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The history of Guinness, one of the world’s most famous brands, reveals the noble heights and generosity of a great family and an innovative business. It began in Ireland in the mid 1700s. The water in Ireland, indeed throughout Europe, was famously undrinkable, and the gin and whiskey that took its place devastated civil society. It was a disease ridden, starvation-plagued, alcoholic age, and Christians like Arthur Guinness—as well as monks and even evangelical churches—brewed beer that provided a healthier alternative to the poisonous waters and liquors of the times. This is where the Guinness tale began. Now, 250 years and over 150 countries later, Guinness is a global brand, one of the most consumed beverages in the world. The tale that unfolds during those two and a half centuries has power to thrill audiences today: the generational drama, business adventure, industrial and social reforms, deep-felt faith, and the noble beer itself. "Frothy, delicious, intoxicating and nutritious! No, I'm not talking about Guinness Stout—I'm talking about Stephen Mansfield's fabulous new book...The amazing and true story of how the Guinness family used its wealth and influence to touch millions is an absolute inspiration." — Eric Metaxas, New York Times best-selling author "It's a rare brew that takes faith, philanthropy and the frothy head of freshly-poured Guinness and combines them into such an inspiriting narrative. Cheers to brewmaster Stephen Mansfield! And cheers to you, the reader! You're in for a treat." — R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr., Founder and editor-in-chief of The American Spectator
Discusses the history of beer and how Arthur Guinness's eighteenth-century vision for his brand of brewed beer came about, as well as his family's continued philanthropy and role as a force for social good.
The history of Guinness, one of the world’s most famous brands, reveals the noble heights and generosity of a great family and an innovative business. It began in Ireland in the mid 1700s. The water in Ireland, indeed throughout Europe, was famously undrinkable, and the gin and whiskey that took its place devastated civil society. It was a disease ridden, starvation-plagued, alcoholic age, and Christians like Arthur Guinness—as well as monks and even evangelical churches—brewed beer that provided a healthier alternative to the poisonous waters and liquors of the times. This is where the Guinness tale began. Now, 250 years and over 150 countries later, Guinness is a global brand, one of the most consumed beverages in the world. The tale that unfolds during those two and a half centuries has power to thrill audiences today: the generational drama, business adventure, industrial and social reforms, deep-felt faith, and the noble beer itself. "Frothy, delicious, intoxicating and nutritious! No, I'm not talking about Guinness Stout—I'm talking about Stephen Mansfield's fabulous new book...The amazing and true story of how the Guinness family used its wealth and influence to touch millions is an absolute inspiration." — Eric Metaxas, New York Times best-selling author "It's a rare brew that takes faith, philanthropy and the frothy head of freshly-poured Guinness and combines them into such an inspiriting narrative. Cheers to brewmaster Stephen Mansfield! And cheers to you, the reader! You're in for a treat." — R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr., Founder and editor-in-chief of The American Spectator
Ireland's best-known Irishman, his name and signature in every household and village in Ireland, and many abroad, is also the least known. Part of Dublin life for over two centuries, both family and brewery have passed into legend, but their origins have been obscured. Here, in the round, these origins are explored and the story of the man and his background told for the first time. Various sources are examined and myths about Arthur laid to rest, many of which were allowed to continue by his descendants. This narrative traces the family's origins in Ulster, Gaelic and Protestant-Irish tenant-farmers from humble backgrounds on both sides, when Arthur's father Richard appears as a household agent in Celbridge, Co. Kildare, in 1722 to work for Arthur Price, the Protestant Dean of Kildare. In 1755 Arthur takes on a brewery in Leixlip and joins the Kildare Friendly Brothers dining club in 1758, marrying and moving to St James's Gate in 1759/60 where the business developed. By 1781 he is a patriarch and member of liberal 'patriot' political groups, diversifying his assets to preserve his wealth in unsettled times. Of a generation with Edmund Burke and Richard Brinsley Sheridan, this wily businessman built an empire that endured and expanded. Family and social history combine with an account of the brewing process and descriptions of economic and political backgrounds in a rapidly developing Ireland, giving a rich weave to this tapestry. Visual sources include maps, rare original documents, prints, and photographs of associated houses and places, people, and artifacts. The result is a fascinating contextual portrait of an enigmatic figure, the founding father of one of Ireland's most powerful dynasties.
"But Guinness is more than a delicious beverage, it's also the name of the remarkable family of brewers and entrepreneurs whose story is worthy of legend, and who occupy a prominent place in Irish history. In Guinness, Yenne traces the 250-year tale of the family and its namesake beer. Beginning with Arthur Guinness, the entrepreneur patriarch who first began brewing at St. James's Gate, Dublin, in 1759, the story follows succeeding generations of the Guinness family through the years. Yenne follows not just the fortunes of the family Guinness, but also the development of the brand and the beer - from Arthur's earliest porter to the beer that is enjoyed in 150 countries today."--BOOK JACKET.
When Arthur Guinness sunk his meager savings into a small brewery on the banks of the River Liffey in Dublin, he could not have foreseen the dynasty of brewers and bankers that would carry on his family name. But Guinness also produced another kind of spirit, an extraordinary line of missionary explorers, clerics, and pioneer social workers. More famous in his day than his brewing cousins, teetotaler Henry Grattan Guinness forsook his earthly inheritance to preach the gospel to thousands and witnessed true revival. His children and grandchildren ventured to unknown lands, risked disease and death, and fearlessly confronted Western governments about the mistreatment of natives in their colonies. They also introduced social and moral reforms to the poverty-stricken East End of London. The tension between God and Mammon is a recurrent theme in a family pulled in two directions by earthly wealth and heavenly reward. Spanning two hundred years and five generations of perhaps the most famous family in the world, this history chronicles the Guinness family’s meteoric rise to its bitterest tragedies, its fame and its reversals of fortune. Michele Guinness, with inside access to diaries, letters, and personal recollections, tells the story of the Guinness family from their inauspicious eighteenth-century beginnings down to the present day.
Witty, compelling, and shrewd, Mansfield’s Book of Manly Men is about resurrecting your inborn, timeless, essential, masculine self. The Western world is in a crisis of discarded honor, dubious integrity, and faux manliness. It is time to recover what we have lost. Stephen Mansfield shows us the way. Working with timeless maxims and stirring examples of manhood from ages past, Mansfield issues a trumpet call of manliness fit for our times. “My goal in this book is simple,” he says. “I want to identify what a genuine man does—the virtues, the habits, the disciplines, the duties, the actions of true manhood—and then call men to do it.”

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