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A concise and accessible examination of sustainability in a range of contemporary contexts, from economic development to government policy.
Now in a thoroughly revised and updated edition, this text offers a comprehensive discussion of the physical and human geography of the United States and Canada, weaving in the key themes of environment and sustainability throughout.
An accessible introduction to 3D printing that outlines the additive manufacturing process, industrial and household markets, and emerging uses. The use of 3D printing—digitally controlled additive manufacturing—is growing rapidly. Consumer models of 3D printers allow people to fabricate small plastic objects, from cabinet knobs to wedding cake toppers. Industrial uses are becoming widespread, as businesses use the technology to fabricate prototypes, spare parts, custom-fitted prosthetics, and other plastic or metal items, often at lower cost and with greater efficiency than standard manufacturing. In this volume in the MIT Press Essential Knowledge series, John Jordan offers an accessible introduction to 3D printing, describing the printing process, industrial and household markets, and emerging uses. Jordan outlines the stages of 3D printing, from idea to software model to a printable file that slices the planned object into printable layers to the finished object itself. He describes additive technologies, consumer 3D printing in homes and schools, mass customization (which can create tens of millions of unique items), and industrial uses. Jordan explains that although 3D printers have not become the ubiquitous home appliance once predicted, they are making inroads into mass markets; and he discusses the business factors that may hinder industry adoption of 3D printing technologies. He considers the possible unintended consequences of 3D printing on jobs, as companies scramble to find employees with an uncommon skill set; on business models and supply chains, as manufacturing is decentralized; and on patent law, as machines can be programmed to copy protected property. Finally, Jordan looks at new and emerging uses, including bioprinting, building construction, and micromachines.
The future is like an unwritten book. It is not something we see in a crystal ball, or can only hope to predict, like the weather. In this volume of the MIT Press's Essential Knowledge series, Nick Montfort argues that the future is something to be made, not predicted. Montfort offers what he considers essential knowledge about the future, as seen in the work of writers, artists, inventors, and designers (mainly in Western culture) who developed and described the core components of the futures they envisioned. Montfort's approach is not that of futurology or scenario planning; instead, he reports on the work of making the future -- the thinkers who devoted themselves to writing pages in the unwritten book. Douglas Engelbart, Alan Kay, and Ted Nelson didn't predict the future of computing, for instance. They were three of the people who made it. Montfort focuses on how the development of technologies -- with an emphasis on digital technologies -- has been bound up with ideas about the future. Readers learn about kitchens of the future and the vision behind them; literary utopias, from Plato's Republic to Edward Bellamy's Looking Backward and Charlotte Perkins Gilman's Herland; the Futurama exhibit at the 1939 New York World's Fair; and what led up to Tim Berners-Lee's invention of the World Wide Web. Montfort describes the notebook computer as a human-centered alterative to the idea of the computer as a room-sized "giant brain"; speculative practice in design and science fiction; and, throughout, the best ways to imagine and build the future.
A consumer's guide to the food system, from local to global: our part as citizens in the interconnected networks, institutions, and organizations that enable our food choices. Everybody eats. We may even consider ourselves experts on the topic, or at least Instagram experts. But are we aware that the shrimp in our freezer may be farmed and frozen in Vietnam, the grapes in our fruit bowl shipped from Chile, and the coffee in our coffee maker grown in Nicaragua, roasted in Germany, and distributed in Canada? Whether we know it or not, every time we shop for food, cook, and eat, we connect ourselves to complex supply networks, institutions, and organizations that enable our food choices. Even locavores may not know the whole story of the produce they buy at the farmers market. In this volume in the MIT Press Essential Knowledge series, food writer and scholar Fabio Parasecoli offers a consumer's guide to the food system, from local to global. Parasecoli describes a system made up of open-ended, shifting, and unstable networks rather than well-defined chains; considers healthy food and the contradictory advice about it consumers receive; discusses food waste and the implications for sustainability; explores food technologies (and "culinary luddism"); and examines hunger and food insecurity in both developing and developed countries. Parasecoli reminds us that we are not only consumers but also citizens, and as citizens we have more power to improve the food system than we do by our individual food choices.
This guide seeks to sort the flood of information written about environmental issues and sustainable societies in recent years and order it in some way. A total of 450 document abstracts are presented here, most of which are on books and think tank reports. These items first appeared in "Future Survey" (journal) and were published between 1991 and 1995. Many of these items focus on American issues; however, in most instances, both the problems and the proposed remedies may be of great relevance to other countries. The abstracts are grouped into three broad categories: (1) "Environmental Issues," in which the primary focus is on a particular problem or set of problems; (2) "Toward Sustainability," where the primary focus is on a sustainable society or some key aspect of it; and (3) "Politics and Planning," in which the focus is on political context, environmental critics, environmentalist groups, and actions to be taken at the global, national, regional, and local levels. A total of 170 periodicals related to the environment are also identified including two dozen general-interest publications, four dozen publications with an environmental focus, and 100 specialized environmental publications such as those devoted to soil conservation, waste disposal, environmental education or environmental politics. A publisher/title index and a subject index are also included. (PVD)
'It is no longer possible to practice, teach, or study purely domestic intellectual property law within Europe. European intellectual property norms now structure protection throughout the continent (and even beyond). Paradoxically, what might seem as a simplification of legal rules has created a maze of new complexities substantive, institutional and methodological. This collection by some of the leading scholars in European IP manages to capture that complexity without sacrificing clarity. Canvassing the entire field with a rich array of contributions, the book both highlights the roots of European IP law and asks important fundamental questions about where it is going. One can only hope that it is read by anyone with a hand in the future development of European IP law.' Graeme B. Dinwoodie, University of Oxford, UK 'Christophe Geiger has put together a very fine collection of essays by many of the very best scholars in European intellectual property law. The essays explore the basis, extent, as well as the successes and failings of regional harmonization of trade marks, geographical indications, copyright, designs, patents and remedies. The celebrated cast of authors naturally discuss, in addition to the various directives and regulations on each topic, the Treaty provisions on exhaustion of rights and competition (and their interpretation), relevant provisions on legislative competence, Article 17(2) of the Charter, other fundamental rights, and the growing case law of the Court of Justice. There is essential material here for anyone interested in European intellectual property law, as well as ideas for the improvement and further development of European IP law.' Lionel Bently, University of Cambridge, UK Constructing European Intellectual Property offers a comprehensive assessment of the current state of intellectual property legislation in Europe and gives direction on how an improved system might be achieved. This detailed study presents various perspectives on what further actions are necessary to provide the circumstances and tools for the construction of a truly balanced European intellectual property system. The book takes as its starting point that the ultimate aim of such a system should be to ensure sustainable and innovation-based economic growth while enhancing free circulation of ideas and cultural expressions. Being the first in the European Intellectual Property Institutes Network (EIPIN) series, this book lays down some concrete foundations for a deeper understanding of European intellectual property law and its complex interplay with other fields of jurisprudence as well as its impact on a broad array of spheres of social interaction. In so doing, it provides a well needed platform for further research. Academics, policymakers, lawyers and many others concerned with establishment of a regulatory framework for intangibles in the EU will benefit from the extensive and thoughtful discussion presented in this work.

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