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Berry Mayall argues in this work that, since childhood is a permanent component of society, in order to understand how society works, we must take account of children as well as adults, otherwise our explanation omits an important social group. Children's lives are shaped by policies and practices, but they are also agents, who make a life for themselves through their relationships with adults and other children. This book argues that feminist theory and practice is useful for understanding childhood; we should start from the children's own accounts to show how the organization of social relations provides an explanation for their social position.
In Children Taken Seriously, leading researchers and policy makers consider how children can be recognized as social actors rather than passive consumers or victims. Using children's own views and experiences as a starting point, they explore how children can be involved as partners in the decision-making processes that affect them, in social work, education, health care and broader social policies. Chapters on the theoretical background draw parallels between developments in children's and women's rights, and discuss communication issues and social and sexual constructions of children. Other chapters explore issues of policy and practice in a variety of areas, from Family Group Conferencing and child protection to child labour and notions of active citizenship. Highlighting the important role of schools in empowering children, the authors discuss children's engagement in and participation in their own education and how children's rights theory influences debates over discipline. This accessible and thought-provoking book is a rich source of insight and ideas for social workers, teachers, mental health professionals and anyone working with children.
This book critically examines the concepts of participation and social inclusion and their links with children and childhoods ; considers the geography of social inclusion and exclusion ; and examines how these concepts have been expressed in policy at various levels. The book concludes with an agenda for progressing participation and social inclusion, both for and with children and young people.
Informed by ethnographic research with children, Davies offers new sociological insights into children's personal relationships, as well as closely examining methodological approaches to researching with children and researching relationships.
Outlining sociology’s distinctive contribution to childhood studies and our understanding of contemporary children and childhood, The Sociology of Children, Childhood and Generation provides a thought provoking and comprehensive account of the connections between the macro worlds of childhood and the micro worlds of children’s everyday lives. Examining children’s involvement in areas such as the labour market, family life, education, play and leisure, the book provides an effective balance between understanding childhood as a structural phenomenon, and recognising children as meaning makers actively involved in constructing, co-constructing and reconstructing their everyday lives. Through the concept of 'generagency' Madeleine Leonard offers a model for examining and illuminating how structure and agency are activated within interdependent relationships influenced by generational positioning. This framework provides a conceptual tool for thinking about the continuities, challenges and changes that impact on how childhood is lived and experienced.
Adult Supervision Required considers the contradictory ways in which contemporary American culture has imagined individual autonomy for parents and children. In many ways, today’s parents and children have more freedom than ever before. There is widespread respect for children’s autonomy as distinct individuals, and a broad range of parenting styles are flourishing. Yet it may also be fair to say that there is an unprecedented fear of children’s and parents’ freedom. Dread about Amber Alerts and “stranger danger” have put an end to the unsupervised outdoor play enjoyed by earlier generations of suburban kids. Similarly, fear of bad parenting has not only given rise to a cottage industry of advice books for anxious parents, but has also granted state agencies greater power to police the family. Using popular parenting advice literature as a springboard for a broader sociological analysis of the American family, Markella B. Rutherford explores how our increasingly psychological conception of the family might be jeopardizing our appreciation for parents’ and children’s public lives and civil liberties.
This volume seeks to directly address the problems and pitfalls that often accompany researching children and youth in today’s society. This volume addresses participatory and feminist ethnographic approaches, digital mining, children’s agency, and navigating IRBs. Themes of space, location, and identity run throughout this volume.

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