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In its ninth edition, The Human Species continues to provide a comprehensive approach to biological anthropology, especially the relationship between biology and culture, behavior in an evolutionary context, and humans as a species within the primate order. With its lively narrative and emphasis on the most current topics and findings in the field, The Human Species explores the major questions that concern biological anthropologists about our species.
Facts101 is your complete guide to The Human Species, An Introduction to Biological Anthropology. In this book, you will learn topics such as The Forces of Evolution, The Evolution and Classification of Species, The Primates, and Primate Behavior and Ecology plus much more. With key features such as key terms, people and places, Facts101 gives you all the information you need to prepare for your next exam. Our practice tests are specific to the textbook and we have designed tools to make the most of your limited study time.
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50 Great Myths of Human Evolution uses common misconceptions to explore basic theory and research in human evolution and strengthen critical thinking skills for lay readers and students. Examines intriguing—yet widely misunderstood—topics, from general ideas about evolution and human origins to the evolution of modern humans and recent trends in the field Describes what fossils, archaeology, and genetics can tell us about human origins Demonstrates the ways in which science adapts and changes over time to incorporate new evidence and better explanations Includes myths such as “Humans lived at the same time as dinosaurs;” “Lucy was so small because she was a child;” “Our ancestors have always made fire;” and “There is a strong relationship between brain size and intelligence” Comprised of stand-alone essays that are perfect for casual reading, as well as footnotes and references that allow readers to delve more deeply into topics
Rethinking the Anthropology of Love and Tourism is a comprehensive analysis of love and tourism. Sagar Singh draws on anthropology, sociology, psychology, history, religious studies, study of mysticism, and literature, among other disciplines, to arrive at an understanding of love that is free from theoretical biases. Utilizing data from South Asia, India, the United Kingdom, the United States, and Europe, Singh offers many new definitions of tourism, tourism anthropology, tourism studies, and ecotourism. This book is an indispensable guide to all involved in the study of tourism anthropology, psychology, sociology, economics and marketing.
Since the politicization of anthropology in the 1970s, most anthropologists have been reluctant to approach the topic of universals—that is, phenomena that occur regularly in all known human societies. In this volume, Christoph Antweiler reasserts the importance of these cross-cultural commonalities for anthropological research and for life and co-existence beyond the academy. The question presented here is how anthropology can help us approach humanity in its entirety, understanding the world less as a globe, with an emphasis on differences, but as a planet, from a vantage point open to commonalities.
Women have shared breast milk for eons, but in White Gold, Susan Falls shows how the meanings of capitalism, technology, motherhood, and risk can be understood against the backdrop of an emerging practice in which donors and recipients of breast milk are connected through social media in the southern United States. Drawing on her own experience as a participant, Falls describes the sharing community. She also presents narratives from donors, doulas, medical professionals, and recipients to provide a holistic ethnographic account. Situating her subject within cross-cultural comparisons of historically shifting attitudes about breast milk, Falls shows how sharing “white gold”—seen as a scarce, valuable, even mysterious substance—is a mode of enacting parenthood, gender, and political values. Though breast milk is increasingly being commodified, Falls argues that sharing is a powerful and empowering practice. Far from uniform, participants may be like-minded about parenting but not other issues, so their acquaintanceships add new textures to the body politic. In this interdisciplinary account, White Gold shows how sharing simultaneously reproduces the capitalist values that it disrupts while encouraging community-making between strangers.

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