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The central figure of Lao Tzu's timeless manual, the Master, reveals the power of the Tao by surrendering to it, and thereby opening his soul to universal truths.
Lao-tzu's Tao Te Ching, or Book of the Way, is the classic manual on the art of living and one of the wonders of the world. In eighty-one brief chapters, the Tao Te Ching llods at the basic predicatment of being alive and gives advice that imparts balance and perspective, a serene and generous spirit. This book is about wisdom in action. It teaches how wo work for the good with the efforless skill that comes from being in accord with the Tao (the basic principle of the universe) and applies equally to good government and sexual love, to childrearing, business, and ecology. The Tao Te Ching is the most widely traslated book in world literature, after the Bible. Yet the gemlike lucidity of the original has eluded most previous translations, and they have obscured some of its central ideas. Now the Tao Te ching has been rendered into English by the eminent scholar and traslator Stephen Mitchell. Mr. Mitchell's Dropping Ashes on the Buddha is a modern Zen classic, and his translations of Rilke and of the Book of Job have already been called definitive for our time.
The unprecedented economic growth in many East Asian societies in the few past decades have placed the region center stage, and increasing globalization has made East-West cultural understanding of even greater importance today. The Psychological and Cultural Foundations of East Asian Cognition is one of the most comprehensive volumes on East Asian cognition and thinking styles to date, and is one of the first to bring together a large body of empirical research on na�ve dialecticism and analytic/holistic thinking theories stemming from Richard Nisbett's highly influential The Geography of Thought. Edited by Julie Spencer-Rodgers and Kaiping Peng, The Psychological and Cultural Foundations of East Asian Cognition expertly examines the psychological, philosophical, and cultural underpinnings and consequences of these thinking theories for human thought, emotion, and behavior. In the past couple of decades, research on this topic has flourished, and East-West cultural differences have been documented in almost all aspects of the human condition, from the manner in which people reason and make decisions, conceptualize themselves and those around them, to how they cope with stress and mental illness, and interact with others, including romantic partners and social groups. Contributions to this volume cover such fascinating and diverse topics as cultural neuroscience and the brain, lifespan development, attitudes and group perception, romantic relationships, the adoption of foreign mindsets and perspectives, creativity, emotion, the self-concept, racial and ethnic identity, psychopathology, and coping processes and wellbeing. Further, the research featured within this volume has practical implications for business and organizational management, international relations and politics, education, and clinical and counseling psychology, and may be of particular interest to business professionals, managers in government and non-profit sectors, as well as educators and clinicians working with East Asians and Americans of East Asian descent.
"Following the principles put forth in this book will help us all to become the universal humans we were born to be. It's a step towards the conscious evolution of our planet. I endorse this work fully."-Barbara Marx Hubbard, president, Foundation for Conscious Evolution Success gurus recommend setting goals. Ancient spiritual teachings suggest living in the now and "allowing" things to happen rather than "making" things happen. What You REALLY Want, Wants You reveals the secret that's been missing for all those people whose hopeful, positive thinking didn't make them rich or bring them unending contentment and joy. Dr. Toni LaMotta takes the focus off achievement and turns it to the significance of your life as a whole, allowing you to experience the true essence of your desires. By focusing on "The Divine Dozen," twelve innate qualities you already possess, Dr. LaMotta shows you how to identify and focus on what you really want and explains why the things you think are your current goals are only distracting symbols of what you actually seek. With her Spiritual System for Success, you will discover the immense power within you, learn how to access it, and use it to embark on a genuinely fulfilling, meaningful journey. When you enjoy greater abundance in all areas of life, then you know true significance. By focusing on the divine, infinite qualities you already possess, you can obtain more than you ever thought possible-you can get what you really want.
Drawing on a variety of film semiotic theories, this book sheds light on works by mainland Chinese directors, Hong Kong New Wave directors, Taiwan New Cinema directors, and overseas Chinese directors. Zeng examines the cultural/historical implications of exile through the detailed analysis of film language and theoretical exploration.
After Confucius is a collection of eight studies of Chinese philosophy from the time of Confucius to the formation of the empire in the second and third centuries B.C.E. As detailed in a masterful introduction, each essay serves as a concrete example of thick description - an approach invented by philosopher Gilbert Ryle - which aims to reveal the logic that informs an observable exchange among members of a community or society. To grasp the significance of such exchanges, it is necessary to investigate the networks of meaning on which they rely. Paul R. Goldin argues that the character of ancient Chinese philosophy can be appreciated only if we recognize the cultural codes underlying the circulation of ideas in that world. Thick description is the best preliminary method to determine how Chinese thinkers conceived of their own enterprise. Who were the ancient Chinese philosophers? What was their intended audience? What were they arguing about? How did they respond to earlier thinkers, and to each other? Why did those in power wish to hear from them, and what did they claim to offer in return for patronage? Goldin addresses these questions as he looks at several topics, including

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