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Teaching Sociology Successfully is a comprehensive guide to teaching, learning and delivering sociology, not only with success but with confidence. Carefully combing insightful anecdotes and practical ideas with key theoretical concepts on planning, learning styles and assessment, this book is an essential tool for both new and experienced teachers of sociology. Each chapter focuses on a particular aspect of the teaching and learning process – from preparing to teach the subject for the first time to measuring student progress over time – in an approachable yet rigorous way. This practical guide will help you to: improve your knowledge of specifications and syllabuses at GCSE and AS/A Level; provide the best pedagogic approaches for teaching sociology; think about learning styles, skills and capacities in relation to teaching sociology; gain practical ideas and activities for improving student’s argumentation, evaluation and essay writing skills; apply strategies for teaching abstract sociological theories and concepts; make the teaching of research methods engaging and interesting; deal with practical issues such as planning and assessing learning; encourage students’ independent learning and revision; connect ICT, social networking websites and the mass media to further students’ sociological knowledge; tackle the thorny issues of politics and controversial topics. Drawing on the author’s own experiences, Teaching Sociology Successfully helps readers to identify, unpack and negotiate challenges common to those teaching sociology. Complete with a variety of pedagogical resources, it provides tasks and further reading to support CPD and reflective practice. This book will be an invaluable tool for students on PGCE social science training courses, as well as School Direct candidates and undergraduates studying BEds in similar fields.
The editors have compiled this critical and comparative study of changes which took place in the New Zealand education system in the second half of the twentieth century. For other Western societies who have felt the impact of New Right policies the New Zealand case is interesting because it provides some indication of how policies of decentralization in education might be used to develop egalitarian and democratic educational policies. In recent years there have been major changes to educational systems in the Western world. Often these changes have been justified by reference to successful educational practices in other countries. However, it is not always possible simply to abstract educational practices from one context and apply them in another successfully. Moreover claims that policies in one country are more successful than those in another have to be treated cautiously: there are always problems in making valid comparisons between the educational performances of different countries. It is important, therefore, that critical and comparative studies are made of educational systems which take full account of the contexts in which they are embedded.
The challenges of teaching a successful introductory sociology course today demand materials from a publisher very different from the norm. Texts that are organized the way the discipline structures itself intellectually no longer connect with the majority of student learners. This is not an issue of pandering to students or otherwise seeking the lowest common denominator. On the contrary, it is a question of again making the practice of sociological thinking meaningful, rigorous, and relevant to today’s world of undergraduates. This comparatively concise, highly visual, and affordable book offers a refreshingly new way forward to reach students, using one of the most powerful tools in a sociologist’s teaching arsenal—the familiar stuff in students’ everyday lives throughout the world: the jeans they wear to class, the coffee they drink each morning, or the phones their professors tell them to put away during lectures. A focus on consumer culture, seeing the strange in the familiar, is not only interesting for students; it is also (the authors suggest) pedagogically superior to more traditional approaches. By engaging students through their stuff, this book moves beyond teaching about sociology to helping instructors teach the practice of sociological thinking. It moves beyond describing what sociology is, so that students can practice what sociological thinking can do. This pedagogy also posits a relationship between teacher and learner that is bi-directional. Many students feel a sense of authority in various areas of consumer culture, and they often enjoy sharing their knowledge with fellow students and with their instructor. Opening up the sociology classroom to discussion of these topics validates students’ expertise on their own life-worlds. Teachers, in turn, gain insight from the goods, services, and cultural expectations that shape students’ lives. While innovative, the book has been carefully crafted to make it as useful and flexible as possible for instructors aiming to build core sociological foundations in a single semester. A map on pages ii–iii identifies core sociological concepts covered so that a traditional syllabus as well as individual lectures can easily be maintained. Theory, method, and active learning exercises in every chapter constantly encourage the sociological imagination as well as the "doing" of sociology.
An extensive guidebook on teaching sociology, written by two recent recipients of the American Sociological Association Distinguished Contributions to Teaching Award.
The original Visible Learning research concluded that one of the most important influencers of student achievement is how teachers think about learning and their own role. In Ten Mindframes for Visible Learning, John Hattie and Klaus Zierer define the ten behaviors or mindframes that teachers need to adopt in order to maximize student success. These include: thinking of and evaluating your impact on students’ learning; the importance of assessment and feedback for teachers; working collaboratively and the sense of community; the notion that learning needs to be challenging; engaging in dialogue and the correct balance between talking and listening; conveying the success criteria to learners; building positive relationships. These powerful mindframes, which should underpin every action in schools, are founded on the principle that teachers are evaluators, change agents, learning experts, and seekers of feedback who are constantly engaged with dialogue and challenge. This practical guide, which includes questionnaires, scenarios, checklists, and exercises, will show any school exactly how to implement Hattie’s mindframes to maximize success.
Are you looking for a complete training manual, to get you through your assignments, help you on your teaching practice and support you in your first teaching job? For trainee teachers studying to teach the 14 to 19 age group in secondary schools and colleges, this book is a practical guide covering the essential skills that must be acquired in order to successfully complete your course. Five sections cover education policy, professional skills, theory, practice and reflection. The authors provide teaching ideas that work, and that will help trainee teachers to improve their grades and lesson observation profiles. There is a clear explanation of the theoretical underpinning that must be grasped in order to pass written assignments, and Masters level debates are addressed throughout the book, with a dedicated chapter exploring academic themes and issues. The book is packed with ideas for classroom activities, and popular topics covered include: - essential educational theory - behaviour and classroom management - how to start off lessons - ideas for group work - setting homework - evaluating your own practice, and understanding how you can improve - revising for exams - working as part of a team - using technology All the chapters contain learning objectives, discussion points, examples from practice, Masters level extensions (for those studying at that level) and suggestions for further reading. Suitable for all those studying to teach the 14 to 19 age range, this book is ideal for those on Secondary PGCE, PGDE and GTP courses leading to QTS, those studying for the post-compulsory sector PTLLS, DTLLS and CTLLS qualifications and those doing Overseas Teacher Training and Teach First courses. Warren Kidd and Gerry Czerniawski are former teachers with experience of working in diverse settings; they are both Senior Lecturers in the Cass School of Education, University of East London. Read Warren Kidd's blog: here

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