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Fifty years on from its original publication, HLA Hart's The Concept of Law is widely recognized as the most important work of legal philosophy published in the twentieth century, and remains the starting point for most students coming to the subject for the first time. In this third edition, Leslie Green provides a new introduction that sets the book in the context of subsequent developments in social and political philosophy, clarifying misunderstandings of Hart's project and highlighting central tensions and problems in the work.
"It covers all the main areas of International Law, such as International Economic Law, International Environmental Law, and the ways International Law deals with different types of armed conflict. It also concludes with a short chapter examining the prospects for International Law."--BOOK JACKET.
The Conflict of Laws addresses the jurisdiction of Courts (and whether their judgments are enforced and recognised overseas) and the effect of foreign judgments in England (whether these are recognised and enforced) . It also looks at the principles of choice of law for cases with an international element for example contracts made or performed in other jurisdictions or with other parties, torts committed overseas or by foreign parties, international fraud, property sited overseas, and family and personal matters (including marriage, divorce, and financial support) across different jurisdictions.
The book transcends conventional social scientific method, political theory and its understanding of global governance to make the study of the philosophical essence of the international legal system fully accessible.
Most legal expert systems attempt to implement complex models of legal reasoning. This book argues that a complex model is unnecessary. It advocates a simpler, pragmatic approach in which the utility of a legal expert system is evaluated by reference, not to the extent to which it simulates a lawyer's approach to a legal problem, but to the quality of its predictions and of its arguments. The author describes the development of a legal expert system, called SHYSTER, which takes a pragmatic approach to case law. He discusses the testing of SHYSTER in four different and disparate areas of case law, and draws conclusions about the advantages and limitations of this approach to legal expert system development. Chapter 1 presents a critical analysis of previous work of relevance to the development of legal expert systems. Chapter 2 explains the pragmatic approach that was adopted in the development of SHYSTER. The implementation of SHYSTER is detailed using examples in chapter 3. Chapter 4 describes the testing of SHYSTER, and conclusions are drawn from those tests in chapter 5. Examples of SHYSTER's output are provided in appendices.
H. L. A. Hart's The Concept of Law is without question the most important work of legal philosophy written this century; no other study has made such an important contribution to the study of jurisprudence and legal philosophy. Since it was first published in 1961 its elegant language and balanced arguments have inspired generations of students to address the wider problems associated with the study of law. In this long awaited new edition Hart presents a postscript in which he re-examines the foundations of his philosophy of law, with special attention to Professor Dworkin's criticism of it. With dispassionate lucidity he shows how much of the criticism stems from misunderstanding and confusion of thought. The postscript provides a clarification and a restatement of the fundamental tenets of his position. This thought-provoking new edition will re-open a wide range of debates and will be welcomed by all those with an interest in legal philosophy and jurisprudence.
The Concept of Group Rights in International Law offers a critical appraisal of the concept of group rights in international law on the basis of an extensive survey of existing group rights in contemporary international law. Among some of its findings is the observation that an ideological way of arguing about this legal category is widespread among scholars as well as practitioners; it sees this ideological framing as one of the main reasons why international law has so far been very reluctant to provide group rights and to call them by their name. Accordingly, the book re-evaluates the concept based on the experience with existing group rights in international law and pleads for a more pragmatic approach. Despite limitations with the concept, the overall thesis is that there is a role for group rights as a pragmatic tool allowing for a principled approach to substate groups through international law. Such an approach could turn group rights into an arguably minor, but nevertheless, highly relevant legal category of international law.

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