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This statistical volume contains data usually unavailable in other statistical publications. It gives statistics for two groups of countries in their 2007 borders. First, since year 1950 (for 1950, 1960, 1970, 1980, 1990, 2000, and 2007), it provides statistical data for all countries of the world (232 countries). Second, since year 1 AD (for 0001, 1000, 1500, 1600, 1700, 1820, 1870, 1880, 1890, 1900, 1913, 1920, 1929, and 1938), it provides data for a smaller group of countries (133 countries). This book is based on the groundbreaking works of Angus Maddison but it differs from his books in that it gives data up to the most recent year available and calculates GDP (gross and per capita) in the prices of that most recent year. For the recent years, the World Bank, CIA, and Encyclopedia Britannica were principal sources. But, despite the author's great debt to these sources, the preponderance of data in the book is not direct citations from them but rather the result of calculations. Among other computational techniques he uses a new logarithmic interpolation which takes care of cross-country statistical distortions when calculating in the prices of the most recent year. For every line of data (for every country, each year), he provides a note on the technique used in obtaining his estimate (i. e., proxy, exponential interpolation, direct estimate with source citation, etc.). Dr. Avakov's annual title Quality of Life, Balance of Powers, and Nuclear Weapons gives a current snapshot of world statistics. This new work, Two Thousand Years of Economic Statistics, gives the population and current price GDP data in a historical perspective.
Who's winning and who's losing? This book provides hard data for all who ponder the shifting sands of power, whether economic, military or demographic, and seek keys to decipher the media news. Going far beyond the major powers and the BRIC countries, this economic statistical work, issued every few years, presents historical statistics in nine sections. This is Volume 2, which lists (1) Population/Growth Rates of Population by country, (2) GDP Per Capita/Growth Rates of GDP Per Capita by country, and (3) GDP/Growth Rates of GDP by country. Volume 1 (sold separately) covers: (1) Population by rank, (2) GDP Per Capita by rank, (3) GDP by rank, (4) Growth Rates of Population by rank, (5) Growth Rates of GDP Per Capita by rank, (6) Growth Rates of GDP by rank. This biennial work contains data generally not available elsewhere, and in ways that help make it possible to draw useful comparisons. First, it provides statistical data for all countries of the world (236 countries, within their 2011 borders) since the year 1950 (by decade, with 2011 in addition), plus forecasts for 2020 and 2030. Second, it provides data for 135 countries since the year 1000 (with data for 1000, 1500, 1600, 1700, 1820, 1870, 1880, 1890, 1900, 1913, 1920, 1929, and 1938). Third, it provides data for 134 countries for the first year AD. In Volume 1 [572 pages], this data is arranged by rank, or size. In this, Volume 2 [438 pages], the countries are listed alphabetically. This book is based on the groundbreaking works of Angus Maddison but it gives data up to the most recent year available and calculates GDP (gross and per capita) in the prices of that year. For recent years, the World Bank, CIA, and Encyclopedia Britannica were principal sources. But, despite the author's great debt to these sources, the preponderance of data in the book is not direct citations from them but rather the result of calculations. Among other computational techniques he uses a new logarithmic interpolation which takes care of cross-country statistical distortions when calculating in the prices of the most recent year. For every line of data (for every country, each year), he provides a note on the technique used in obtaining his estimate (i.e., proxy, exponential interpolation, direct estimate with source citation, etc.). Dr. Avakov's annual title, "Quality of Life, Balance of Powers, and Nuclear Weapons," gives a current snapshot of world economic and military statistics. This work, "Two Thousand Years of Economic Statistics," gives world population figures and current GDP data in a historical perspective.

Who's winning and who's losing? This book provides hard data for all who ponder the shifting sands of power, whether economic, military or demographic, and seek keys to decipher the media news. Going far beyond the major powers and the BRIC countries, this economic statistical work, issued every few years, presents historical statistics in nine sections.

This is Volume 2, which lists (1) Population/Growth Rates of Population by country, (2) GDP Per Capita/Growth Rates of GDP Per Capita by country, and (3) GDP/Growth Rates of GDP by country.

Volume 1 (sold separately) covers: (1) Population by rank, (2) GDP Per Capita by rank, (3) GDP by rank, (4) Growth Rates of Population by rank, (5) Growth Rates of GDP Per Capita by rank, (6) Growth Rates of GDP by rank.

This biennial work contains data generally not available elsewhere, and in ways that help make it possible to draw useful comparisons.

First, it provides statistical data for all countries of the world (236 countries, within their 2011 borders) since the year 1950 (by decade, with 2011 in addition), plus forecasts for 2020 and 2030. Second, it provides data for 135 countries since the year 1000 (with data for 1000, 1500, 1600, 1700, 1820, 1870, 1880, 1890, 1900, 1913, 1920, 1929, and 1938). Third, it provides data for 134 countries for the first year AD.

