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Renowned education journalist Ronald A. Wolk--the founder and former editor of "Education Week" and "Teacher Magazine"--skewers the conventional wisdom of the day about education reform and illuminates a way forward to higher student achievement. Learn why so many assumptions guiding political and educational leaders--standards and testing, longer school days/years, pushing advanced math classes--have little prospect of achieving results. And explore a new strategy forward following promising innovations such as individualizing instruction, performance assessments, and restructuring public education. This book is divided into two parts. Part I, Flawed Assumptions, includes the following chapters: (1) The "Get-Tough" Policy; (2) All Standards for All Students; (3) If It Moves, Test It; (4) Make Them Take Algebra; (5) Wanted: Great Teachers; (6) The Quest for the Supreme Leader; (7) The Dropout Epidemic; (8) Time for What?; (9) Never Enough Money; and (10) a New Strategy of New Schools. Part ii, a Second, Parallel Strategy, includes the following chapters: (11) One Student at a Time; (12) Many Pathways to Success; (13) Life to Text; (14) It's the Work That Counts; (15) Start Them Early; (16) a New Role for Teachers; (17) a Matter of Choice; (18) Schools for Digital Natives; and (19) Conclusion: Can We Get There from Here?. Preface, introduction, references, related ascd resources and a study guide for this book are also included.
You know students need to acquire 21st century skills. But how do you work those skills into the curriculum? Learn how to use the content you already teach to challenge students to think critically, collaborate with others, solve new problems, and adapt to change across new learning contexts. Help students build the seven habitudes—habits of disciplined decisions and specific attitudes—they need to succeed.
The Promise of Integrated and Multicultural Bilingual Education presents the results of a long-term ethnographic study of the integrated bilingual Palestinian-Jewish schools in Israel that offer a new educational option to two groups of Israelis--Palestinians and Jews--who have been in conflict for the last one hundred years. Their goal is to create egalitarian bilingual multicultural environments to facilitate the growth of youth who can acknowledge and respect "others" while maintaining loyalty to their respective cultural traditions. In this book, Bekerman reveals the complex school practices implemented while negotiating identity and culture in contexts of enduring conflict. Data gathered from interviews with teachers, students, parents, and state officials are presented and analyzed to explore the potential and limitations of peace education given the cultural resources, ethnic-religious affiliations, political beliefs, and historical narratives of the various interactants. The book concludes with critique of Western positivist paradigmatic perspectives that currently guide peace education, maintaining that one of the primary weaknesses of current bilingual and multicultural approaches to peace education is their failure to account for the primacy of the political framework of the nation state and the psychologized educational perspectives that guide their educational work. Change, it is argued, will only occur after these perspectives are abandoned, which entails critically reviewing present understandings of the individual, of identity and culture, and of the learning process.
This book explores the philosophical, ideological and practical dimensions of curriculum using an intercultural lens. It is cross-cultural, comparative and inclusive, with each chapter featuring case studies from a minimum of three countries across different continents. By using the same methods of data collection and analysis for each country level in each chapter, the text explores relationships of curriculum theory, policy and practice both within and between countries. A diverse range of themes is explored, including; social justice and teacher preparation curriculum, language education curriculum, early childhood education and music, curriculum as praxis, curriculum and globalisation, science curriculum, teacher leadership in curriculum implementation, as well as curriculum and history. The exploration of these themes lays the foundation for open dialogue and innovative approaches in exploring curriculum issues within, between and across cultures and contexts.
Brook Thomas explores the new historicism and the challenges posed to it by a postmodern world that questions the very possibility of newness. He considers new historicism's engagement with poststructuralism and locates the former within a tradition of pragmatic historiography in the United States.
With all the talk of failing schools these days, we forget that schools can fail their brightest students, too. We pledge to "leave no child behind," but in American schools today, thousands of gifted and talented students fall short of their potential. In Genius Denied, Jan and Bob Davidson describe the "quiet crisis" in education: gifted students spending their days in classrooms learning little beyond how to cope with boredom as they "relearn" material they've already mastered years before. This lack of challenge leads to frustration, underachievement, and even failure. Some gifted students become severely depressed. At a time when our country needs a deep intellectual talent pool, the squandering of these bright young minds is a national tragedy. There are hundreds of thousands of highly gifted children in the U.S. and millions more whose intelligence is above average, yet few receive the education they deserve. Many school districts have no gifted programs or offer only token enrichment classes. Education of the gifted is in this sorry state, say the Davidsons, because of indifference, lack of funding, and the pernicious notion that education should have a "leveling" effect, a one-size-fits-all concept that deliberately ignores the needs of the gifted. But all children are entitled to an appropriate education, insist the authors, those left behind as well as those who want to surge ahead. The Davidsons show parents and educators how to reach and challenge gifted students. They offer practical advice based on their experience as founders of a nonprofit organization that assists gifted children. They show parents how to become their children's advocates, how to win support for gifted students within the local schools, and when and how to go outside the school system. They discuss everything from acceleration ("skipping" a grade) to homeschooling and finding mentors for children. They tell stories of real parents and students who overcame poor schooling environments to discover the joy of learning. Genius Denied is an inspiring book that provides a beacon of hope for children at risk of losing their valuable gift of intellectual potential.

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