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An Expertly Written Guidebook to Teaching Design at All Levels Teaching Design provides a practical foundation for teaching about and through design. The exploding interest in design and design thinking calls for qualified faculty members who are well prepared for a variety of institutional settings and content areas. While designers know their disciplines, they frequently lack experience in constructing responsive curricula and pedagogies for rapidly evolving professions. And while K-12 educators are trained for the classroom, their ability to transform teaching and learning through design is limited by a shortfall in professional literature. Davis's extensive experience in education offers a detailed path for the development of curricula. The book addresses writing objectives and learning outcomes that succeed in the counting-and-measuring culture of institutions but also meet the demands of a twenty-first-century education. An inventory of pedagogical strategies suggests approaches to learning that serve both college professors and K-12 teachers who want to actively engage students in critical and creative thinking. Sections on assessment make the case for performance-based activities that provide credible evidence of student learning. Davis also discusses the nature of contemporary problems and teaching strategies that are well matched to growing complexity, rapid technological change, and increased demand for interdisciplinary engagement. Examples in Teaching Design span the design disciplines and draw on Davis's experience in teaching seminars for college faculty, graduate courses for design students seeking academic careers, and workshops for K-12 teachers converting their classrooms into centers for innovation.
This book presents findings of a 1993 study of how design in the curriculum helps students achieve national educational objectives. It also explores opportunities for expanding the role design can play in students' academic lives. Results of the 1993 study reveal how the use of design experiences in classrooms provides teachers and students with a learning construct for the next century. The book summarizes descriptive research that makes qualitative statements regarding current classroom practice and identifies effective models for using design in classrooms. The research tapped three primary sources of data: (1) a review of the literature; (2) a national qualitative survey of teachers; and (3) site visits to 10 schools. Also, the researchers conducted qualitative interviews with principals, curriculum coordinators, other school or district administrators, teachers, teachers' aides, students, and parents. The six chapters include: (1) "Learning Through Design"; (2) "Lifelong Learning"; (3) "A Strategy for Excellent Teaching"; (4) "Design in the Curriculum"; (5) "Opportunities and Challenges for Schools"; and (6) "Conclusions and Recommendations." Three appendices, a bibliography, and information about the authors, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development conclude the document. (EH)
More Than Sixty Course Syllabi That Bring the New Complexity of Graphic Design to Light All graphic designers teach, yet not all graphic designers are teachers. Teaching is a special skill requiring talent, instinct, passion, and organization. But while talent, instinct, and passion are inherent, organization must be acquired and can usually be found in a syllabus. Teaching Graphic Design, Second Edition, contains syllabi that are for all practicing designers and design educators who want to enhance their teaching skills and learn how experienced instructors and professors teach varied tools and impart the knowledge needed to be a designer in the current environment. This second edition is newly revised to include more than thirty new syllabi by a wide range of professional teachers and teaching professionals who address the most current concerns of the graphic design industry, including product, strategic, entrepreneurial, and data design as well as the classic image, type, and layout disciplines. Some of the new syllabi included are: Expressive Typography Designer as Image Maker Emerging Media Production Branding Corporate Design Graphic Design and Visual Culture Impact! Design for Social Change And many more Beginning with first through fourth year of undergraduate courses and ending with a sampling of graduate school course options, Teaching Graphic Design, Second Edition, is the most comprehensive collection of courses for graphic designers of all levels.
What graphic design is, what designers need to know, and who becomes a designer have all evolved as the computer went from being a tool to also becoming our primary medium for communication. How jobs are advertised and how prospective candidates communicate with prospective employers have changed as well, as has the culture and context for many workplaces, requiring new approaches for how to find your first (and last) position. Through clear prose, a broad survey of contexts where designers find themselves in the present day, and interviews with designers, The AIGA Guide to Careers in Graphic and Communication Design is an invaluable resource for finding your place in this quickly changing and growing field. The book includes interviews with over 40 designers at all levels working in-house and out-of-house in studios, consultancies, or alone, including: Nicholas Blechman, The New Yorker; Rob Giampietro, Google; Njoki Gitahi, IDEO; Hilary Greenbaum, Whitney Museum; Holly Gressley, Vox Media; Cemre Güngör, Facebook; Natasha Jen, Pentagram; Renda Morton, The New York Times; and Alisa Wolfson, Leo Burnett Worldwide.
This practical handbook for designing and teaching hybrid or blended courses focuses on outcomes-based practice. It reflects the author’s experience of having taught over 70 hybrid courses, and having worked for three years in the Learning Technology Center at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, a center that is recognized as a leader in the field of hybrid course design. Jay Caulfield defines hybrid courses as ones where not only is face time replaced to varying degrees by online learning, but also by experiential learning that takes place in the community or within an organization with or without the presence of a teacher; and as a pedagogy that places the primary responsibility of learning on the learner, with the teacher’s primary role being to create opportunities and environments that foster independent and collaborative student learning. Starting with a brief review of the relevant theory – such as andragogy, inquiry-based learning, experiential learning and theories that specifically relate to distance education – she addresses the practicalities of planning a hybrid course, taking into account class characteristics such as size, demographics, subject matter, learning outcomes, and time available. She offers criteria for determining the appropriate mix of face-to-face, online, and experiential components for a course, and guidance on creating social presence online. The section on designing and teaching in the hybrid environment covers such key elements as promoting and managing discussion, using small groups, creating opportunities for student feedback, and ensuring that students’ learning expectations are met. A concluding section of interviews with students and teachers offers a rich vein of tips and ideas.
Where do design principles come from? Are they abstract "rules" established by professionals or do they have roots in human experience? And if we encounter these visual phenomena in our everyday lives, how do designers use them to attract our attention, orient our behavior, and create compelling and memorable communication that stands out among the thousands of messages we confront each day? Today's work in visual communication design shifts emphasis from simply designing objects to designing experiences; to crafting form that acknowledges cognitive and cultural influences on interpretation. In response, Meredith Davis and Jamer Hunt provide a new slant on design basics from the perspective of audiences and users. Chapters break down our interactions with communication as a sequence of meaningful episodes, each with related visual concepts that shape the interpretive experience. Explanatory illustrations and professional design examples support definitions of visual concepts and discussions of context. Work spans print, screen, and environmental applications from around the world. This introduction to visual communication design demystifies the foundational concepts that underpin professional design decisions and shape our experiences in a complex visual world.
First released in the Spring of 1999, How People Learn has been expanded to show how the theories and insights from the original book can translate into actions and practice, now making a real connection between classroom activities and learning behavior. This edition includes far-reaching suggestions for research that could increase the impact that classroom teaching has on actual learning. Like the original edition, this book offers exciting new research about the mind and the brain that provides answers to a number of compelling questions. When do infants begin to learn? How do experts learn and how is this different from non-experts? What can teachers and schools do-with curricula, classroom settings, and teaching methods--to help children learn most effectively? New evidence from many branches of science has significantly added to our understanding of what it means to know, from the neural processes that occur during learning to the influence of culture on what people see and absorb. How People Learn examines these findings and their implications for what we teach, how we teach it, and how we assess what our children learn. The book uses exemplary teaching to illustrate how approaches based on what we now know result in in-depth learning. This new knowledge calls into question concepts and practices firmly entrenched in our current education system. Topics include: How learning actually changes the physical structure of the brain. How existing knowledge affects what people notice and how they learn. What the thought processes of experts tell us about how to teach. The amazing learning potential of infants. The relationship of classroom learning and everyday settings of community and workplace. Learning needs and opportunities for teachers. A realistic look at the role of technology in education.

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