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When People Come First critically assesses the expanding field of global health. It brings together an international and interdisciplinary group of scholars to address the medical, social, political, and economic dimensions of the global health enterprise through vivid case studies and bold conceptual work. The book demonstrates the crucial role of ethnography as an empirical lantern in global health, arguing for a more comprehensive, people-centered approach. Topics include the limits of technological quick fixes in disease control, the moral economy of global health science, the unexpected effects of massive treatment rollouts in resource-poor contexts, and how right-to-health activism coalesces with the increased influence of the pharmaceutical industry on health care. The contributors explore the altered landscapes left behind after programs scale up, break down, or move on. We learn that disease is really never just one thing, technology delivery does not equate with care, and biology and technology interact in ways we cannot always predict. The most effective solutions may well be found in people themselves, who consistently exceed the projections of experts and the medical-scientific, political, and humanitarian frameworks in which they are cast. When People Come First sets a new research agenda in global health and social theory and challenges us to rethink the relationships between care, rights, health, and economic futures.
"Rapid social change is the one constant in this ambitious volume. These pages come to life and are wrenching because they never seek to elide the messiness of experience. With ethnographic evidence from some of the most important theaters of global health, the authors give us a sound understanding of the collision of a crushing burden of disease, emerging audit cultures, and new therapeutic regimes. As case studies rooted in long familiarity but alive to overwhelming transformation, they will stand the test of time."--Paul Farmer, Harvard Medical School and Partners in Health "Award-winning medical anthropologists Joao Biehl and Adriana Petryna have produced a stunning and original collection. In an era of market-driven global health interventions, this volume demonstrates anthropology's unique contribution as a critically evaluative and humanizing discipline."--Marcia C. Inhorn, Yale University "Global health as a field is being redefined, from one based on narrow interventions to a more holistic focus on delivering value to patients. This requires a deep understanding of how to connect care delivery to patients, their families, and the local country context. "When People Come First" is an indispensable resource in creating the global health delivery systems of the future. Its rich case studies are essential for practitioners and scholars in designing and implementing care processes that really work."--Michael E. Porter, Harvard Business School "Global health is a big business: the World Bank, the World Health Organization, the United Nations, the Gates Foundation, academia, pharmaceutical companies, and thousands of NGOs are working to improve health around the world. Lost among these powerful groups, the supposed beneficiaries have little to say. "When People Come First" tells us why and how to make global health better. It is an eye-opener, especially for those of us locked into our comfortable disciplinary silos."--Angus Deaton, Princeton University ""When People Come First" is a truly pioneering volume that will change the kind of work that is done in the anthropology of global health in the future."--Richard G. Parker, Columbia University ""When People Come First" sets an ambitious agenda that emphasizes ethnography as an important methodological tool for better understanding health services at all levels of analysis, including at the stages of service provision, medicine marketing, and policymaking. There is no doubt that this book will be read and widely cited by scholars of global health."--Nitsan Chorev, Brown University
When People Come First critically assesses the expanding field of global health. It brings together an international and interdisciplinary group of scholars to address the medical, social, political, and economic dimensions of the global health enterprise through vivid case studies and bold conceptual work. The book demonstrates the crucial role of ethnography as an empirical lantern in global health, arguing for a more comprehensive, people-centered approach. Topics include the limits of technological quick fixes in disease control, the moral economy of global health science, the unexpected effects of massive treatment rollouts in resource-poor contexts, and how right-to-health activism coalesces with the increased influence of the pharmaceutical industry on health care. The contributors explore the altered landscapes left behind after programs scale up, break down, or move on. We learn that disease is really never just one thing, technology delivery does not equate with care, and biology and technology interact in ways we cannot always predict. The most effective solutions may well be found in people themselves, who consistently exceed the projections of experts and the medical-scientific, political, and humanitarian frameworks in which they are cast. When People Come First sets a new research agenda in global health and social theory and challenges us to rethink the relationships between care, rights, health, and economic futures.
Bringing together the experience, perspective and expertise of Paul Farmer, Jim Yong Kim, and Arthur Kleinman, Reimagining Global Health provides an original, compelling introduction to the field of global health. Drawn from a Harvard course developed by their student Matthew Basilico, this work provides an accessible and engaging framework for the study of global health. Insisting on an approach that is historically deep and geographically broad, the authors underline the importance of a transdisciplinary approach, and offer a highly readable distillation of several historical and ethnographic perspectives of contemporary global health problems. The case studies presented throughout Reimagining Global Health bring together ethnographic, theoretical, and historical perspectives into a wholly new and exciting investigation of global health. The interdisciplinary approach outlined in this text should prove useful not only in schools of public health, nursing, and medicine, but also in undergraduate and graduate classes in anthropology, sociology, political economy, and history, among others.
