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Why do offenders use violence? This is one of the most frequently asked questions and one that is explored directly through an analysis of 123 accounts of violent property crime.This book puts the rise in acquisitive crimes in a social context and asks questions about the needs of young males in Australian society. It also contains an analysis of approaches to crime prevention.Professor Frank Zimring, Director of the Earl Warren Legal Institute at the University of California, Berkeley, says in his foreword to this important study:"The multi-faceted and detailed report is of interest to a general audience for two reasons. It provides information on risks and patterns of crime that hold true for the rest of Australia. It also provides a model of the kind of work that is needed when hard questions must be asked about the nature and cost of crime in a specific setting."
An examination of the relationship between sentencing law and policy as it has evolved in Victoria over more than a century. In this major addition to the Australasian Studies in Criminology Series, the authors outline the relationship between sentencing reform and penal change: how sentencing systems develop and operate; how and why certain sanctions are created, how they are implemented and how they interact with each other. The authors argue that legislative sentencing reform and its effects can only be understood as one element in a larger set of institutional, political and demographic factors which influence the criminal justice system as a whole. They draw comparisons with other Australian States and experience overseas where their findings and analysis have great relevance.
This book assesses the principles and practices of family group conferences in the juvenile justice and child protection systems. All the chapters emphasise the values which distinguish family group conferences from conventional mechanisms for making decisions about young people who are either in need of care and protection or who commit offences: respecting the integrity of the family unit; including the extended family; strengthening family and community supports; sharing power between the state and families; creating opportunities for parents to feel responsible for their children and themselves; and showing sensitivity and respect for families cultures.
Digital technology has transformed the way in which we socialise and do business. Proving the maxim that crime follows opportunity, virtually every advance has been accompanied by a corresponding niche to be exploited for criminal purposes; so-called 'cybercrimes'. Whether it be fraud, child pornography, stalking, criminal copyright infringement or attacks on computers themselves, criminals will find ways to exploit new technology. The challenge for all countries is to ensure their criminal laws keep pace. The challenge is a global one, and much can be learned from the experience of other jurisdictions. Focusing on Australia, Canada, the UK and the USA, this book provides a comprehensive analysis of the legal principles that apply to the prosecution of cybercrimes. This new edition has been fully revised to take into account changes in online offending, as well as new case law and legislation in this rapidly developing area of the law.
In countries with democratic traditions, police interactions with the mentally ill are usually guided by legislative mandates giving police discretion and possibly resulting in referrals for assistance and treatment. But all too frequently, the outcome of these interactions is far less therapeutic and leads to a cycle of arrests and ultimately incarceration. Stemming from an initiative in Memphis, Tennessee two decades ago, police departments in many parts of the world have set up specific programs with crisis intervention teams to facilitate police contact with the mentally ill. Policing and the Mentally Ill: International Perspectives examines how these types of programs have fared in jurisdictions across the world. The book begins with developments in North America and Europe—traditionally the locus of much of the innovation and change in policing and related areas. It demonstrates how a number of jurisdictions in Europe have only recently begun to recognize therapeutic intervention with the mentally ill as a priority issue, and still frequently suffer from a lack of significant resources. The largest section of the book focuses on Australia, where local law enforcement agencies have displayed a remarkable enthusiasm for and commitment to change in their management of interactions with citizens with mental illness. Finally, the book examines the particular challenges of providing humane and effective policing for persons with mental illnesses in parts of the developing world. These challenges often involve dealing with entrenched cultural beliefs and practices based on superstition, fear, and prejudice regarding persons thought to be mentally ill. Interactions between police and persons with mental illnesses comprise an important and sensitive aspect of everyday policing. The 16 chapters in this book offer a wide range of cross-cultural perspectives on this essential aspect of policing, enabling police practitioners to develop a best practices approach to managing their interactions with this vulnerable segment of the community.

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