Download Free Travels With Bobby Hiking In The Mountains Of The American West Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Travels With Bobby Hiking In The Mountains Of The American West and write the review.

Brooks Eason and his best friend, Bobby Ariatti, live in the flatlands but love the mountains. They have explored the outdoors together for two decades, taking annual hiking trips to the mountains of the American West. This is the story of their first six trips. Their travels begin in Yosemite National Park in California. In the years that follow, they hike and camp in Glacier National Park in Montana, Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming, the Glacier Peak Wilderness in Washington, the Wind River Range in Wyoming, and again in Glacier National Park. Along the way, they make new friends, view wildlife and waterfalls, dodge dangers, and enjoy campfires as they experience some of the most beautiful scenery in America. Retrace their steps and relive their adventures in Travels with Bobby.
The beautiful Beartooth Mountains are home to glaciers, deep canyons, streams, waterfalls, over a thousand lakes, abundant wildlife, protected wilderness areas, national forests, and North America's largest alpine tundra region. Now in its 5th edition, Day Hikes In the Beartooth Mountains includes an extensive collection of hikes within this mountain range bordering Yellowstone National Park. The 123 hikes range from 10,000-foot plateaus and peaks to treks along the Yellowstone River. The hikes lie within a 120-mile radius of Red Lodge, an active resort and ski town. A range of scenery and hike lengths are included, from relaxing creekside strolls to all-day, top-of-the-world outings. All hikes can be completed during the day. Map sources and references are listed for extending the hikes.
Winner of the Pacific Northwest Book Award “The best outdoors book of the year” —Sierra Club A New York Times Bestseller A Best Book of the Year—as chosen by The Boston Globe, The Seattle Times, Amazon, National Post, New York magazine, The Telegraph, Booklist, The Guardian Bookshop From a debut talent who’s been compared to Annie Dillard, Edward Abbey, David Quammen, and Jared Diamond, On Trails is a wondrous exploration of how trails help us understand the world—from invisible ant trails to hiking paths that span continents, from interstate highways to the Internet. In 2009, while thru-hiking the Appalachian Trail, Robert Moor began to wonder about the paths that lie beneath our feet: How do they form? Why do some improve over time while others fade? What makes us follow or strike off on our own? Over the course of the next seven years, Moor traveled the globe, exploring trails of all kinds, from the miniscule to the massive. He learned the tricks of master trail-builders, hunted down long-lost Cherokee trails, and traced the origins of our road networks and the Internet. In each chapter, Moor interweaves his adventures with findings from science, history, philosophy, and nature writing—combining the nomadic joys of Peter Matthiessen with the eclectic wisdom of Lewis Hyde’s The Gift. Throughout, Moor reveals how this single topic—the oft-overlooked trail—sheds new light on a wealth of age-old questions: How does order emerge out of chaos? How did animals first crawl forth from the seas and spread across continents? How has humanity’s relationship with nature and technology shaped world around us? And, ultimately, how does each of us pick a path through life? Moor has the essayist’s gift for making new connections, the adventurer’s love for paths untaken, and the philosopher’s knack for asking big questions. With a breathtaking arc that spans from the dawn of animal life to the digital era, On Trails is a book that makes us see our world, our history, our species, and our ways of life anew.
The American West has taken on a rich and evocative array of regional identities since the late nineteenth century. Wilderness wonderland, Hispanic borderland, homesteaderÕs frontier, cattle kingdom, urban dynamo, Native American homeland. Hell of a Vision explores the evolution of these diverse identities during the twentieth century, revealing how Western regionalism has been defined by generations of people seeking to understand the WestÕs vast landscapes and varied cultures. Focusing on the American West from the 1890s up to the present, Dorman provides us with a wide-ranging view of the impact of regionalist ideas in pop culture and diverse fields such as geography, land-use planning, anthropology, journalism, and environmental policy-making. Going well beyond the realm of literature, Dorman broadens the discussion by examining a unique mix of texts. He looks at major novelists such as Cather, Steinbeck, and Stegner, as well as leading Native American writers. But he also analyzes a variety of nonliterary sources in his book, such as government reports, planning documents, and environmental impact studies. Hell of a Vision is a compelling journey through the modern history of the American WestÑa key region in the nation of regions known as the United States.
This immense territory that would take many days to cross, had become a promise of surprises and wonders for us, together with the astonishing diversity of the countryside and climate. We deliberately chose to make it a trip to explore nature and not to travel conventionally. We opted to visit canyons, trees, lakes and places where nature displays its beauty and its strangeness. We wanted to see sights that nature generously promises us, like the burning deserts of Arizona, the striking sculptures of the different canyons in Colorado, the rugged Pacific Ocean coast in California and Oregon. And finally, the American National Parks as well as the parks of the different States, promised us numerous possible excursions. That is what we have realized during this voyage, and that we simply offer you with our best pictures. Bon voyage!
The author lovingly reconstructs the journey of eighteenth-century naturalist William Bartram, retracing his painstaking survey of the flora, fauna, and cultures of the American Southeast. (Travel)
In April 1992 a young man from a well-to-do family hitchhiked to Alaska and walked alone into the wilderness north of Mt. McKinley. His name was Christopher Johnson McCandless. He had given $25,000 in savings to charity, abandoned his car and most of his possessions, burned all the cash in his wallet, and invented a new life for himself. Four months later, his decomposed body was found by a moose hunter. How McCandless came to die is the unforgettable story of Into the Wild. Immediately after graduating from college in 1991, McCandless had roamed through the West and Southwest on a vision quest like those made by his heroes Jack London and John Muir. In the Mojave Desert he abandoned his car, stripped it of its license plates, and burned all of his cash. He would give himself a new name, Alexander Supertramp, and , unencumbered by money and belongings, he would be free to wallow in the raw, unfiltered experiences that nature presented. Craving a blank spot on the map, McCandless simply threw the maps away. Leaving behind his desperate parents and sister, he vanished into the wild. Jon Krakauer constructs a clarifying prism through which he reassembles the disquieting facts of McCandless's short life. Admitting an interst that borders on obsession, he searches for the clues to the dries and desires that propelled McCandless. Digging deeply, he takes an inherently compelling mystery and unravels the larger riddles it holds: the profound pull of the American wilderness on our imagination; the allure of high-risk activities to young men of a certain cast of mind; the complex, charged bond between fathers and sons. When McCandless's innocent mistakes turn out to be irreversible and fatal, he becomes the stuff of tabloid headlines and is dismissed for his naiveté, pretensions, and hubris. He is said to have had a death wish but wanting to die is a very different thing from being compelled to look over the edge. Krakauer brings McCandless's uncompromising pilgrimage out of the shadows, and the peril, adversity , and renunciation sought by this enigmatic young man are illuminated with a rare understanding--and not an ounce of sentimentality. Mesmerizing, heartbreaking, Into the Wild is a tour de force. The power and luminosity of Jon Krakauer's stoytelling blaze through every page. From the Trade Paperback edition.
DMCA - Contact