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The seminal event of the 20th century, the origins of the First World War have always been difficult to establish and have aroused deep controversy. Annika Mombauer tracks the impassioned debates as they developed at critical points through the twentieth century. The book focuses on the controversy itself, rather than the specific events leading up to the war. Emotive and emotional from the very beginning of the conflict, the debate and the passions aroused in response to such issues as the ‘war-guilt paragraph’ of the treaty of Versailles, are set in the context of the times in which they were proposed. Similarly, the argument has been fuelled by concerns over the sacrifices that were made and the casualities that were suffered. Were they really justified?
The First World War had profound consequences both for the evolution of the international system and for domestic political systems. How and why did the war start? Offering a unique interdisciplinary perspective, this volume brings together a distinguished group of diplomatic historians and international relations scholars to debate the causes of the war. Organized around several theoretically based questions, it shows how power, alliances, historical rivalries, militarism, nationalism, public opinion, internal politics, and powerful personalities shaped decision-making in each of the major countries in the lead up to war. The emphasis on the interplay of theory and history is a significant contribution to the dialogue between historians and political scientists, and will contribute to a better understanding of the war in both disciplines.
This companion is a significant addition to the body of scholarship on Germany’s imperial era with the emphasis very much on the present and future. Questions of continuity remain a vital line of historical enquiry and while it may have been short-lived, the Kaiserreich remains central to modern German and European history. The collection will provide a lively take on this fascinating period of history, from Germany’s unification in 1871 until the end of World War I.
Citizenship, nation, empire investigates the extent to which popular imperialism influenced the teaching of history between 1870 and 1930. It is the first book-length study to trace the substantial impact of educational psychology on the teaching of history, probing its impact on textbooks, literacy primers and teacher-training manuals. Educationists identified 'enlightened patriotism' to be the core objective of historical education. This was neither tub-thumping jingoism, nor state-prescribed national-identity teaching, but rather a carefully crafted curriculum for all children which fused civic as well as imperial ambitions. The book details contemporary debates about the purpose of history teaching and the influence of late-Victorian and Edwardian educational culture, and goes on to examine how pedagogical developments shaped the content of early-years reading books and textbooks through analysis of key themes including race, seafaring, gender and national identity. Special attention is paid to the significance of mass schooling in the formation of turn-of-the-twentieth-century cultures of hero worship, and the legacy of such developments for the 1920s. This volume will be of interest to those studying or researching aspects of English domestic imperial culture, especially those concerned with questions of childhood and schooling, citizenship, educational publishing and Anglo-British relations. Given that vitriolic debates about the politics of history teaching have endured into the twenty-first century, Citizenship, nation, empire is a timely study of the formative influences that shaped the history curriculum in English schools.
A comprehensive analysis of Britain's changing position in the world during the twentieth century, perfect for undergraduates.
This book excellently describes and analyses the often turbulent and surprising relationship between Britain and the United States throughout the nineteenth century.
With some exceptions, Noll (Christian thought, Wheaton College, Illinois) focuses on the chronological development of Christianity in the United States, although he does include a comparative chapter on Canada and Mexico. Synthesizing the work of other scholars, Noll describes the activities and bel

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