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An insightful portrait of junk-bond powerhouse Drexel Burnham Lambert and infamous financier Michael Milken, “one of the most brilliant minds ever to have been dedicated to Wall Street's money games.” (The New York Times). Milken is purported to have offered to pay award-winning journalist Connie Bruck to stop work on this book, the fascinating story of how a singularly brilliant and intensely private investment banker essentially masterminded the creation of the junk bond market, generating billions of dollars in profits for his clients and himself before ultimately being brought down by charges of insider trading, stock manipulation, and fraud under the RICO Act. Bruck’s in-depth narration of the phenomenal career of the man nicknamed “the Junk Bond King” spans Milken’s early dealings in high-yield bonds as well as numerous corporate raids and hostile takeovers guided by tactics that were undoubtedly revolutionary, if sometimes unethical—and occasionally outright illegal. Standing alongside other blockbuster tales of business malfeasance such as Liar’s Poker and Too Big to Fail, The Predators’ Ball is a shocking, bemusing, and enlightening portrait of an era when it seemed anything was possible on Wall Street—as long as Michael Milken was in your Rolodex.
AMIDST THE WRECKAGE OF FINANCIAL RUIN, PEOPLE ARE LEFT PUZZLING ABOUT HOW IT HAPPENED. WHERE DID ALL THE PROBLEMS BEGIN? For the answer, Jack Cashill, a journalist as shrewd as he is seasoned, looks past the headlines and deep into pages of history and comes back with the goods. From Plato to payday loans, from Aristotle to AIG, from Shakespeare to the Salomon Brothers, from the Medici to Bernie Madoff—in Popes and Bankers Jack Cashill unfurls a fascinating story of credit and debt, usury and “the sordid love of gain.” With a dizzying cast of characters, including church officials, gutter loan sharks, and even the Knights Templar, Cashill traces the creative tension between “pious restraint” and “economic ambition” through the annals of human history and illuminates both the dark corners of our past and the dusty corners of our billfolds.
Presents an alphabetically-arranged reference to the history of business and industry in the United States. Includes selected primary source documents.
The story of the perpetrators of some of the most dizzing and daring financial machinations.
The Real Life Guide to Accounting Research is a book that goes behind the more official presentations and accounts of research methods to explore the lived experiences, joys and mistakes of a wide range of international researchers principally working in the fields of accounting and finance, but also in management, economics and other social sciences. The authors of the articles in this book address a wide range of issues and obstacles that they have confronted at various stages in their respective research careers. In reflecting on their personal experiences, they provide practical guidance on how to overcome the types of problems that typically confront researchers in their day-to-day work. Practical tips on how to undertake research and get findings published Research project management skills International and interdisciplinary perspectives
From the outbreak of the Cold War to the rise of the United States as the last remaining superpower, the years following World War II were filled with momentous events and rapid change. Diplomatically, economically, politically, and culturally, the United States became a major influence around the globe. On the domestic front, this period witnessed some of the most turbulent and prosperous years in American history. "Postwar America: An Encyclopedia of Social, Political, Cultural, and Economic History" provides detailed coverage of all the remarkable developments within the United States during this period, as well as their dramatic impact on the rest of the world. A-Z entries address specific persons, groups, concepts, events, geographical locations, organizations, and cultural and technological phenomena. Sidebars highlight primary source materials, items of special interest, statistical data, and other information; and Cultural Landmark entries chronologically detail the music, literature, arts, and cultural history of the era. Bibliographies covering literature from the postwar era and about the era are also included, as are illustrations and specialized indexes.
In this sweeping, incisive post mortem, Dean Starkman exposes the critical shortcomings that softened coverage in the business press during the mortgage era and the years leading up to the financial collapse of 2008. He locates the roots of the problem in the origin of business news as a market messaging service for investors in the early twentieth century. This access-dependent strain of journalism was soon opposed by the grand, sweeping work of the muckrakers. Propelled by the innovations of Bernard Kilgore, the great postwar editor of the Wall Street Journal, these two genres merged when mainstream American news organizations institutionalized muckraking in the 1960s, creating a powerful guardian of the public interest. Yet as the mortgage era dawned, deep cultural and structural shifts—some unavoidable, some self-inflicted—eroded journalism's appetite for its role as watchdog. The result was a deafening silence about systemic corruption in the financial industry. Tragically, this silence grew only more profound as the mortgage madness reached its terrible apogee from 2004 through 2006. Starkman frames his analysis in a broad argument about journalism itself, dividing the profession into two competing approaches—access reporting and accountability reporting—which rely on entirely different sources and produce radically different representations of reality. As Starkman explains, access journalism came to dominate business reporting in the 1990s, a process he calls "CNBCization," and rather than examining risky, even corrupt, corporate behavior, mainstream reporters focused on profiling executives and informing investors. Starkman concludes with a critique of the digital-news ideology and corporate influence, which threaten to further undermine investigative reporting, and he shows how financial coverage, and journalism as a whole, can reclaim its bite.

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