathematical symbols and common Latin phrases. It also tackles the key differences between British and American English. But this is no ordinary guide to English usage. It has a wit, verve and flair which make it much more than a simple work of reference. Here are just some examples: - anticipate does not mean expect. Jack and Jill expected to marry; if they anticipated marriage, only Jill might find herself expectant. - Take care with between. To fall between two stools, however painful, is grammatically acceptable. To fall between the cracks is to challenge the laws of physics. - critique is a noun. If you want a verb, try criticise. - use words with care. If This door is alarmed, does its hair stand on end? The Economist Style Guide is required reading for anyone who wants to communicate with style.
This expanded twelfth edition of the bestselling guide to style is based on The Economist's own updated house style manual, and is an invaluable companion for everyone who wants to communicate with the clarity, style and precision for which The Economist is renowned. As the introduction says, 'clarity of writing usually follows clarity of thought.' The Economist Style Guide gives general advice on writing, points out common errors and clichés, offers guidance on consistent use of punctuation, abbreviations and capital letters and contains an exhaustive range of reference material--covering everything from accountancy ratios and stock market indices to laws of nature and science. Some of the numerous useful rules and common mistakes pointed out in the guide include: Which informs, that defines. This is the house that Jack built. But: This house, which Jack built, is now falling down. Discreet means circumspect or prudent; discrete means separate or distinct. Remember that "Questions are never indiscreet. Answers sometimes are" (Oscar Wilde). Flaunt means display, flout means disdain. If you flout this distinction you will flaunt your ignorance. Forgo means do without; forego means go before. Fortuitous means accidental, not fortunate or well-timed. Times: Take care. Three times more than X is four times as much as X. Full stops: Use plenty. They keep sentences short. This helps the reader.
A style guide that's both useful and fun to read, from the highly respected stylists at The Economist. Containing concise, witty guidelines on everything from what "pristine" really means to the elegant use of metaphors, this guide will benefit business writers with true style and anyone who wants to write well. Line drawings.
Offers general advice on writing, points out common errors and cliches, offers guidance on consistent use of punctuation, abbreviations and capital letters, and contains a range of reference material - covering topics ranging from accountancy ratios and stock market indices to laws of nature and science. [http://www.payot.ch/].
Over a million copies soldClear writing is the key to clear thinking. So think what you want to say, then say it as simply as possible.That's the thinking that underpins this much-loved guide, and the mantra for anyone wanting to communicate with the clarity, style and precision for which The Economist is renowned. The Economist Style Guide guides the reader through the pleasures and pitfalls of English usage. It offers advice on the consistent use of punctuation, abbreviations and capital letters, identifies common errors and clichés and contains an exhaustive range of reference material - covering everything from business ratios to mathematical symbols and common Latin phrases. It also tackles the key differences between British and American English. But this is no ordinary guide to English usage. It has a wit, verve and flair which make it much more than a simple work of reference. Here are just some examples: - anticipate does not mean expect. Jack and Jill expected to marry; if they anticipated marriage, only Jill might find herself expectant.- Take care with between. To fall between two stools, however painful, is grammatically acceptable. To fall between the cracks is to challenge the laws of physics.- critique is a noun. If you want a verb, try criticise.- use words with care. If This door is alarmed, does its hair stand on end? The Economist Style Guide is required reading for anyone who wants to communicate with style.
"Indispensable. The best guide of its type."—Bill Bryson With more than a half million copies sold to date globally,The Economist Style Guidehas become an esential tool for those who wish to write with the clarity, style, and precision for whichThe Economistis renowned. Now in a revised tenth edition, the guide is based on the house style manual ofThe Economist. It gives general advice on writing, points out common errors and clichés, and offers guidance on vocabulary, the proper use of punctuation and grammar, and much more. The guide includes a section the differences between American and British English and has a section of useful references.

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