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Addy and Maya from Tic Tac Toy have gathered facts and photos to share with you. Learn about the things they like and do for fun. Now it's your turn. Fill this book with your favorite things, doodles and photos. Color the pages and make this book your own. It's all about you!
This book gives history about tic tac toe, how all the possible combinations were found, and finally all of the combinations you need to know to never lose another game again.
Peter Seibel interviews 15 of the most interesting computer programmers alive today in Coders at Work, offering a companion volume to Apress’s highly acclaimed best-seller Founders at Work by Jessica Livingston. As the words “at work” suggest, Peter Seibel focuses on how his interviewees tackle the day-to-day work of programming, while revealing much more, like how they became great programmers, how they recognize programming talent in others, and what kinds of problems they find most interesting. Hundreds of people have suggested names of programmers to interview on the Coders at Work web site: www.codersatwork.com. The complete list was 284 names. Having digested everyone’s feedback, we selected 15 folks who’ve been kind enough to agree to be interviewed: Frances Allen: Pioneer in optimizing compilers, first woman to win the Turing Award (2006) and first female IBM fellow Joe Armstrong: Inventor of Erlang Joshua Bloch: Author of the Java collections framework, now at Google Bernie Cosell: One of the main software guys behind the original ARPANET IMPs and a master debugger Douglas Crockford: JSON founder, JavaScript architect at Yahoo! L. Peter Deutsch: Author of Ghostscript, implementer of Smalltalk-80 at Xerox PARC and Lisp 1.5 on PDP-1 Brendan Eich: Inventor of JavaScript, CTO of the Mozilla Corporation Brad Fitzpatrick: Writer of LiveJournal, OpenID, memcached, and Perlbal Dan Ingalls: Smalltalk implementor and designer Simon Peyton Jones: Coinventor of Haskell and lead designer of Glasgow Haskell Compiler Donald Knuth: Author of The Art of Computer Programming and creator of TeX Peter Norvig: Director of Research at Google and author of the standard text on AI Guy Steele: Coinventor of Scheme and part of the Common Lisp Gang of Five, currently working on Fortress Ken Thompson: Inventor of UNIX Jamie Zawinski: Author of XEmacs and early Netscape/Mozilla hacker
Now in full color, the 10th anniversary edition of this classic book takes you deep into the influences that underlie modern video games, and examines the elements they share with traditional games such as checkers. At the heart of his exploration, veteran game designer Raph Koster takes a close look at the concept of fun and why it’s the most vital element in any game. Why do some games become boring quickly, while others remain fun for years? How do games serve as fundamental and powerful learning tools? Whether you’re a game developer, dedicated gamer, or curious observer, this illustrated, fully updated edition helps you understand what drives this major cultural force, and inspires you to take it further. You’ll discover that: Games play into our innate ability to seek patterns and solve puzzles Most successful games are built upon the same elements Slightly more females than males now play games Many games still teach primitive survival skills Fictional dressing for modern games is more developed than the conceptual elements Truly creative designers seldom use other games for inspiration Games are beginning to evolve beyond their prehistoric origins
An “honest, compelling, and smart memoir” about growing up with an abusive father and the desperate search for a missing sister (Holly Goldberg Sloan). Raised in the city, it took Sandra some time to get used to her new home in West Virginia, but she soon found that the forests, rivers, and mountains were safer than the house that held her volatile father. Exploring the outdoors distracted her from the violence waiting at home. But then her mother became pregnant again. And Sandra’s concern for her family grew when her mother returned home from the hospital without the baby. In Two Thousand Minnows, Sandra reflects on the events of her childhood and adolescence, including the time spent traveling across the country with her anxious, worn-out family in a small, cramped car. As she grows older, she realizes that what they’re chasing when they move from town to town—the perfect, stable life—could never exist for her until she found the answers to all the questions she never asked. As an adult, Sandra decides to stop running from the past and instead revisit it, refusing to give up until she unearths the truth—and finds the sister who never came home. “Like many stories of survival . . . it’s likely to offer welcome comfort to readers who endured childhood traumas themselves.” —Publishers Weekly “One of the great literary discoveries of the year.” —Holly Goldberg Sloan, author of Counting by 7s “I stayed up late, caught up in this story of a West Virginia girl’s search for a lost baby—and her own truest self.” —Laura Cunningham, author of Sleeping Arrangements
Traditional game theory has been successful at developing strategy in games of incomplete information: when one player knows something that the other does not. But it has little to say about games of complete information, for example, tic-tac-toe, solitaire and hex. The main challenge of combinatorial game theory is to handle combinatorial chaos, where brute force study is impractical. In this comprehensive volume, Jzsef Beck shows readers how to escape from the combinatorial chaos via the fake probabilistic method, a game-theoretic adaptation of the probabilistic method in combinatorics. Using this, the author is able to determine the exact results about infinite classes of many games, leading to the discovery of some striking new duality principles. Available for the first time in paperback, it includes a new appendix to address the results that have appeared since the book's original publication.
What a great idea: a way to play tic-tac-toe when a partner’s not available. Each space in the grid has a page number and a letter. Fill one in, then turn to that page and find out what move the book wants to make. Keep on going until the game is done. There’s just one way to come out a winner in each game—but it’s not easy! Great for travelers, those waiting on line, or a child sick at home.

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