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Berry Mayall argues in this work that, since childhood is a permanent component of society, in order to understand how society works, we must take account of children as well as adults, otherwise our explanation omits an important social group. Children's lives are shaped by policies and practices, but they are also agents, who make a life for themselves through their relationships with adults and other children. This book argues that feminist theory and practice is useful for understanding childhood; we should start from the children's own accounts to show how the organization of social relations provides an explanation for their social position.
This volume seeks to directly address the problems and pitfalls that often accompany researching children and youth in today’s society. This volume addresses participatory and feminist ethnographic approaches, digital mining, children’s agency, and navigating IRBs. Themes of space, location, and identity run throughout this volume.
Informed by ethnographic research with children, Davies offers new sociological insights into children's personal relationships, as well as closely examining methodological approaches to researching with children and researching relationships.
The book presented here describes an outstanding attempt, not only to include children’s views but to partner with children to develop the concept of well-being and to study the phenomenon as the children understand it. The authors do this by placing the concept of children’s well-being within the existing discourses on the topic and by developing their unique theoretical approach to the concept. Then, and based on what children told them, the authors identify different domains and dimensions of children’s well-being and touch upon its multifaceted nature. The book concludes with drawing research and policy implications from an integrated summary of the study’s findings and lists indicator concepts that present an alternative framework and conceptualisation of well-being from a child standpoint.
Offering an insight into the evolving state of law and childhood studies in the modern age, the latest volume in the Current Legal Issues series brings together an international and interdisciplinary cast to address the key issues informing current debates.
The heart of this book is the translation of The Life Space of the Urban Child, written in 1935 by Martha and Hans Heinrich Muchow. Life Space provides a fresh look at children as actors and how they absorb their city environments. It uses an empirical base connected with theories about the worlds in which children live. The first section provides historical background on Muchow’s study and the author. The second section presents the translation of the Life Space study, as well as comments from an environmental psychologist’s perspective. The third section reviews the study’s theoretical foundations, including the concept of “critical personalism,” the perspectives of phenomenology, and the notion of Umwelt (environment). The last section addresses various lines of research developed from the Life Space study, including Muchow’s work in describing children in urban environments, methodological approaches, and the significance of space in social science and educational contexts. The manner in which Martha Muchow conducted her studies is itself of note. She obtained access to the children in their environments and combined observation with cartographies and essays produced by the children. This approach was new at the time and continues to inspire researchers today. This volume is the latest work in Transaction’s History and Theory of Psychology series.
Childhood is an extremely complex and highly contested concept. It refers to a life phase as well as to the age group defined as children, but is also a cultural construction, part of the social and economic structure of communities. The key scholarship collected, introduced, and reprinted in these volumes reflects this complexity and introduces the reader to the wide variety of interpretations that have been and continue to be placed on it. It might be suggested that the push or initiative in theorizing childhood has derived from advances within sociology and anthropology. However, the future provides potential for interdisciplinary study, which this collection also reflects. The contemporary study of childhood must comprise a conjoining of disciplines: sociology; anthropology; psychology; social geography; history; philosophy; and socio-legal theory, all have something to add to the field and are represented within the collection.

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