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The heart of meditation—the thing that brings it alive—is compassion. Without that essential foundation, other practices are pointless. Fortunately, the mind can be trained in compassion, and the mind thus trained with the qualities of love, empathy, kindness, and respect for others is ready for the practice of the Great Completeness (Dzogchen), which is considered the pinnacle of spiritual practice in the Nyingma tradition of Tibetan Buddhism. His Holiness the Dalai Lama here teaches the Great Completeness simply but thoroughly, using as his reference a visionary poem by the nineteenth-century master Patrul Rinpoche to show that insight can never be separated from compassion. Through practice of the Great Completeness, we can access our innermost awareness and live our lives in a way that acknowledges it and manifests it. The wisdom and compassion that arise from such insight are critical, His Holiness teaches, not only to individual progress in meditation but to our collective progress toward peace in the world.
Meditation means concentrating your mind on God, God resides at heart of each of His creation.Touch your heart chakra, close your eyes and try to meditate for few minutes, thoughts will arise, try to ignore them, these thoughts take power from you and the more attention you pay to your thoughts, it become more stronger, it is not easy to ignore thoughts, but it is possible. This book provides practical methods for "soul cleaning" and meditation. Cleaning soul reduces unnecessary thoughts and make mind peaceful, then meditation allows us connect to the divinity inside us.We then discuss the effect of sincere meditation. We also provide practical guideline to check reader's current spiritual progress. The book is concluded with common questions and answers about spirituality and meditation. Keeping reader's lack of time and patience, we have kept the book short and to the point.
A translation of the ancient classic Stages of Meditation, by Kamalashila, with commentary from everyone's favorite Buddhist teacher, the Dalai Lama. The Dalai Lama explains the principles of meditation in a practice-oriented format especially suited to Westerners. Based upon the middle section of the Bhavanakrama by Kamalashila--a translation of which is included--this is the most extensive commentary given by the Dalai Lama on this concise but important meditation handbook. It is a favorite text of the Dalai Lama, and he often takes the opportunity to give teachings on it to audiences throughout the world. In his words, "This text can be like a key that opens the door to all other major Buddhist scriptures." Topics include the nature of mind, how to develop compassion and loving-kindness, calm abiding wisdom, and how to establish a union of calm abiding and special insight.
When His Holiness the Dalai Lama gave a series of lectures at Harvard University, they fulfilled magnificently his intention of providing an in-depth introduction to Buddhist theory and practice. He structured the presentation according to the teachings of the Four Noble Truths and expanded their meaning to cover most of the topics of Tibetan Buddhism. The Dalai Lama’s combination of superb intellect, power of exposition, and practical implementation are evident in these lectures. He covers a broad spectrum of topics, including the psychology of cyclic existence, consciousness and karma, techniques for meditation, altruism, valuing enemies, wisdom, and much more. This book was previously published under the title The Dalai Lama at Harvard.
This book, designed as a conversation between the Dalai Lama and Western neuroscientists, takes readers on a journey through opposing fields of thought--showing that they may not be so opposing after all. Is the mind an ephemeral side effect of the brain’s physical processes? Are there forms of consciousness so subtle that science has not yet identified them? How does consciousness happen? Organized by the Mind and Life Institute, this discussion addresses some of the most troublesome questions that have driven a wedge between Western science and religion. Edited by Zara Houshmand, Robert B. Livingston, and B. Alan Wallace, Where Buddhism Meets Neuroscience is the culmination of meetings between the Dalai Lama and a group of eminent neuroscientists and psychiatrists. The Dalai Lama’s incisive, open-minded approach both challenges and offers inspiration to Western scientists. This book was previously published under the title Consciousness at the Crossroads.
A nonviolent environment provides many benefits to its population. Although all industries can reap the rewards of nonviolence, its positive impacts can particularly be examined in applied disciplines like conflict resolution, child development, criminal justice, and social work. Creating a Sustainable Vision of Nonviolence in Schools and Society is a unique reference source that discusses the value that nonviolent spaces can add to educational institutions and societies. Featuring extensive coverage on relevant topics including conflict skills, intersectional dialogue, mentoring, co-existence, and police brutality, this is an outstanding resource of academic material for educators, academicians, graduate students, and researchers seeking to expand their knowledge on nonviolent methods and techniques for educational environments.
By establishing a dialogue in which the meditative practices of Buddhism and Christianity speak to the theories of modern philosophy and science, B. Alan Wallace reveals the theoretical similarities underlying these disparate disciplines and their unified approach to making sense of the objective world. Wallace begins by exploring the relationship between Christian and Buddhist meditative practices. He outlines a sequence of meditations the reader can undertake, showing that, though Buddhism and Christianity differ in their belief systems, their methods of cognitive inquiry provide similar insight into the nature and origins of consciousness. From this convergence Wallace then connects the approaches of contemporary cognitive science, quantum mechanics, and the philosophy of the mind. He links Buddhist and Christian views to the provocative philosophical theories of Hilary Putnam, Charles Taylor, and Bas van Fraassen, and he seamlessly incorporates the work of such physicists as Anton Zeilinger, John Wheeler, and Stephen Hawking. Combining a concrete analysis of conceptions of consciousness with a guide to cultivating mindfulness and profound contemplative practice, Wallace takes the scientific and intellectual mapping of the mind in exciting new directions.

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