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In The End of Negotiable Instruments: Bringing Payments Systems Law Out of the Past, author James Rogers challenges the basic assumptions of the law of checks and notes and its history, and provides a well-reasoned account of how the law could be changed to better suit the evolution of new payment technologies. The modern American law of payment systems is in disarray. Efforts to create a unified body of law for payment systems have so far been unsuccessful. Part of the reason for that failure is the assumption that the existing law works well for the traditional paper-based check system, and that problems have been created only by the evolution of new technologies. The End of Negotiable Instruments argues that this assumption is unfounded. The basic law of checks is itself anachronistic. There are no other books that undertake a similar analysis—there are legal treatises on the law of checks and notes, but all of them take for granted the basic assumptions challenged in this book. Several articles were published in the late twentieth century concerning the dispute over the application of certain doctrines of traditional negotiable instruments law to modern consumer finance transactions, but none of this literature went on to consider the broader question of whether there is anything worthwhile left in negotiable instruments law.
The proven Glannon Guide is a user-friendly study aid to use throughout the semester as a great supplement to (or substitute for) classroom lecture. Topics are broken down into manageable pieces and are explained in a conversational tone. Chapters are interspersed with hypotheticals like those posed in the classroom that include analysis of answers to ensure thorough understanding. Additionally, “The Closer” questions pose sophisticated hypotheticals at the end of each chapter to present cumulative review of earlier topics. More like classroom experiences, the Glannon Guide provides you with straightforward explanations of complex legal concepts, often in a humorous style that makes the material stick. The user-friendly Glannon Guide is your proven partner throughout the semester when you need a supplement to (or substitute for) classroom lecture. The material is broken into small, manageable pieces to help you master concepts. Multiple-choice questions are interspersed throughout each chapter (not lumped at the end) to mirror the flow of a classroom lecture. Correct and incorrect answers are carefully explained; you learn why they do or do not work. You can rely on authority; the series was created by Joseph W. Glannon―Harvard-educated, best-selling author of, among other legal texts, Examples and Explanations; Civil Procedure, now in its sixth edition. “The Closer” poses a sophisticated problem question at the end of each chapter to test your comprehension. A final “Closing Closer” provides you practice opportunity as well as a cumulative review of all the concepts from earlier chapters. You can check your understanding each step of the way. More like classroom experiences, these Guides provide straightforward explanations of complex legal concepts, often in a humorous style that makes the material stick.
The author identifies and explains the critical components and functions of the systems for the holding of rights in accounts with intermediaries, identifying underlying principles that should be embodied in modern legislation underpinning the law of a
Monetary law is essential to the functioning of private transactions and international dealings by the state: nearly every legal transaction has a monetary aspect. Money in the Western Legal Tradition presents the first comprehensive analysis of Western monetary law, covering the civil law and Anglo-American common law legal systems from the High Middle Ages up to the middle of the 20th century. Weaving a detailed tapestry of the changing concepts of money and private transactions throughout the ages, the contributors investigate the special contribution made by legal scholars and practitioners to our understanding of money and the laws that govern it. Divided in five parts, the book begins with the coin currency of the Middle Ages, moving through the invention of nominalism in the early modern period to cashless payment and the rise of the banking system and paper money, then charting the progression to fiat money in the modern era. Each part commences with an overview of the monetary environment for the historical period written by an economic historian or numismatist. These are followed by chapters describing the legal doctrines of each period in civil and common law. Each section contains examples of contemporary litigation or statute law which engages with the distinctive issues affecting the monetary law of the period. This interdisciplinary approach reveals the distinctive conception of money prevalent in each period, which either facilitated or hampered the implementation of economic policy and the operation of private transactions.
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