Download Free The Case For The Corporate Death Penalty Restoring Law And Order On Wall Street Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online The Case For The Corporate Death Penalty Restoring Law And Order On Wall Street and write the review.

An unprecedented breakdown in the rule of law occurred in the United States after the 2008 financial collapse. Bank of America, JPMorgan, Citigroup, Goldman Sachs, and other large banks settled securities fraud claims with the Securities and Exchange Commission for failing to disclose the risks of subprime mortgages they sold to the investing public. But a corporation cannot commit fraud except through human beings working at and managing the firm. Rather than breaking up these powerful megabanks, essentially imposing a corporate death penalty, the government simply accepted fines that essentially punished innocent shareholders instead of senior leaders at the megabanks. It allowed the real wrongdoers to walk away from criminal responsibility. In The Case for the Corporate Death Penalty, Mary Kreiner Ramirez and Steven A. Ramirez examine the best available evidence about the wrongdoing underlying the financial crisis. They reveal that the government failed to use its most powerful law enforcement tools despite overwhelming proof of wide-ranging and large-scale fraud on Wall Street before, during, and after the crisis. The pattern of criminal indulgences exposes the onset of a new degree of crony capitalism in which the most economically and political powerful can commit financial crimes of vast scale with criminal and regulatory immunity. A new economic royalty has seized the commanding heights of our economy through their control of trillions in corporate and individual wealth and their ability to dispense patronage. The Case for the Corporate Death Penalty shows that this new lawlessness poses a profound threat that urgently demands political action and proposes attainable measures to restore the rule of law in the financial sector.
Edwin H. Sutherland is widely identified as the single most important and influential criminologist of the twentieth century. He is especially well-known for his path-breaking criminology textbook (first published in 1924), his promotion of a sociological (and scientific) approach to the understanding of crime and its control, his theory of differential association, and his work over his final ten years on white-collar crime, a term he is credited with having introduced. This book explores the contemporary meaning of Edwin Sutherland and considers why criminologists today should continue to engage with his work. What can and should Sutherland mean to future 21st century criminologists, those working in the field say between 2021 and 2050, or some one hundred years after the 1921 to 1950 period that encompassed Sutherland’s criminological career? Which dimensions of Sutherland’s work have best survived the march of time and which are most likely to – and deserve to – survive going forward? Making the case that Sutherland is important to both mainstream and critical criminologists, to positivistic criminologists and those who study crimes of the powerful, this book is essential reading for both students and scholars interested in exploring the enduring legacy of this key thinker in criminology.
In this innovative and exhaustive study, Steven A. Ramirez posits that the subprime mortgage crisis, as well as the global macroeconomic catastrophe it spawned, is traceable to a gross failure of law. The rule of law must appropriately channel and constrain the exercise of economic and political power. Used effectively, it ensures that economic opportunity isn’t limited to a small group of elites that enjoy growth at the expense of many, particularly those in vulnerable economic situations. In Lawless Capitalism, Ramirez calls for the rule of law to displace crony capitalism. Only through the rule of law, he argues, can capitalism be reconstructed.
“Vivid…Barron has given us a rich and detailed history.” —The New York Times Book Review “Ambitious...a deep history and a thoughtful inquiry into how the constitutional system of checks and balances has functioned when it comes to waging war and making peace.” —The Washington Post A timely account of a raging debate: The history of the ongoing struggle between the presidents and Congress over who has the power to declare and wage war. The Constitution states that it is Congress that declares war, but it is the presidents who have more often taken us to war and decided how to wage it. In Waging War, David J. Barron opens with an account of George Washington and the Continental Congress over Washington’s plan to burn New York City before the British invasion. Congress ordered him not to, and he obeyed. Barron takes us through all the wars that followed: 1812, the Mexican War, the Civil War, the Spanish-American war, World Wars One and Two, Korea, Vietnam, Iraq, and now, most spectacularly, the War on Terror. Congress has criticized George W. Bush for being too aggressive and Barack Obama for not being aggressive enough, but it avoids a vote on the matter. By recounting how our presidents have declared and waged wars, Barron shows that these executives have had to get their way without openly defying Congress. Waging War shows us our country’s revered and colorful presidents at their most trying times—Washington, Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin Roosevelt, Truman, Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, Johnson, both Bushes, and Obama. Their wars have made heroes of some and victims of others, but most have proved adept at getting their way over reluctant or hostile Congresses. The next president will face this challenge immediately—and the Constitution and its fragile system of checks and balances will once again be at the forefront of the national debate.
New scenarios present in the sea require new legal and political approaches, because the rules governing these spaces have been out of place or new rules have arisen that require mitigation. Old aspects require new interpretations without prejudice of new uses not foreseen or contemplated in the frame of the Law of the Sea. In fact, many frustrations have been raised in this framework, because the Law of the Sea has been unable to give an answer to some of the expectations for which the United Nations Law of the Sea Convention was adopted. New doctrines and new interpretations have appeared to such an extent that experts hardly know whether they are going to lead them to a new system or to the modification of the present one. The part of the Law of the Sea that has been the most developed, but which has provoked greater problems at the same time has been the delimitation of maritime spaces, which has generated a new concept of states frontiers beyond the classical conception. This book analyses different aspects of marine delimitation. Concerning the environment, the authors focus on the analysis on the climatic change, where they have found a world of possibility to be explored. Everybody is aware that seas and oceans are the greatest dumping grounds of CO2 on Earth. Readers will easily understand that the global warming taking place is due to the lack of absorption by seas and oceans. Even more so, this provokes more storms and marine upheavals, which in turn cause the carbon deposited on the seabed to be moved and transferred to the surface, and this prevents a greater absorption of the atmospheric CO2. Finally, this book studies some social, economic and humanitarian problems affecting these maritime spaces; one has to take into consideration the new uses, the new frauds and the new dimensions that have created problems which did not exist before. In this case, the book explores sustainable fisheries and marine biodiversity, the management of marine living resources, the trafficking of persons and smuggling of migrants, the problems concerning Antarctica and the protection of underwater cultural heritage.
This book explores two combined approaches (strategy and accounting) from a cross-disciplinary perspective in order to improve knowledge of value creation in various contexts. Existing studies on this topic have generally adopted a purely account-based or strategy-oriented approach to address this issue. However, this book draws upon a number of well-defined theoretical and empirical backgrounds and methodologies. Since the 1980s, many changes have occurred and companies have increasingly focused their strategies on value creation. Consequently, new strategic directions have emerged, especially for managerial accounting. Management accounting and alignment with strategy could thus improve performance. This book encourages further thought and reflection on these issues which should be pursued in the future as firms face new challenges associated with the acceleration of digital transformation.
"Corporate justice" refers to a shared responsibility, even a moral obligation, between corporate decision makers, shareholders, external organizational constituencies, and society to ensure that the corporate decision making process is fair, civil, responsible, and just. More than that, corporate justice requires that corporations do no harm in their pursuit of profits and that shareholders as well as society in general have an affirmative responsibility to facilitate this pursuit. Corporate justice expects that founders, stakeholders, and executives in a business will honor human potential and eschew profits when such derive from unfairness, inequality, danger, and damage. This book explores each of these themes in depth, providing an insight practically non-existent in corporate law textbooks and treatises available today.

Best Books

DMCA - Contact