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Translation is subject to a complex and unique set of legal rules that govern its various practical and intellectual aspects. These rules derive from very different legal areas, such as intellectual property and labour law. While useful from a strictly legal point of view, the heterogeneity of sources operates as a major hurdle in terms of understanding the overall legal framework within which translation operates. This book offers a general overview of the legal rules applicable to different aspects of translation, allowing translators and other interested parties to form a broad and coherent picture of the rules applicable in this area. It draws on the provisions of the main legal systems of the world, as well as the basic international agreements relevant in this area, thus offering both a comparative perspective of the legal issues involved and a guide to relevant national legal rules. In addition to a description and analysis of the legal issues and rules involved, the book also presents hypothetical cases, with a discussion of the problems they pose and possible solutions. It explains the theoretical structure of the rules under discussion as well as their practical implications. The language and methodology of the book are sufficiently accessible to allow lawyers, translators and those who require translation work but do not have a formal legal background to follow the arguments presented.
This study concentrates on three major issues creating a basis for the making of the "Czech-English Law Dictionary with Explanations", namely language, including terminology, in both the Czech and Anglo-American systems of law; the process of legal translation; and the lexicographic method of producing a bilingual law dictionary. Terminology has been considered the most significant feature of language for legal purposes. It encompasses a wide range of special-purpose vocabulary and higher syntactic units, including legal jargon. Conceptual analysis is to be pursued whenever an identical term in the target language does not exist or its full equivalent is in doubt. Legal translation should be based primarily on comparative legal, linguistic and genre analysis in order to make the transfer of legal information as precise, accurate and comprehensible as possible. The primary objective of legal translation is for the target recipient to be provided as explicit, extensive and precise legal information in the target language as is contained in the source text, complemented (by the translator) with facts rendering the original information fully comprehensible in the different legal environment and culture. A dictionary which will help its users to produce legal texts in the target language should be founded upon a profound comparative legal and linguistic analysis that will (a) determine equivalents at the levels of vocabulary, syntax and genre, (b) select the appropriate lexicographic material to be included in the dictionary, and (c) create entries in a user-friendly manner.
This volume provides a state-of-the-art overview of institutional translation issues related to the development of international law and policies for supranational integration and governance. These issues are explored from various angles in selected papers by guest specialists and findings of a large-scale research project led by the editor. Focus is placed on key methodological and policy aspects of legal communication and translation quality in a variety of institutional settings, including several comparative studies of the United Nations and European Union institutions. The first book of its kind on institutional translation with a focus on quality of legal communication, this work offers a unique combination of perspectives drawn together through a multilayered examination of methods (e.g. corpus analysis, comparative law for translation and terminological analysis), skills and working procedures. The chapters are organized into three sections: (1) contemporary issues and methods; (2) translation quality in law- and policy-making and implementation; and (3) translation and multilingual case-law.
As a result of globalization, cross-border transactions and litigation, and multilingual legislation, outsourcing legal translation has become common practice. Unfortunately, over-reliance on such outsourcing has given rise to significant dangers, including information asymmetry, goal divergence, and risk. Legal Translation Outsourced provides the only current reference on commercial legal translation performed outside institutions. Juliette Scott casts a critical eye on the practice as it now stands, offering an analysis of key risks and constraints. Her work is informed by empirical data of the legal translation outsourcing markets of 41 countries. Scott proposes original theoretical models aimed both at training legal translators and informing all stakeholders, including principals and agents. These include models of legal translation performance; a classification of constraints on legal translation applying upstream, during and downstream of translation work; and a description of the complex chain of supply. Working to improve the enterprise itself, Scott shows how implementing a comprehensive legal translation brief--a sorely needed template--can significantly benefit clients by increasing the fitness of translated texts. Further, she opens a number of avenues for future research with an eye to translator empowerment and professionalization.
The volume presents a set of invited papers based on analyses of legal discourse drawn from a number of international contexts where often the English language and legal culture has had to adjust to legal concepts very different from those of the English law system. Many of the papers were inspired by two major projects on legal language and inter-multiculturality: "Generic Integrity in Legislative Discourse in Multilingual and Multicultural Contexts "based in Hong Kong and carried out by an international team and "Interculturality in Domain-specific English, " a national project supported by the Italian Ministry for Education and Research, involving research units from five Italian universities.
This book takes a completely new and innovative approach to analysing the development of EU law. Within the framework of different important areas of EU law, such as the internal market, consumer protection law, social law, investment law, environment law, migration law, legal translation and terminology, it examines the Union’s approach to the regulation and management of legal risks. Over the years, the Union has come to a point where it is becoming increasingly difficult to justify its authority to regulate in various areas of law. In managing legal risks deriving from the diversity of Member States’ laws, which create barriers to trade and hinder the Union’s economy, the Union itself has actually produced new legal risks that now have to be addressed. This failure on the part of EU institutions to manage legal risks has contributed to legal uncertainty for actors operating on the internal market. This book intends to contribute to the Union’s smoother functioning and continuing development by proposing effective concrete solutions for managing the legal risks distorting the development of various areas of EU law. It pursues an innovative and effective approach to identify legal risks, their causes at the EU level and their impacts on the functioning of the Union and its Member States. By presenting new approaches in this context, the first book on legal risk management in the EU will actively promote the improvement of the EU lawmaking process and the application of EU law in practice.
With increasing demands for evidence-based decision-making, the academic community must be ready to train researchers who can reduce the gap between health care research and practice. One program dedicated to promoting such training is the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation (CHSRF, now the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement) and Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR) Chair Program. Participants of these programs were selected to develop innovative research programs that bridge this divide, as well as to mentor the next generation on building partnerships with organizations outside the university through applied research. The CHSRF/CIHR Chairs have come together in Shaping Academia for the Public Good to draw out valuable lessons learned throughout its first decade. It includes chapters on funding, knowledge transfer, policy frameworks, working with multiple stakeholders, and managing organizational settings, among other topics. Shaping Academia for the Public Good will be a helpful resource for those interested in the potential of new research approaches to improve our healthcare system.

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