Download Free Vector Analysis Versus Vector Calculus Universitext Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Vector Analysis Versus Vector Calculus Universitext and write the review.

The aim of this book is to facilitate the use of Stokes' Theorem in applications. The text takes a differential geometric point of view and provides for the student a bridge between pure and applied mathematics by carefully building a formal rigorous development of the topic and following this through to concrete applications in two and three variables. Key topics include vectors and vector fields, line integrals, regular k-surfaces, flux of a vector field, orientation of a surface, differential forms, Stokes' theorem, and divergence theorem. This book is intended for upper undergraduate students who have completed a standard introduction to differential and integral calculus for functions of several variables. The book can also be useful to engineering and physics students who know how to handle the theorems of Green, Stokes and Gauss, but would like to explore the topic further.
Volume III sets out classical Cauchy theory. It is much more geared towards its innumerable applications than towards a more or less complete theory of analytic functions. Cauchy-type curvilinear integrals are then shown to generalize to any number of real variables (differential forms, Stokes-type formulas). The fundamentals of the theory of manifolds are then presented, mainly to provide the reader with a "canonical'' language and with some important theorems (change of variables in integration, differential equations). A final chapter shows how these theorems can be used to construct the compact Riemann surface of an algebraic function, a subject that is rarely addressed in the general literature though it only requires elementary techniques. Besides the Lebesgue integral, Volume IV will set out a piece of specialized mathematics towards which the entire content of the previous volumes will converge: Jacobi, Riemann, Dedekind series and infinite products, elliptic functions, classical theory of modular functions and its modern version using the structure of the Lie algebra of SL(2,R).
This second English edition of a very popular two-volume work presents a thorough first course in analysis, leading from real numbers to such advanced topics as differential forms on manifolds; asymptotic methods; Fourier, Laplace, and Legendre transforms; elliptic functions; and distributions. Especially notable in this course are the clearly expressed orientation toward the natural sciences and the informal exploration of the essence and the roots of the basic concepts and theorems of calculus. Clarity of exposition is matched by a wealth of instructive exercises, problems, and fresh applications to areas seldom touched on in textbooks on real analysis. The main difference between the second and first English editions is the addition of a series of appendices to each volume. There are six of them in the first volume and five in the second. The subjects of these appendices are diverse. They are meant to be useful to both students (in mathematics and physics) and teachers, who may be motivated by different goals. Some of the appendices are surveys, both prospective and retrospective. The final survey establishes important conceptual connections between analysis and other parts of mathematics. This second volume presents classical analysis in its current form as part of a unified mathematics. It shows how analysis interacts with other modern fields of mathematics such as algebra, differential geometry, differential equations, complex analysis, and functional analysis. This book provides a firm foundation for advanced work in any of these directions.
This book presents the fundamentals of modern tensor calculus for students in engineering and applied physics, emphasizing those aspects that are crucial for applying tensor calculus safely in Euclidian space and for grasping the very essence of the smooth manifold concept. After introducing the subject, it provides a brief exposition on point set topology to familiarize readers with the subject, especially with those topics required in later chapters. It then describes the finite dimensional real vector space and its dual, focusing on the usefulness of the latter for encoding duality concepts in physics. Moreover, it introduces tensors as objects that encode linear mappings and discusses affine and Euclidean spaces. Tensor analysis is explored first in Euclidean space, starting from a generalization of the concept of differentiability and proceeding towards concepts such as directional derivative, covariant derivative and integration based on differential forms. The final chapter addresses the role of smooth manifolds in modeling spaces other than Euclidean space, particularly the concepts of smooth atlas and tangent space, which are crucial to understanding the topic. Two of the most important concepts, namely the tangent bundle and the Lie derivative, are subsequently worked out.
This short book provides a comprehensive and unified treatment of time-varying vector fields under a variety of regularity hypotheses, namely finitely differentiable, Lipschitz, smooth, holomorphic, and real analytic. The presentation of this material in the real analytic setting is new, as is the manner in which the various hypotheses are unified using functional analysis. Indeed, a major contribution of the book is the coherent development of locally convex topologies for the space of real analytic sections of a vector bundle, and the development of this in a manner that relates easily to classically known topologies in, for example, the finitely differentiable and smooth cases. The tools used in this development will be of use to researchers in the area of geometric functional analysis.
An entire generation of mathematicians has grown up during the time - tween the appearance of the ?rst edition of this textbook and the publication of the fourth edition, a translation of which is before you. The book is fam- iar to many people, who either attended the lectures on which it is based or studied out of it, and who now teach others in universities all over the world. I am glad that it has become accessible to English-speaking readers. This textbook consists of two parts. It is aimed primarily at university students and teachers specializing in mathematics and natural sciences, and at all those who wish to see both the rigorous mathematical theory and examplesofitse?ectiveuseinthesolutionofrealproblemsofnaturalscience. The textbook exposes classical analysis as it is today, as an integral part of Mathematics in its interrelations with other modern mathematical courses such as algebra, di?erential geometry, di?erential equations, complex and functional analysis.

Best Books