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'A devastating front-line account of the police killings and the young activism that sparked one of the most significant racial justice movements since the 1960s: Black Lives Matter ... Lowery more or less pulls the sheet off America ... essential reading' Junot Díaz, The New York Times, Books of 2016 'Electric ... so well reported, so plainly told and so evidently the work of a man who has not grown a callus on his heart' Dwight Garner, The New York Times, 'A Top Ten Book of 2016' 'I'd recommend everyone to read this book ... it's not just statistics, it's not just the information, but it's the connective tissue that shows the human story behind it. I really enjoyed it' Trevor Noah, host of Comedy Central's 'The Daily Show' A deeply reported book on the birth of the Black Lives Matter movement, offering unparalleled insight into the reality of police violence in America, and an intimate, moving portrait of those working to end it In over a year of on-the-ground reportage, Washington Post writer Wesley Lowery traveled across the US to uncover life inside the most heavily policed, if otherwise neglected, corners of America today. In an effort to grasp the scale of the response to Michael Brown's death and understand the magnitude of the problem police violence represents, Lowery conducted hundreds of interviews with the families of victims of police brutality, as well as with local activists working to stop it. Lowery investigates the cumulative effect of decades of racially biased policing in segregated neighborhoods with constant discrimination, failing schools, crumbling infrastructure and too few jobs. Offering a historically informed look at the standoff between the police and those they are sworn to protect, They Can't Kill Us All demonstrates that civil unrest is just one tool of resistance in the broader struggle for justice. And at the end of President Obama's tenure, it grapples with a worrying and largely unexamined aspect of his legacy: the failure to deliver tangible security and opportunity to the marginalised Americans most in need of it.
Recent history has documented a phenomenal surge in global unrest. From Missouri to the Middle East, the world has watched waves of momentum build, peak, and dip around events such as the shooting of Michael Brown and the acquittal of Hosni Mubarak. There have been waves of mass protests of resistance, vivid expressions of human agency through the use of technology and social media, and the clear search for finding voice in spaces where the culture of silence has been the norm for decades. This quest for humanization has led, in some cases, to macro-level changes such as the fall of governments, the collapse of economic stability, and the production of immense refugee populations. It has also led to micro-level changes within individuals' decisions to no longer be silenced or accept the status quo. Although separated by vast geographic space, this book serves to link these struggles through developing understandings of common patterns within and interconnections across oppressive societal structures. While these dynamic forms of human agency can be studied from multiple perspectives, this book is guided through the powerful ideological frameworks of culture and social reproduction and looks specifically to the role of schooling as a vehicle for catalysing change.
Nagrađivana nigerijska spisateljica Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (1977.) zasjala je na svjetskoj književnoj sceni romanom Polovica žutog sunca u kojem prikazuje građanski rat u Nigeriji. Amerikana, njezin treći i jednako snažan roman, ocrtava život u poslijeratnoj Nigeriji, ali i u SAD-u i Velikoj Britaniji. Roman je dobio nagradu američkog Nacionalnog udruženja književnih kritičara (kojom su svojedobno ovjenčane i nobelovke Alice Munro i Toni Morrison). Amerikana ponajprije prati sudbinu mladog para ̶ Ifemelu i Obinzea. Njihova Nigerija shrvana je korupcijom i siromaštvom, a ljudi bježe iz zemlje, i to ne zbog gladi ili rata, već zbog „letargije uzrokovane nedostatkom izbora“. Samosvjesna Ifemelu odlazi na studij u Ameriku gdje proživljava neuspjehe i pobjede, nove ljubavne veze i prekide, ali stalno osjeća težinu onoga o čemu u Nigeriji nikad nije razmišljala: svoje rase. Obinze ne uspijeva dobiti američku vizu i odlazi u Englesku gdje radi ilegalno i na kraju je uhićen. Trinaest godina poslije Obinze živi u Nigeriji, obogatio se i zasnovao obitelj, a Ifemelu u SAD-u piše duhovit blog o rasnim temama koji joj donosi slavu i stipendiju na Princetonu. Prekretnica romana njezina je odluka da se vrati u Afriku. Nakon toliko godina odvojenosti i promjena Ifemelu i Obinze sastaju se u naizgled drugačijoj Nigeriji... Amerikana je roman o snazi prve ljubavi i mladenačkim snovima, životu u emigraciji, političkim previranjima, američkom snu. Ona je bogata tapiserija puna živopisnih likova koja prikazuje dva svijeta, onaj nigerijski i američki. Iako progovara o tome što znači biti crne boje kože u 21. stoljeću na Zapadu i ispisuje snažnu priču o rasi i identitetu, Amerikana je u osnovi knjiga o težnji svakoga od nas da u ovome razlomljenom, napuknutom i često okrutnom svijetu nađemo svoje mjesto i smisao. „Neke knjige pripovijedaju velike priče, neke mijenjaju naš pogled na svijet. Amerikana uspijeva u jednom i drugom.“ The Guardian
