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Examines the literary and cultural environment underlying various kinds of translations
With the rapidly developing globalization of various sectors of modern life, individuals, organizations, and nations are becoming increasingly aware of the ways in which cultural diversity may not only be a potential cause of conflict but also a source of growth, creativity, and inspiration. If, traditionally, intercultural mediation has been understood as a conflict-solving strategy or as a means to facilitate communication between individuals from different cultural backgrounds, Bridging Culture aims at providing a framework and a set of theoretical reflections towards a larger vision of the field, presenting mediation as a particular form of critical intervention within the different domains of the humanities. The contributions in the present volume take intercultural mediation to be a multifaceted, interdisciplinary phenomenon, impacting upon the fields of linguistics and literature as well as translation and cultural studies, where themes such as interculturality, multilingualism, and cultural transfer are continual and urgent features of contemporary discourse and debate.
Who is to Blame? What is the Truth? Could it be Otherwise? When theatre began, two and a half millennia ago in ancient Greece, it drew from a well of even older myths, the Epic Cycle. These myths were Europe’s first account of the tragedy and comedy of the human enterprise. Stories and characters from the beginning of our imagination inspired John Barton to write the great cycle of human life, Tantalus, an epic theatre myth for the modern age. Its subject is the Trojan War, a crusade which became a catastrophe. Helen of Troy – was she really the cause of this ten-year war? Agamemnon’s anguish – did he have to sacrifice his daughter? Clytemnestra – was her murderous revenge justified? A wooden horse – how could it destroy a great city? Heroes humbled, children hurt, mothers and fathers bereaved, entire nations shaken and rebuilt: all pass through this kaleidoscope of human fate. This new edition of Tantalus is the culmination of a lifetime’s work and fully encompasses John Barton’s visions and revisions.
The conception of the Other has long been a problem for philosophers. Emmanuel Levinas, best known for his attention to precisely that issue, argued that the voyages of Ulysses represent the very nature of Western philosophy: "His adventure in the world is nothing but a return to his native land, a complacency with the Same, a misrecognition of the Other." In Memories of Odysseus, François Hartog examines the truth of Levinas' assertion and, in the process, uncovers a different picture. Drawing on a remarkable range of authors and texts, ancient and modern, Hartog looks at accounts of actual travelers, as well as the way travel is used as a trope throughout ancient Greek literature, and finds that, instead of misrecognition, the Other is viewed with doubt and awe in the Homeric tradition. In fact, he argues, the Odyssey played a crucial role in shaping this attitude in the Greek mind, serving as inspiration for voyages in which new encounters caused the Greeks to revise their concepts of self and other. Ambitious in scope, this book is a sophisticated exploration of ancient Greece and its sense of identity.
The poetry of Horace was central to Victorian male elite education and the ancient poet himself, suitably refashioned, became a model for the English gentleman. Horace and the Victorians examines the English reception of Horace in Victorian culture, a period which saw the foundations of the discipline of modern classical scholarship in England and of many associated and lasting social values. It shows that the scholarly study, translation and literary imitation of Horace in this period were crucial elements in reinforcing the social prestige of Classics as a discipline and its function as an indicator of 'gentlemanly' status through its domination of the elite educational system and its prominence in literary production. The book ends with an epilogue suggesting that the framework of study and reception of a classical author such as Horace, so firmly established in the Victorian era, has been modernised and 'democratised' in recent years, matching the movement of Classics from a discipline which reinforces traditional and conservative social values to one which can be seen as both marginal and liberal.
Modern responses to the trials of Socrates and the ironies of Socratic inquiry

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