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This book, the first of its kind to be published in English, introduces the reader to the rich heritage of Spanish song. Here in one volume are the texts of over 300 songs with parallel translations in accurate and readable English. The majority are love poems, which form a fascinating anthology of Spanish poetry from the thirteenth to the twentieth century. The introduction by Graham Johnson, who in recent years has done more than anyone to kindle interest in the international song repertoire, traces the history of Spanish song from its beginnings, via the period of the Catholic kings in the fifteenth century, the Golden Age of the sixteenth, through to the remarkable rebirth in the twentieth century. All the songs and cycles frequently heard in recital are gathered here: Albeniz, Falla, Granados, Rodrigo and Obradors are generously represented, as well as Catalan composers such as Montsalvatge and Mompou. The volume is arranged chronologically by composer, and includes notes on all the major poets and composers, a discography, and names and addresses of the music publishers. The Spanish Song Companion is a much-needed volume and will be welcomed by singers, students of Spanish literature, concert-goers and record-collectors throughout the English-speaking world.
Is the bilingual dictionary really the translator’s best friend? Or is it the case that all translators hate all dictionaries? The truth probably lies half-way. It is difficult to verify anyway, as the literature on the subject(s) is limited, not helped by the fact that Lexicography and Translation have stood apart for decades despite their commonality of purpose. Here is a volume, based on the proceedings of a successful conference at Hong Kong, that may at last provide some answers.
In the Western imagination, Spain often evokes the colorful culture of al-Andalus, the Iberian region once ruled by Muslims. Tourist brochures inviting visitors to sunny and romantic Andalusia, home of the ingenious gardens and intricate arabesques of Granada's Alhambra Palace, are not the first texts to trade on Spain's relationship to its Moorish past. Despite the fall of Granada to the Catholic Monarchs in 1492 and the subsequent repression of Islam in Spain, Moorish civilization continued to influence both the reality and the perception of the Christian nation that emerged in place of al-Andalus. In Exotic Nation, Barbara Fuchs explores the paradoxes in the cultural construction of Spain in relation to its Moorish heritage through an analysis of Spanish literature, costume, language, architecture, and chivalric practices. Between 1492 and the expulsion of the Moriscos (Muslims forcibly converted to Christianity) in 1609, Spain attempted to come to terms with its own Moorishness by simultaneously repressing Muslim subjects and appropriating their rich cultural heritage. Fuchs examines the explicit romanticization of the Moors in Spanish literature—often referred to as "literary maurophilia"—and the complex, often silent presence of Moorish forms in Spanish material culture. The extensive hybridization of Iberian culture suggests that the sympathetic depiction of Moors in the literature of the period does not trade in exoticism but instead reminded Spaniards of the place of Moors and their descendants within Spain. Meanwhile, observers from outside Spain recognized its cultural debt to al-Andalus, often deliberately casting Spain as the exotic racial other of Europe.
This study focuses on three basic questions: (1) Why is the Spanish-American novel nearly devoid of memorable female protagonists? (2) How do the novels portray their female characters? and (3) Why do even those novels whose titles promise female protagonists ultimately focus on other topics and characters?

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