Download Free The Scientific Basis Of Flocculation Nato Science Series E Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online The Scientific Basis Of Flocculation Nato Science Series E and write the review.

K.J. Ives Professor of Public Health Engineering University College London The aggregation of small particles in liquids, to form flocs which are large enough to settle, or to be filtered, is a common operation in industrial processes, and water and wastewater treatment. This aggregation, given the general title flliocculation in this book, may be brought about by the addition of chemicals to reduce the stability of the original suspension, by neutralising electrical forces of repulsion, by the addition of chemicals (polymers) to link particles by bridging action, by the addition of chemicals which form particles to increase collision proba bilities, and by the input of energy leading to hydrodynamically induced collisions. The particles undergoing flocculation may range from colloidal in the nanometer size range, through micro scopic (micron) size, up to visible particles in the millimeter size range; that is a total size range of six orders of magnitude. Consequently the colloid chemist and the hydrodynamicist are both concerned with the interactions that take place, and to them the engineer must turn, to obtain the fundamental information ne cessary for the process design and its associated hardware.
"Written by engineers for engineers (with over 150 International Editorial Advisory Board members),this highly lauded resource provides up-to-the-minute information on the chemical processes, methods, practices, products, and standards in the chemical, and related, industries. "
Emphasizes the design, control, and functioning of various unit operations - offering shortcut methods of calculation along with computer and nomographic solution techniques. Provides practical sections on conversion to and from SI units and cost indexes for quick updating of all cost information.;This book should be of interest to mechanical, chemical, process design, project, and materials engineers and continuing-education courses in these disciplines.
K.J. Ives Professor of Public Health Engineering University College London The aggregation of small particles in liquids, to form flocs which are large enough to settle, or to be filtered, is a common operation in industrial processes, and water and wastewater treatment. This aggregation, given the general title flliocculation in this book, may be brought about by the addition of chemicals to reduce the stability of the original suspension, by neutralising electrical forces of repulsion, by the addition of chemicals (polymers) to link particles by bridging action, by the addition of chemicals which form particles to increase collision proba bilities, and by the input of energy leading to hydrodynamically induced collisions. The particles undergoing flocculation may range from colloidal in the nanometer size range, through micro scopic (micron) size, up to visible particles in the millimeter size range; that is a total size range of six orders of magnitude. Consequently the colloid chemist and the hydrodynamicist are both concerned with the interactions that take place, and to them the engineer must turn, to obtain the fundamental information ne cessary for the process design and its associated hardware.
The separation of finely-divided solids from liquids constitutes an important stage in many industrial processes. Separation of mixtures ranging from highly concentrated slurries to slightly turbid liquids must be effected in circumstances where the solids, liquid or both phases may have value. Separations may be achieved by use of a membrane or filter medium which, positioned in the path of a flowing suspension, will allow passage of the fluid whilst retaining solids on the surface or within the medium. Alternatively the two phases may be separated by sedimentation processes involving gravitational or centrifugal force. In either mode, separation difficulties are sometimes experienced with the result that solid-liquid separation is often a bottleneck in commercial plants. Operational difficulties and plant failures are associated with the random nature of the particles being separated; variations in size, shape, states of aggregation, compressibility, etc. , produce a wide range of problems. Plugging of the filter medium or the collapse of the solids under applied stress lead to slow flowrates of liquid. The colloidal nature of some precipitates makes separation by settling virtually impossible without the use of chemical agents to enhance the size of basic units and to reduce repulsive surface forces. Unit operations such as filtration, comminution, etc. , involve a seemingly bewildering array of machines which makes plant selection a difficult step and reflects the uncer tainties attaching to operations involving the solid )hase. Many types of pressure, vacuum and centrifugal filter are available.

Best Books

DMCA - Contact