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"The heart of history, for Heidegger, is not a sequence of occurrences but the eruption of significance at critical junctures that bring us into our own by making all being, including our being, into an urgent issue. In emergency, being emerges."—from The Emergency of Being The esoteric Contributions to Philosophy, often considered Martin Heidegger's second main work after Being and Time, is crucial to any interpretation of his thought. Here Heidegger proposes that being takes place as "appropriation." Richard Polt's independent-minded account of the Contributions interprets appropriation as an event of emergency that demands to be thought in a "future-subjunctive" mode. Polt explores the roots of appropriation in Heidegger's earlier philosophy; Heidegger's search for a way of thinking suited to appropriation; and the implications of appropriation for time, space, human existence, and beings as a whole. In his concluding chapter, Polt reflects critically on the difficulties of the radically antirationalist and antimodern thought of the Contributions. Polt's original reading neither reduces this challenging text to familiar concepts nor refutes it, but engages it in a confrontation—an encounter that respects a way of thinking by struggling with it. He describes this most private work of Heidegger's philosophy as "a dissonant symphony that imperfectly weaves together its moments into a vast fugue, under the leitmotif of appropriation. This fugue is seeded with possibilities that are waiting for us, its listeners, to develop them. Some are dead ends—viruses that can lead only to a monolithic, monotonous misunderstanding of history. Others are embryonic insights that promise to deepen our thought, and perhaps our lives, if we find the right way to make them our own."
Contributions to Philosophy was published posthumously in 1989. The book casts Heidegger's philosophy in a wholly new light against the received opinion of Being and Time, as well as forming an important bridge between Heidegger's earlier and later works. Jason Powell's detailed and informative examination of this major work is extremely timely. Powell situates Contributions to Philosophy in the context of Heidegger's entire corpus and particularly alongside the other works he was writing in the 1930s. He shows how this important book continues to define the term 'Sein' ('Being') and further develops 'life' (here in a religious sense) as a central theme in Heidegger's work. Powell provides the reader with an overview of the significance of Contributions, its genesis and production, as well as current interpretations and its position in the received body of work on Heidegger. He explores in particular how this work relates to Heidegger magnum opus, Being and Time, and argues that Contributions was in fact the next step in Heidegger's major philosophical project as set out in his first major work.
The second edition of the Historical Dictionary of Heidegger's Philosophy is an historical perspective on the development of Martin Heidegger's thought in all its nuances and facets. Schalow and Denker cast light on the historical influences that shaped the thinker and his time through a chronology, an introductory essay, a bibliography of key books on Heidegger, appendixes, and a cross-referenced dictionary section offering over 600 entries on concepts, people, works, and technical terms.
Martin Heidegger'sContributions to Philosophyreflects his famous philosophical "turning." In this work, Heidegger returns to the question of being from its inception in Being and Time to a new questioning of being as event. Heidegger opens up the essential dimensions of his thinking on the historicality of being that underlies all of his later writings.Contributionswas composed as a series of private ponderings that were not originally intended for publication. They are nonlinear and radically at odds with the traditional understanding of thinking. This new translation presents Heidegger in plain and straightforward terms, allowing surer access to this new turn in Heidegger's conception of being.
In these lectures, delivered in 1933-1934 while he was Rector of the University of Freiburg and an active supporter of the National Socialist regime, Martin Heidegger addresses the history of metaphysics and the notion of truth from Heraclitus to Hegel. First published in German in 2001, these two lecture courses offer a sustained encounter with Heidegger's thinking during a period when he attempted to give expression to his highest ambitions for a philosophy engaged with politics and the world. While the lectures are strongly nationalistic and celebrate the revolutionary spirit of the time, they also attack theories of racial supremacy in an attempt to stake out a distinctively Heideggerian understanding of what it means to be a people. This careful translation offers valuable insight into Heidegger's views on language, truth, animality, and life, as well as his political thought and activity.
In Heidegger’s Way of Being, the follow-up to his 2010 book, Engaging Heidegger, Richard Capobianco makes the case clearly and compellingly that the core matter of Heidegger’s lifetime of thought was Being as the temporal emergence of all beings and things. Drawing upon a wide variety of texts, many of which have been previously untranslated, Capobianco illuminates the overarching importance of Being as radiant manifestation – “the truth of Being” – and how Heidegger also named and elucidated this fundamental phenomenon as physis (Nature), Aletheia, the primordial Logos, and as Ereignis, Lichtung, and Es gibt. Heidegger’s Way of Being brings back into full view the originality and distinctiveness of Heidegger’s thought and offers an emphatic rejoinder to certain more recent readings, and particularly those that propose a reduction of Being to “sense” or “meaning” and maintain that the core matter is human meaning-making. Capobianco’s vivid and often poetic reflections serve to evoke for readers the very experience of Being – or as he prefers to name it, the Being-way – and to invite us to pause and meditate on the manner of our human way in relation to the Being-way.
There are bizarre moments when we feel like strangers to ourselves. Through an investigation of Heidegger’s concept of uncanniness, Katherine Withy explores what such experiences reveal. She shows that we can be what we are only if we do not fully understand what it is to be us, and points toward what it is to live well as an uncanny human being.

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