Download Free Us Government Contractors And Human Trafficking Two Case Studies Of Iraq And Bosnia Herzegovina Springerbriefs In Criminology Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Us Government Contractors And Human Trafficking Two Case Studies Of Iraq And Bosnia Herzegovina Springerbriefs In Criminology and write the review.

This Brief examines the role of United States private military contractors (PMCs) in human trafficking and forced labor in case studies of Iraq and Bosnia-Herzegovina. Through the lens of these cases, the authors explore the legal and regulatory deficiencies surrounding PMCs in conflict zones, and the role of international criminal law in this context. It uses an integrative model of state corporate crime as a theoretical and analytical framework. This work will be of interest to researchers in criminology and criminal justice, as well as those involved in the field of criminal law and human rights law, as well as political science. It will also be of interest for policy makers, legislators and others working in international law and diplomacy.
This Brief discusses the role of state-level criminal justice organizations in the prevention and control of crime and delinquency. State agencies play an important role in translating criminological knowledge into criminal justice policy and practice. Their unique position enables them to help bridge the divide between the academic and federal agencies, and local communities that need the knowledge. Using several examples, the author shows how state agencies have facilitated translation with varying degrees of success. The agencies covered include: state police/patrol, attorneys general, adult and juvenile corrections, and state criminal justice planning agencies. To a lesser extent they also include statewide organizations representing law enforcement, prosecutors, judges, probation and parole officers, crime prevention professionals, and victim advocates. Most statewide criminal justice organizations are in an excellent position to translate criminological theory and research into policy and practice. Some, like those administering federal monies, to an extent are forced into the translation role for their constituents. Others, such as departments of corrections, do so out of necessity or because of enlightened leadership. Still others, such as state criminal justice planning agencies, provide leadership in translation because of the broad umbrella of their responsibilities and the incentives their pass-though dollars represent. Regardless, state agencies provide an important link between academic institutions and the federal government on one hand, and local criminal justice agencies on the other.​ This Brief provides and important resource for navigating that link.
This contributed volume explores and reveals the dynamics, strengths and weaknesses, trends and implications of entrepreneurship in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. Presenting papers by respected experts in the field, it shares essential insights on the status quo of entrepreneurship and the opportunities and threats it faces in the MENA region. Topics range from development of entrepreneurial universities to international entrepreneurship, as well as emergent topics such as green entrepreneurship, sustainable entrepreneurship and youth entrepreneurship.
Understanding Sexual Violence examines the structural supports for rape in sexually violent cultures and dispels a number of myths about sexual violence--for example, that childhood abuse, alcohol, and drugs are direct causes of rape.
The insightful essays in this book shine a new light on the roles of women within criminal networks, roles that in reality are often less traditional than researchers used to think. The book seeks to answer questions from a wide range of academic disciplines and traces the portrait of women tied to organized crime in Italy and around the world. The book offers up accounts of mafia women, and also tales of severe abuse and violence against women.
Systematic reviews aim to minimize any possible bias in drawing conclusions by stating explicit criteria for inclusion and exclusion of studies, by conducting extensive and wide-ranging searches for possibly eligible studies, and by making all stages of the review explicit and transparent so that the methods can be checked and replicated. Over a decade ago, a concerted effort was made by members of the criminology community, including the Editors and contributors of this volume, to bring the practice of systematic reviews to the study of Criminology, providing replicable, evidence-based data to answer key questions about the study of crime causation, detection, and prevention. Now, the pioneers in this effort present a comprehensive stock-taking of what has been learned in the past decade of systematic reviews in criminology. Much has been discovered about the effectiveness of (for example) boot camps, “hot spots” policing, closed-circuit television surveillance, neighborhood watch, anti-bullying programs in schools, early parenting programs, drug treatment programs, and other key topics. This ambitious volume aims to bring together and assess all major systematic reviews of the effectiveness of criminological interventions, to draw broad conclusions about what works in policing, corrections, developmental prevention, situational prevention, drug abuse treatments, sentencing and deterrence, and communities. It will be of interest to researchers in criminology and criminal justice, as well as in related fields such as public health and forensic science, with important implications for policy-makers and practitioners. Decisively showing that the “nothing works” era is over, this volume takes stock of what we know, and still need to know, to prevent crime. Focusing on different areas of prevention, individual chapters provide a state-of–the art analysis of the extent evaluation evidence. Together, they comprise an essential guide to improving both public safety and the lives of those most at risk of criminal involvement. I plan to keep this book close at hand and to use if often! Francis T. Cullen, Distinguished Research Professor Emeritus, University of Cincinnati This impressive volume, edited by Weisburd, Farrington and Gill, provides a comprehensive picture of what we’ve learned from systematic reviews about “what works” in addressing crime – and goes on to identify the “next step” issues that demand attention if the field is to move forward. At a time when there is a broad commitment to bringing science to the front lines of practice, this book should be on the reading list of both policymakers and scholars. Laurie O. Robinson, Clarence J. Robinson Professor of Criminology, Law Society, George Mason University and former Assistant Attorney General of the U.S. Department of Justice

Best Books

DMCA - Contact