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Gilgamesh, King of Uruk, and his companion Enkidu are the only heroes to have survived from the ancient literature of Babylon, immortalized in this epic poem that dates back to the 3rd millennium BC. Together they journey to the Spring of Youth, defeat the Bull of Heaven and slay the monster Humbaba. When Enkidu dies, Gilgamesh's grief and fear of death are such that they lead him to undertake a quest for eternal life. A timeless tale of morality, tragedy and pure adventure, The Epic of Gilgamesh is a landmark literary exploration of man's search for immortality.
The poems about the great King of Uruk are prefaced by notes on their historical and literary background
Translated with an Introduction by Andrew George.
Since the discovery over one hundred years ago of a body of Mesopotamian poetry preserved on clay tablets, what has come to be known as the Epic of Gilgamesh has been considered a masterpiece of ancient literature. It recounts the deeds of a hero-king of ancient Mesopotamia, following him through adventures and encounters with men and gods alike. Yet the central concerns of the Epic lie deeper than the lively and exotic story line: they revolve around a man’s eternal struggle with the limitations of human nature, and encompass the basic human feelings of lonliness, friendship, love, loss, revenge, and the fear of oblivion of death. These themes are developed in a distinctly Mesopotamian idiom, to be sure, but with a sensitivity and intensity that touch the modern reader across the chasm of three thousand years. This translation presents the Epic to the general reader in a clear narrative.
Writing Historical Fiction: A Writers' & Artists' Companion is an invaluable companion for a writer working in this challenging and popular literary genre, whether your period is Ancient Rome or World War II. PART 1 includes reflections on the genre and provides a short history of historical fiction. PART 2 contains guest contributions from Margaret Atwood, Ian Beck, Madison Smartt Bell, Ronan Bennett, Vanora Bennett, Tracy Chevalier, Lindsay Clarke, Elizabeth Cook, Anne Doughty, Sarah Dunant, Michel Faber, Margaret George, Philippa Gregory, Katharine McMahon, Valerio Massimo Manfredi, Hilary Mantel, Alan Massie, Ian Mortimer, Kate Mosse, Charles Palliser, Orhan Pamuk, Edward Rutherfurd, Manda Scott, Adam Thorpe, Stella Tillyard, Rose Tremain, Alison Weir and Louisa Young. PART 3 offers practical exercises and advice on such topics as research, plots and characters, mastering authentic but accessible dialogue and navigating the world of agents and publishers.
The Secrets of Heaven are Finally Revealed! "...[Jacob] dreamed, and behold a ladder set up on the earth, and the top of it reached to heaven... [and he saw] the angels of god ascending and descending on it. And he was afraid, and said, 'How dreadful is this place! This is none other but the house of God, and this is the gate of heaven.'" --Genesis 28:12, 17 KJV. This ground-breaking and provocative book presents new and astonishing interpretations of ancient history, mythology and world religions that will call many established beliefs into question. In Gateway of the Gods, author Craig Hines invites readers to reconsider preconceived notions concerning Biblical theology in light of recent scientific discoveries and inquiries concerning the nature of the universe. This fascinating exploration reveals a number of ideas that have been suppressed and obscured behind layers of symbolism and misguided propaganda for thousands of years... until now. - Why is it that so many world cultures share details of an event when fallen angels descended upon the earth and fathered hybrid offspring called the Nephilim? - Is it possible that these beings used "gateway" technology housed within pyramids and holy temples to travel between the heavenly and earthly realms? - Do the latest advances in theoretical physics lend credibility to the idea that otherworldly beings might reside in dimensions parallel to our own? - Do the recorded voices of the "dead," known as Electronic Voice Phenomena (EVP), indicate that we may be able to communicate with these other realms? - Was a secret message embedded within ancient texts that could only be revealed after we have attained the knowledge and technology necessary to understand it? - Does this message offer a solution to the approaching environmental disaster that scientists warn will be more devastating to human civilization than any others in recorded history? Drawing from a variety of historical sources and years of meticulous research, the author weaves together a compelling argument involving a range of seemingly disparate topics that when considered together, formulate a radically new narrative concerning the history and destiny of the human race.
Hercules, Zeus, Thor, Gilgamesh--these are the figures that leap to mind when we think of myth. But to David Leeming, myths are more than stories of deities and fantastic beings from non-Christian cultures. Myth is at once the most particular and the most universal feature of civilization, representing common concerns that each society voices in its own idiom. Whether an Egyptian story of creation or the big-bang theory of modern physics, myth is metaphor, mirroring our deepest sense of ourselves in relation to existence itself. Now, in The World of Myth, Leeming provides a sweeping anthology of myths, ranging from ancient Egypt and Greece to the Polynesian islands and modern science. We read stories of great floods from the ancient Babylonians, Hebrews, Chinese, and Mayans; tales of apocalypse from India, the Norse, Christianity, and modern science; myths of the mother goddess from Native American Hopi culture and James Lovelock's Gaia. Leeming has culled myths from Aztec, Greek, African, Australian Aboriginal, Japanese, Moslem, Hittite, Celtic, Chinese, and Persian cultures, offering one of the most wide-ranging collections of what he calls the collective dreams of humanity. More important, he has organized these myths according to a number of themes, comparing and contrasting how various societies have addressed similar concerns, or have told similar stories. In the section on dying gods, for example, both Odin and Jesus sacrifice themselves to renew the world, each dying on a tree. Such traditions, he proposes, may have their roots in societies of the distant past, which would ritually sacrifice their kings to renew the tribe. In The World of Myth, David Leeming takes us on a journey "not through a maze of falsehood but through a marvellous world of metaphor," metaphor for "the story of the relationship between the known and the unknown, both around us and within us." Fantastic, tragic, bizarre, sometimes funny, the myths he presents speak of the most fundamental human experience, a part of what Joseph Campbell called "the wonderful song of the soul's high adventure."

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