Download Free The Portable Atheist Essential Readings For The Nonbeliever Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online The Portable Atheist Essential Readings For The Nonbeliever and write the review.

Christopher Hitchens's personally curated New York Times bestselling anthology of the most influential and important writings on atheism, including original pieces by Salman Rushdie and Ian McEwan From the #1 New York Times best-selling author of God Is Not Great, a provocative and entertaining guided tour of atheist and agnostic thought through the ages--with never-before-published pieces by Salman Rushdie, Ian McEwan, and Ayaan Hirsi Ali.Christopher Hitchens continues to make the case for a splendidly godless universe in this first-ever gathering of the influential voices--past and present--that have shaped his side of the current (and raging) God/no-god debate. With Hitchens as your erudite and witty guide, you'll be led through a wealth of philosophy, literature, and scientific inquiry, including generous portions of the words of Lucretius, Benedict de Spinoza, Charles Darwin, Karl Marx, Mark Twain, George Eliot, Bertrand Russell, Emma Goldman, H. L. Mencken, Albert Einstein, Daniel Dennett, Sam Harris, Richard Dawkins, and many others well-known and lesser known. And they're all set in context and commented upon as only Christopher Hitchens--"political and literary journalist extraordinaire" (Los Angeles Times)--can. Atheist? Believer? Uncertain? No matter: The Portable Atheist will speak to you and engage you every step of the way.
Most critiques of atheism focus on refuting head-on the claims of atheists. Instead, this unique book faithfully represents what atheists say they believe and stands back to watch as the natural inconsistencies in that worldview inevitably rise to the surface. Norman L. Geisler, the apologetic giant of our time, is joined by Daniel J. McCoy, highlighting two inconsistencies in particular. First they examine the atheist's assertion that God cannot exist because there is evil in the world and that if God truly existed, he would intervene. These same people then turn around and say any intervention on God's part would impose upon human autonomy, and thus would be unjust. Second, these very interventions that would be considered immoral if imposed upon the earth by God are lauded when they stem instead from some human institution or authority. Geisler and McCoy highlight this kind of "doublethink" step by step, showing readers how to identify such inconsistencies in atheistic arguments and refute them--or rather show atheists how they refute themselves.
The first major examination of the New Atheism as a literary phenomenon.
The Athiest’s Primer is a concise but wide-ranging introduction to a variety of arguments, concepts, and issues pertaining to belief in God. In lucid and engaging prose, Malcom Murray offers a penetrating yet fair-minded critique of the traditional arguments for the existence of God. He then explores a number of other important issues relevant to religious belief, such as the problem of suffering and the relationship between religion and morality, in each case arguing that atheism is preferable to theism. The book will appeal to both students and professionals in the philosophy of religion, as well as general audiences interested in the topic.
Getting Through is the story of an ordinary, undistinguished, retired aeronautical engineer who recounts his experiences from late childhood through an idyllic adolescence, a mediocre public school education, a thwarted flying career, a bitching time in the Air Force, a second-tier now defunct engineering college, a marriage that went bad, and a career of underlying discontent with a few failures and some successes. Included are his fathers life recollections and the authors thoughts on philosophy, religion, nature and nurture, warfare, and the meaning of lifeending with accumulations of lifes journeythings done, places been, best books read, and the distance traveled on planet Earth. Getting Through, replete with wit, wisdom, and ignorance, tells us that no life is ever ordinary and that everyones story is worth telling.
Drawing on developments in cognitive science, Bracher formulates pedagogical strategies for teaching literature in ways that develop students' cognitive capabilities for cosmopolitanism, the pursuit of global equality and justice. Several staple classroom texts, such as Things Fall Apart, provide detailed examples for teaching practices.

Best Books