Download Free Takings Private Property And The Power Of Eminent Domain Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Takings Private Property And The Power Of Eminent Domain and write the review.

If legal scholar Richard Epstein is right, then the New Deal is wrong, if not unconstitutional. Epstein develops a coherent normative theory that permits us to distinguish between permissible takings for public use and impermissible ones. He then examines a wide range of government regulations and taxes under a single comprehensive theory.
When governments use eminent domain to transfer property between private owners, Americans are outraged - or so most media and academic accounts would have us believe. But these accounts obscure a much more complex reality in American conceptions of property. In this book, Debbie Becher presents the first comprehensive study of a city's eminent domain acquisitions, exploring how and why the City of Philadelphia took properties between 1992 and 2007 and which takings led to protests. She uses original data - collected from city offices and interviews with over a hundred residents, business owners, community leaders, government representatives, attorneys, and appraisers - to explore how eminent domain really works. Becher surprises readers by finding that the city took over 4,000 private properties, or one out of every hundred such properties in Philadelphia, during her study period. Furthermore, these takings only rarely provoked opposition - a fact that established viewson property are ill-equipped to explain. To investigate how Americans judge the legitimacy of eminent domain, Becher devotes several chapters to two highly controversial sets of takings for redevelopment projects. The American Street takings were intended to win popular support for redevelopment and initially succeeded in doing so, but it ended as a near total failure and embarrassment. The Jefferson Square takings initially faced vociferous opposition, but they eventually earned residents'approval and became a political showpiece. Becher uncovers evidence that Americans judge eminent domain through a social conception of property as an investment of value, committed over time, that government is responsible for protecting. This conception has never been described in sociological, legal, political, or economic scholarship, and it stands in stark contrast to the arguments of libertarian and left-leaning activists and academics. But recognizing property as investment, Becher argues, may offer a firm new foundation for more progressive urban policies.
The contributors in this volume address the fundamental relationship between the state and its citizens, and among the people themselves. Discussion centers on a recent decision by the United States Supreme Court in the case of Kelo v. City of New London. This case involved the use of eminent domain power to acquire private property for purposes of transferring it by the State to another private party that would make "better" economic use of the land. This type of state action has been identified as an "economic development taking". In the Kelo case, the Court held that the action was legal within provisions of the US Constitution but the opinion was contentious among some of the Justices and has been met with significant negative outcry from the public. The Kelo case and the public debate arising in its aftermath give cause to assess the legal landscape related to the ability of government to fairly balance the tension between private property and the public interest. The tension and the need to successfully strike a balance are not unique to any one country or any one political system. From the United States to the United Kingdom, to the People's Republic of China, property and its legal regulation are of prime importance to matters of economic development and civic institution building. The Kelo decision, therefore, explores a rich set of legal principles with broad applicability.
The on-going battle between government's desire to regulate private property use and property owners' equally powerful desire to avoid economically damaging or unreasonable limitations on their property is one of the most emotionally charged and fiercely contested issues in contemporary law. An enormous amount of litigation at every level of government has stemmed from questions surrounding the timing and amount of government compensation to an owner of regulated property. The relevant law has undergone a complete transformation over the past decade, so count on the Law of Property Rights Protection to bring you completely up to date. Organized according to the major elements of a property rights case, the book: Analyzes the case law and identifies which challenges were successful, what fact patterns proved compelling, and what tactics have failed. Offers advice on how best to handle common situations Covers the full range of property, drawing on recent cases involving contract rights, lease hold rights, an unpatented mining claim, the possibility of reverter, the right of entry, the use of water power, and the right to exclude members of the public from a shopping center. Using Laitos' strategic approach will help you formulate your own arguments and handle taking cases with confidence.
Judicial decisions are influenced by myriad political factors, from lawyers and interest groups, to the shifting sentiments of public opinion, to the ideological and behavioral inclinations of the justices. Authors Lee Epstein and Thomas G. Walker show how these dynamics shape the development of constitutional doctrine. Known for fastidious revising and streamlining, the authors incorporate the latest scholarship in the fields of both political science and legal studies and offer rock-solid analysis of both classic and contemporary landmark cases, including key opinions handed down through the 2015 session. Filled with supporting material—photographs of the litigants, sidebars comparing the U.S. with other nations, and "Aftermath" boxes that tell the stories of the parties' lives after the Supreme Court has acted—the text encourages greater student engagement with the material and a more complete understanding of the American constitution.
The wide collection of disciplines and periods represented in this five-volume set make it an ideal companion for courses in intellectual and legal history, political history, economic history, and common and constitutional law. The essays involved offer insightful understanding into the evolution of liberty and property in ways that are accessible to students without a strong technical background in economics, philosophy, or law. They contain probing evaluations of the central problems of legal and political thought that should prove of value to advanced students and specialists in these fields. Volumes also available individually. Volume 1. Classical Foundations of Liberty and Property (0-8153-3555-5) Volume 2. Modern Understanding of Liberty and Property (0-8153-3556-3) Volume 3. Private and Common Property (0-8153-3557-1) Volume 4. Contract-Freedom and Restraint (0-8153-3558-X) Volume 5. Constitutional Protection of Private Property and Freedom of Contract (0-8153-3559-8)
Evicted! is a practical and critical look at the vulnerability of Americans' property rights to eminent domain abuse since the Supreme Court's 2005 Kelo decision.

Best Books

DMCA - Contact