Download Free Voices Of Diversity Multi Culturalism In America Clinical Sociology Research And Practice Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Voices Of Diversity Multi Culturalism In America Clinical Sociology Research And Practice and write the review.

The 21st century sees an increasing number of cultural minorities in the United States. Particularly, the rise in multi-cultural or mixed heritage families is on the rise. As with many trends, just as the amount of diversity increases, so does the level of resistance in groups that oppose this diversity. While this problem exists through life for persons from multicultural backgrounds, the tension is particularly acute for children, whose identities and socialization experiences are still in formation. With parents from different cultural backgrounds, as well as school and community experiences giving that might question their diverse heritage, children are likely to experience distressing confusion. How can they come to terms with this conflict, and how can family and community help them to resolve it? Combining case studies and interviews, this work particularly focuses on multi-cultural families as a yet untapped source of information about inter-culture contact. Voices of Diversity: Multiculturalism in America will be both a resource for researchers and practitioners, as well as a practical guide to families dealing with these issues every day.
"Culture counts" has long been a rallying cry among health advocates and policymakers concerned with racial disparities in health care. A generation ago, the women’s health movement led to a host of changes that also benefited racial minorities, including more culturally aware medical staff, enhanced health education, and the mandated inclusion of women and minorities in federally funded research. Many health professionals would now agree that cultural competence is important in clinical settings, but in what ways? Shattering Culture provides an insightful view of medicine and psychiatry as they are practiced in today’s culturally diverse clinical settings. The book offers a compelling account of the many ways culture shapes how doctors conduct their practices and how patients feel about the care they receive. Based on interviews with clinicians, health care staff, and patients, Shattering Culture shows the human face of health care in America. Building on over a decade of research led by Mary-Jo Good, the book delves into the cultural backgrounds of patients and their health care providers, as well as the institutional cultures of clinical settings, to illuminate how these many cultures interact and shape the quality of patient care. Sarah Willen explores the controversial practice of matching doctors and patients based on a shared race, ethnicity, or language and finds a spectrum of arguments challenging its usefulness, including patients who may fear being judged negatively by providers from the same culture. Seth Hannah introduces the concept of cultural environments of hyperdiversity describing complex cultural identities. Antonio Bullon and Mary-Jo Good demonstrate how regulations meant to standardize the caregiving process—such as the use of templates and check boxes instead of narrative notes—have steadily limited clinician flexibility, autonomy, and the time they can dedicate to caring for patients. Elizabeth Carpenter-Song looks at positive doctor-patient relationships in mental health care settings and finds that the most successful of these are based on mutual “recognition”—patients who can express their concerns and clinicians who validate them. In the book’s final essay, Hannah, Good, and Park show how navigating the maze of insurance regulations, financial arrangements, and paperwork compromises the effectiveness of mental health professionals seeking to provide quality care to minority and poor patients. Rapidly increasing diversity on one hand and bureaucratic regulations on the other are two realities that have made providing culturally sensitive care even more challenging for doctors. Few opportunities exist to go inside the world of medical and mental health clinics and see how these realities are influencing patient care. Shattering Culture provides a rare look at the day-to-day experiences of psychiatrists and other clinicians and offers multiple perspectives on what culture means to doctors, staff, and patients and how it shapes the practice of medicine and psychiatry.
This ebook is a selective guide designed to help scholars and students of social work find reliable sources of information by directing them to the best available scholarly materials in whatever form or format they appear from books, chapters, and journal articles to online archives, electronic data sets, and blogs. Written by a leading international authority on the subject, the ebook provides bibliographic information supported by direct recommendations about which sources to consult and editorial commentary to make it clear how the cited sources are interrelated related. A reader will discover, for instance, the most reliable introductions and overviews to the topic, and the most important publications on various areas of scholarly interest within this topic. In social work, as in other disciplines, researchers at all levels are drowning in potentially useful scholarly information, and this guide has been created as a tool for cutting through that material to find the exact source you need. This ebook is a static version of an article from Oxford Bibliographies Online: Social Work, a dynamic, continuously updated, online resource designed to provide authoritative guidance through scholarship and other materials relevant to the study and practice of social work. Oxford Bibliographies Online covers most subject disciplines within the social science and humanities, for more information visit www.aboutobo.com.
First published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
This timely book brings together experts from around the world to share expertise and best practice to form an eclectic collection of the best approaches for teaching gifted and talented children from different cultures. Each chapter: presents an overview of international perspectives on the issues of multi-cultural and gifted education examines the critical issues related to cultural definitions of giftedness in programming for diverse gifted students presents regional case studies in order to inform practitioners' best practice examines issues of access for gifted students in relation to culture, poverty, race and gender. In addition, details of websites and associations which offer support and advice are also provided, making this book an invaluable resource for academics, researchers, teachers and parents of gifted and talented children.
Moving away from the usual medical-modeled framework of mental health focused on problems, Strengths-Based Supervision in Clinical Practice by Jeffrey K. Edwards takes a postmodern, social construction approach, looking for and amplifying strengths and encouraging stakeholders to use them. Based on research in brain science, as well as from the Information Age/Connectivity Age thinking, the book reframes the focus of supervision, management, and leadership to one that collaborates and builds on strengths with supervisees as competent stakeholders in their work with their clients.

Best Books

DMCA - Contact