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In her bestselling first volume of autobiography, Testament of Youth, Vera Brittain passionately recorded the agonising years of the First World War, lamenting the destruction of a generation which for her included those she most dearly loved - her lover, her brother, her closest friends. In Testament of Friendship Brittain tells the story of the woman who helped her survive those tragic years - the writer Winifred Holtby. They met at Somerville College, Oxford, immediately after the war and their friendship continued through Vera's marriage and their separate but parallel writing careers until Winifred's untimely death at the age of thirty-seven.When she died her fame as a writer was about to reach its peak with the publication of her greatest novel, South Riding. A moving record of a friendship between two women of courage, determination and intelligence, and a wonderful portrait of a lifelong love, Testament of Friendship now takes its rightful place as a Virago Modern Classic, with a new introduction by Mark Bostridge.
Drawing on a rich array of archival sources and historical detail, The Politics of 1930s British Literature tells the story of a school-minded decade and illuminates new readings of the politics and aesthetics of 1930s literature. In a period of shifting political claims, educational policy shaped writers' social and gender ideals. This book explores how a wide array of writers including Virginia Woolf, W.H. Auden, George Orwell, Winifred Holtby and Graham Greene were informed by their pedagogic work. It considers the ways in which education influenced writers' analysis of literary style and their conception of future literary forms. The Politics of 1930s British Literature argues that to those perennial symbols of the 1930s, the loudspeaker and the gramophone, should be added the textbook and the blackboard.
Emerging in 1918 from the devastation of World War I, the modern pacifist movement expanded rapidly and soon became organized on a transnational basis. These essays present aspects of the movement's development to the end of the Second World War. The fourteen essays in Part I look at the interwar years, which gave rise to an array of pacifist organizations, both religious and humanist, throughout Europe and North America. Twelve essays in Part II deal with the brutal challenge to pacifist ideals posed by the Second World War and include a look at the fate of those courageous Germans who refused to fight for Hitler. The struggles of Christian pacifism in Japan and the satyagraha (non-violent soul force) of Gandhi in India are the focus of the two closing studies (Part III). These twenty-eight essays by scholars from eleven countries present an impressive overview of this remarkable movement, at the same time drawing out many little-known areas of pacifist activity.
Catherine Clay's persuasively argued and rigorously documented study examines women's friendships during the period between the two world wars. Building on extensive new archival research, the book's organizing principle is a series of literary-historical case-studies that explore the practices, meanings and effects of friendship within a network of British women writers, who were all loosely connected to the feminist weekly periodical Time and Tide. Clay considers the letters and diaries, as well as fiction, poetry, autobiographies and journalistic writings, of authors such as Vera Brittain, Winifred Holtby, Storm Jameson, Naomi Mitchison, and Stella Benson, to examine women's friendships in relation to two key contexts: the rise of the professional woman writer under the shadow of literary modernism and historic shifts in the cultural recognition of lesbianism crystallized by The Well of Loneliness trial in 1928. While Clay's study presents substantial evidence to support the crucial role close and enduring friendships played in women's professional achievements, it also boldly addresses the limitations and denials of these relationships. Producing 'biographies of friendship' untold in existing author studies, her book also challenges dominant accounts of women's friendships and advances new ways for thinking about women's friendship in contemporary debates.
A feminist literary study of the friendship between two modern British writers as manifested in their works.
"This is an exciting collection that proves - once again - that feminist activity continued after suffrage was won. In a lively series of essays we meet both familiar figures, such as Eleanor Rathbone and Vera Brittain, as well as the unjustly forgotten, who struggled for equal pay, greater job opportunities, better access to birth control and child benefits in an increasingly hostile political climate. Martha Vicinus, University of Michigan, US" I enjoyed reading this book very much. It adds considerably to our knowledge of feminism in the 20th century. Olive Banks, University of Leicester, UK 'The essays in this thought-provoking volume help illuminate both the continuities and conflicts in twentieth-century feminism. Carol Dyhouse, University of Sussex, UK

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