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Transparency of the European Union's institutions has engendered much law over the last ten years. This handbook is the first publication to provide a comprehensive practical overview of these rules. Moreover, the author discusses in detail the practice that has developed within the institutions in applying them. Transparency in EU Institutional Law - A Practitioner's Handbookwill be of interest to anyone who needs to access documentation from any of the EU institutions and to EU officials obliged to apply the law. In addition to giving a comprehensive overview on the law relating to public access to documents, the author discusses in detail other aspects of transparency in the European Union, such as the rules on lobbying, the public Council meetings, and requests for information.
Research Handbook on EU Institutional Law offers a critical look into the European Union: its legal foundations, competences and institutions. It provides an analysis of the EU legal system, its application at the national level and the prevalent role of the Court of Justice. Throughout the course of the Handbook the expert contributors discuss whether the European Union is well equipped for the 21st century and the numerous crises it has to handle. They revisit the call for an EU reform made in the Laeken Conclusions in 2001 to verify if its objectives have been achieved by the Treaty of Lisbon and in daily practice of the EU institutions. The book also delves into the concept of a Europe of different speeds, which - according to some - is inevitable in the EU comprising 28 Member States. Overall, the assessment of the changes introduced by the Lisbon Treaty is positive, even if there are plenty of suggestions for further reforms to re-fit the EU for purpose.
The fourth edition of this well established and highly regarded work on EU law maintains its character by combining comprehensive yet accessible coverage with in-depth analysis of the law and student-friendly pedagogy. It is fully up to date so encompassing critical examination of new important judgments of EU and national courts and developments in institutional, constitutional and substantive EU Law. The book keeps its unique style in that it is both a textbook and a casebook. Case summaries are highlighted in colour-tinted boxes for ease of reference, and are accompanied by key facts and critical analysis, often in the light of subsequent developments. The student-friendly approach is enhanced by market-driven pedagogical features, including: Concise outlines, at the beginning of each chapter describing its content and assisting in revision; An aide-mémoire, often presented in diagrammatic form, at the end of each chapter to highlight and reinforce key points; End of chapter recommended reading lists to encourage and facilitate further research; End of chapter problem and essay questions testing the students’ ability to apply what they have learnt; Cross-references to show how topics are interrelated; and A map identifying EU Member States, candidate States; and, potential candidate States. The book’s companion website offers a range of teaching and learning resources including an interactive timeline of the EU, useful web links, self-test questions and much more. This book is essential reading for those studying EU law on both undergraduate and postgraduate courses and will be of interest to students of political science, social science and business studies.
As a medium for communication between the EU and the USA, law has the ability to provide unique insights into the state of contemporary transatlantic relations. A Transatlantic Community of Law offers legal perspectives on the emerging institutional characteristics of transatlantic relations and contemporary rule-making in both trade and security. Making use of rule of law analysis which has hitherto not been conducted in transatlantic relations scholarship, it draws together EU law, governance and rule-making scholarship and offers new ways of thinking about the use of law and contemporary transatlantic institutions.
This Handbook comprehensively addresses the breadth of law encompassed by the EEA Agreement, which extends the European Union’s Single Market to three EFTA countries: Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway. The Handbook is first and foremost intended for practitioners and legal scholars, but its approachable style makes it readily accessible for students. The Handbook provides the reader with a thorough grounding in the EEA Agreement, detailing how secondary EU law becomes applicable in the EFTA pillar, and the roles played by the EFTA Surveillance Authority and the EFTA Court. It considers the EEA Agreement from the respective perspectives of the national authorities, courts, and the legal professions of Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway. The book meticulously examines substantive EEA law, beginning with the general principles and the four freedoms, through competition law and State aid to such aspects as the precautionary principle, tax law and mutual administrative and legal assistance. Emphasis is placed on jurisprudence and especially that of the EFTA Court. Each chapter has been written by a judge, noted practitioner or eminent academic in their respective fields and the book is divided into twelve parts: Part I History and main features of the EEA Agreement Part II Genesis of EEA Law Part III Institutions and Procedure Part IV National Authorities in the EFTA Pillar Part V National Courts in the EFTA Pillar Part VI The Practicing Bar in the EFTA Pillar Part VII General Principles and Prohibition Part VIII The Fundamental Freedoms Part IX Competition Law and Related Matters Part X Further Areas of Economic Law Part XI Law of Natural and Economic Resources Part XII Social Protection and Public Health
The recent years have witnessed a growing concern in the EU institutions for the ways in which openness and citizen participation are believed to distract efficient decision-making. Various examples of such attitudes can be easily identified, demonstrating how the EU institutions still fail to possess a deeper understanding of the role of transparency in legitimate governance. This paper discusses the ways in which the right of public access often turns into institutional politics with the institutions and the Member States in fact buttressing their own interests. This has serious consequences for the understanding of citizens' rights to participate in democratic decision-making. These questions are examined in the areas of legislative matters and international relations. The problems identified are then placed in the context of wider administrative culture in the relevant EU institutions, reflected in their responses to the citizens' concerns. The paper concludes with a few remarks on the wishes of the European Council to create greater legitimacy for the Economic and Monetary Union, and the role of openness in that discussion.

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