Download Free The Evolution Of Western Private Law Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online The Evolution Of Western Private Law and write the review.

The result is a work that incorporates all the ideas that Watson has put forward during his twenty-five years studying comparative law and the development of legal systems, combining a remarkable range of sources with superb insight.
Monetary law is essential to the functioning of private transactions and international dealings by the state: nearly every legal transaction has a monetary aspect. Money in the Western Legal Tradition presents the first comprehensive analysis of Western monetary law, covering the civil law and Anglo-American common law legal systems from the High Middle Ages up to the middle of the 20th century. Weaving a detailed tapestry of the changing concepts of money and private transactions throughout the ages, the contributors investigate the special contribution made by legal scholars and practitioners to our understanding of money and the laws that govern it. Divided in five parts, the book begins with the coin currency of the Middle Ages, moving through the invention of nominalism in the early modern period to cashless payment and the rise of the banking system and paper money, then charting the progression to fiat money in the modern era. Each part commences with an overview of the monetary environment for the historical period written by an economic historian or numismatist. These are followed by chapters describing the legal doctrines of each period in civil and common law. Each section contains examples of contemporary litigation or statute law which engages with the distinctive issues affecting the monetary law of the period. This interdisciplinary approach reveals the distinctive conception of money prevalent in each period, which either facilitated or hampered the implementation of economic policy and the operation of private transactions.
This book provides an introduction to the rise and development of present-day private law.
A noted scholar tackles dysfunctional law.
"This book ... was intended as the course book for the class of Comparative Law at the University of Auckland, when I was to be Visiting Professor in April, 2007."--Preface.
This volume describes how the courts created rights for land owners and users competing to appropriate water for factories, town supply, drainage, and transport. It covers the period from early times to the late nineteenth century, illustrating the changing common law of property and tort, and throwing new light on the growth of the economy and the social and legal dimensions of technological innovation.Readership: Academics and post-graduate/advanced students in law and legal history. It will also have a readership in economic and social history and also the history of technology.
Each number includes "Reviews and book notices."
DMCA - Contact