In Volume 1 [572 pages], this data is arranged by rank, or size. In this, Volume 2 [438 pages], the countries are listed alphabetically.

This book is based on the groundbreaking works of Angus Maddison but it gives data up to the most recent year available and calculates GDP (gross and per capita) in the prices of that year.

For recent years, the World Bank, CIA, and Encyclopedia Britannica were principal sources. But, despite the author's great debt to these sources, the preponderance of data in the book is not direct citations from them but rather the result of calculations. Among other computational techniques he uses a new logarithmic interpolation which takes care of cross-country statistical distortions when calculating in the prices of the most recent year. For every line of data (for every country, each year), he provides a note on the technique used in obtaining his estimate (i.e., proxy, exponential interpolation, direct estimate with source citation, etc.).

Dr. Avakov's annual title, "Quality of Life, Balance of Powers, and Nuclear Weapons," gives a current snapshot of world economic and military statistics. This work, "Two Thousand Years of Economic Statistics," gives world population figures and current GDP data in a historical perspective.

How to sustain our world for future generations has perplexed us for centuries. We have reached a crossroads: we may choose the rocky path of responsibility or continue on the paved road of excess that promises hardship for our progeny. Independent efforts to resolve isolated issues are inadequate. Different from these efforts and from other books on the topic, this book uses systems thinking to understand the dominant forces that are shaping our hope for sustainability. It first describes a mental model - the bubble that holds our beliefs - that emerges from preponderant world views and explains current global trends. The model emphasizes economic growth and drives behavior toward short-term and self-motivated outcomes that thwart sustainability. The book then weaves statistical trends into a system diagram and shows how the economic, environmental, and societal contributors of sustainability interact. From this holistic perspective, it finds leverage points where actions can be most effective and combines eight areas of intervention into an integrated plan. By emphasizing both individual and collective actions, it addresses the conundrum of how to blend human nature with sustainability. Finally, it identifies primary three lessons we can learn by applying systems thinking to sustainability. Its metaphor-rich and accessible style makes the complex topic approachable and allows the reader to appreciate the intricate balance required to sustain life on Earth. Highlights the application of system thinking in economics Identifies systemic leveraging actions for achieving sustainability Outlines a comprehensive and integrated plan for achieving sustainable stewardship in the future
- Why have only 13 developing world economies achieved sustained, high growth since World War II? - Why is engagement with the global economy necessary to achieve high growth? - Why do some countries' growth strategies fail to win the public's confidence? - Why are equity and equality of opportunity important components of successful growth strategies? - Why do many countries, blessed with natural resource wealth, not achieve high growth? - Why has no country ever sustained rapid growth without high rates of public investment? - Why does it not always pay to devalue the exchange rate? When does it? - Why is childhood nutrition so important to economic growth? - Why do some economies lose momentum when others keep on growing? - Why has no country ever sustained long-term growth without urbanizing? - Why should there be an end to energy subsidies? - Why do global warming and the rising prices of food, energy and minerals pose challenges to potential future growth in developing countries? - Why does the aging of the world population matter for developing countries growth and employment prospects? 'The Growth Report' does not have all the answers, but it does identify some of the key insights and policy levers to help countries achieve high, sustainable and inclusive growth. The result of two years work by 19 experienced policymakers and two Nobel prize-winning economists, 'The Growth Report' is the most complete analysis to date of the ingredients which, if used in the right country-specific recipe, can deliver growth and help lift populations out of poverty. About the Commission on Growth and Development Launched in April 2006, the Commission on Growth and Development brings together twenty-one leading practitioners from government, business, and the policymaking arenas, mostly from the developing world. The Commission is chaired by Nobel Laureate Michael Spence, former Dean of the Stanford Graduate Business School, and Danny Leipziger, Vice-President, World Bank, is the Commission's Vice-Chair. Over a period of two years the Commission sought to gather the best understanding there is about the policies and strategies that underlie rapid and sustained economic growth and poverty reduction. The Commission's audience is the leaders of developing countries. The Commission is supported by the Governments of Australia, Sweden, the Netherlands, and United Kingdom, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, and the World Bank.
By comparing countries like Venezuela and Chile, China and India, Dominican Republic and Haiti, and others, the book tries to answer the questions of which institutions and policies are crucial for stable long term economic growth.
This publication shows the historical energy trends and the latest energy structures of 48 regional members, both the developed and developing members, of the Asian Development Bank. It contains energy demand and supply analysis, country energy profiles, and energy balance tables of each member country in the Asia and Pacific region.

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