The world knows the story of young Emmett Till. In August 1955, the fourteen-year-old Chicago boy supposedly flirted with a white woman named Carolyn Bryant, who worked behind the counter of a country store, while visiting family in Mississippi. Three days later, his mangled body was recovered in the Tallahatchie River, weighed down by a cotton-gin fan. Till's killers, Bryant's husband and his half-brother, were eventually acquitted on technicalities by an all-white jury despite overwhelming evidence. It seemed another case of Southern justice. Then details of what had happened to Till became public, which they did in part because Emmett's mother, Mamie Till-Mobley, insisted that his casket remain open during his funeral. The world saw the horror, and Till's story gripped the country and sparked outrage. Black journalists drove down to Mississippi and risked their lives interviewing townsfolk, encouraging witnesses, spiriting those in danger out of the region, and above all keeping the news cycle turning. It continues to turn. In 2005, fifty years after the murder, the FBI reopened the case. New papers and testimony have come to light, and several participants, including Till's mother, have published autobiographies. Using this new evidence and a broadened historical context, Elliott J. Gorn delves more fully than anyone has into how and why the story of Emmett Till still resonates, and always will. Till's murder marked a turning point, Gorn shows, and yet also reveals how old patterns of thought and behavior endure, and why we must look hard at them.
"State of Denial feels all the more outraged for its measured, nonpartisan tones and relentless reporting. It is nothing less than a watershed.... The full story of the Iraq War will be told by historians....This book...will be at the top of their shelves as they proceed to the altar of judgment." -- Ted Widmer, The Washington Post Book World "Serious, densely, even exhaustively reported, and a real contribution to history in that it gives history what it most requires, first-person testimony....This is a primer on how the executive branch of the United States works, or rather doesn't work, in the early years of the 21st century." -- Peggy Noonan, The Wall Street Journal "Never-before-reported nuggets in every chapter....It offers the most revealing in-the-room glimpse of the Bush administration that we have so far." -- Walter Shapiro, Salon.com "State of Denial is brimming with vivid details about White House meetings, critical phone calls, intelligence reports, and military affairs....Impressively detailed and eye-opening revelations about the Bush administration's handling of the Iraq war and its aftermath." -- Chuck Leddy, The Boston Globe "Woodward's book is packed with details about the gulf between the information the administration had and the picture it presented." -- USA Today "Woodward's trilogy on the Bush administration at war is essential, and compelling, reading." -- Foreign Affairs
Started in the wake of George Zimmerman's 2013 acquittal in the death of Trayvon Martin, the #BlackLivesMatter movement has become a powerful and uncompromising campaign demanding redress for the brutal and unjustified treatment of black bodies by law enforcement in the United States. The movement is only a few years old, but as Christopher J. Lebron argues in this book, the sentiment behind it is not; the plea and demand that "Black Lives Matter" comes out of a much older and richer tradition arguing for the equal dignity - and not just equal rights - of black people. The Making of Black Lives Matter presents a condensed and accessible intellectual history that traces the genesis of the ideas that have built into the #BlackLivesMatter movement. Drawing on the work of revolutionary black public intellectuals, including Frederick Douglass, Ida B. Wells, Langston Hughes, Zora Neal Hurston, Anna Julia Cooper, Audre Lorde, James Baldwin, and Martin Luther King Jr., Lebron clarifies what it means to assert that "Black Lives Matter" when faced with contemporary instances of anti-black law enforcement. He also illuminates the crucial difference between the problem signaled by the social media hashtag and how we think that we ought to address the problem. As Lebron states, police body cameras, or even the exhortation for civil rights mean nothing in the absence of equality and dignity. To upset dominant practices of abuse, oppression and disregard, we must reach instead for radical sensibility. Radical sensibility requires that we become cognizant of the history of black thought and activism in order to make sense of the emotions, demands, and argument of present-day activists and public thinkers. Only in this way can we truly embrace and pursue the idea of racial progress in America.

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