Download Free Transparency In Eu Institutional Law Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Transparency In Eu Institutional Law and write the review.

Transparency of the European Union's institutions has engendered much law over the last ten years. This handbook is the first publication to provide a comprehensive practical overview of these rules. Moreover, the author discusses in detail the practice that has developed within the institutions in applying them. Transparency in EU Institutional Law - A Practitioner's Handbookwill be of interest to anyone who needs to access documentation from any of the EU institutions and to EU officials obliged to apply the law. In addition to giving a comprehensive overview on the law relating to public access to documents, the author discusses in detail other aspects of transparency in the European Union, such as the rules on lobbying, the public Council meetings, and requests for information.
Research Handbook on EU Institutional Law offers a critical look into the European Union: its legal foundations, competences and institutions. It provides an analysis of the EU legal system, its application at the national level and the prevalent role of the Court of Justice. Throughout the course of the Handbook the expert contributors discuss whether the European Union is well equipped for the 21st century and the numerous crises it has to handle. They revisit the call for an EU reform made in the Laeken Conclusions in 2001 to verify if its objectives have been achieved by the Treaty of Lisbon and in daily practice of the EU institutions. The book also delves into the concept of a Europe of different speeds, which - according to some - is inevitable in the EU comprising 28 Member States. Overall, the assessment of the changes introduced by the Lisbon Treaty is positive, even if there are plenty of suggestions for further reforms to re-fit the EU for purpose.
This book examines the issue of free access to information as part of the openness and transparency principles. The free access to public information has become one of the most hotly contested aspects of contemporary government and public administration. Many countries in Europe have well-established Freedom of Information laws (FOIAs), while others have adopted them more recently. The problems that occur in the implementation of FOIAs are different due to the legal and institutional context; nevertheless, patterns of best practices and malfunctioning are comparable. The book analyses in comparative and empirical perspective the respective main challenges. Whilst the existing literature focusses on the legal provisions, this book offers practical insights through 13 national profiles and the EU level, on how effective the legal provisions of FOIAs really prove to be.
In the last 15 years, transparency has been one of the central themes in the European integration process. By providing more openness about its activities, the European Union tries to bring itself closer to its citizens. Transparency is considered one of the main methods to relieve the 'democratic deficit'. One way of increasing transparency is to grant citizens a right to access information. Another way is to actively publish information. Transparency is not an exclusive feature of European integration. On the contrary, inspiration for policies on access to information is mostly drawn from the sometimes longstanding experiences of the member states. Access to Information in the European Union provides for a detailed and useful overview of EC and member state legislation in the field of access to information, highlighting the similarities and differences between national legislation of different member states.
Research Handbook on EU Institutional Law offers a critical look into the European Union: its legal foundations, competences and institutions. It provides an analysis of the EU legal system, its application at the national level and the prevalent role of the Court of Justice. Throughout the course of the Handbook the expert contributors discuss whether the European Union is well equipped for the 21st century and the numerous crises it has to handle. They revisit the call for an EU reform made in the Laeken Conclusions in 2001 to verify if its objectives have been achieved by the Treaty of Lisbon and in daily practice of the EU institutions. The book also delves into the concept of a Europe of different speeds, which - according to some - is inevitable in the EU comprising 28 Member States. Overall, the assessment of the changes introduced by the Lisbon Treaty is positive, even if there are plenty of suggestions for further reforms to re-fit the EU for purpose.
All litigants before the General Court of the EU (GC), the Court of Justice of the EU (ECJ) or indeed before any EU body or agency will need to have full access to the documents held by the European Union. Though the legislation regulating the field, Regulation 1049/2001, has been in force for some time, it is a complex field for all would-be litigants. In this book the authors, both experienced practitioners in the area, clearly set out the documentation, access requirements and processes. They include a helpful glossary of terms, tables and appendices setting out the relevant legislation. This will be the seminal text for all practitioners who need to access documentation held by the EU.
The Lisbon Treaty entered into force on December 1, 2009, after being ratified by all 27 member states of the European Union, and introduced changes to European law and institutions. This publication, by Klaus-Dieter Borchardt, examines the roots of the European project and its development as a legal order, and is a definitive reference work on the subject. The author offers insight into how the European Union is built, its broad principles and the legal order underpinning it, looking at this in relation to the national laws of the member states.--Publisher's description.

Best Books

DMCA - Contact