In this lesson-packed book, Mark Nichter, one of the worldÕs leading medical anthropologists, summarizes what more than a quarter-century of health social science research has contributed to international health and elucidates what social science research can contribute to global health and the study of biopolitics in the future. Nichter focuses on our cultural understanding of infectious and vector-borne diseases, how they are understood locally, and how various populations respond to public health interventions. The book examines the perceptions of three groups whose points of view on illness, health care, and the politics of responsibility often differ and frequently conflict: local populations living in developing countries, public health practitioners working in international health, and health planners/policy makers. The book is written for both health social scientists working in the fields of international health and development and public health practitioners interested in learning practical lessons they can put to good use when engaging communities in participatory problem solving. Global Health critically examines representations that frame international health discourse. It also addresses the politics of what is possible in a world compelled to work together to face emerging and re-emerging diseases, the control of health threats associated with political ecology and defective modernization, and the rise of new assemblages of people who share a sense of biosociality. The book proposes research priorities for a new program of health social science research. Nichter calls for greater involvement by social scientists in studies of global health and emphasizes how medical anthropologists in particular can better involve themselves as scholar activists.
This volume's contributors evaluate the accomplishments, limits, and consequences of using quantitative metrics in global health. Whether analyzing maternal mortality rates, the relationships between political goals and metrics data, or the links between health outcomes and a program's fiscal support, the contributors question the ability of metrics to solve global health problems. They capture a moment when global health scholars and practitioners must evaluate the potential effectiveness and pitfalls of different metrics—even as they remain elusive and problematic. Contributors. Vincanne Adams, Susan Erikson, Molly Hales, Pierre Minn, Adeola Oni-Orisan, Carolyn Smith-Morris, Marlee Tichenor, Lily Walkover, Claire L. Wendland
Diplomacy is undergoing profound changes in the 21st century, and global health is one of the areas where this is most apparent. The negotiation processes that shape and manage the global policy environment for health are increasingly conducted not only between public health experts representing health ministries of nation states but include many other major players at the national level and in the global arena. These include philanthropists and public-private players. As health moves beyond its purely technical realm to become an ever more critical element in foreign policy, security policy, and trade agreements, new skills are needed to negotiate global regimes, international agreements and treaties, and to maintain relations with a wide range of actors. The intent of this book is to provide learning tools for today's broad group of “new health diplomats” in the landscape of this ever-shifting, complex technical and political arena. The case studies are told as the negotiations were experienced by individuals who participated in the various debates, dialogues, negotiations, or by experts who have studied them. This collection fills an important gap in both knowledge and practice providing insight on how negotiations on global health issues have transpired, the successes, challenges, failures, tools and frameworks for negotiation, mechanisms of policy coherence, ways to achieve global health objectives internationally, and how global health diplomacy used as a foreign policy tool can improve relations between nations. Contents:Introduction: The Art and Practice of Conducting Global Health Negotiations in the 21st Century (Ilona Kickbusch and Ellen Rosskam)Navigating the Negotiating Space Between Geneva and New York: A Case Study in Foreign Policy and Global Health (Luvuyo Ndimeni)Public Health Diplomacy in the WTO: Experience from Developing Countries in Negotiations on Health and Related Services in GATS and Issues Related to Public Health in TRIPS (Ahmad Mukhtar)Negotiating the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control: Public Health Joins the Arcane World of Multilateral Diplomacy (Kenneth W Bernard)Negotiating the Revised International Health Regulations (IHR) (Rebecca Katz and Anna Muldoon)Transformative Diplomacy: Negotiation of the WHO Global Code of Practice on the International Recruitment of Health Personnel (Allyn L Taylor and Ibadat S Dhillon)Negotiating Issues Related to Pandemic Influenza Preparedness: The Sharing of Influenza Viruses and Access to Vaccines and Other Benefits (John E Lange)Negotiating Equitable Access to Influenza Vaccines: Global Health Diplomacy and the Controversies Surrounding Avian Influenza H5N1 and Pandemic Influenza H1N1 (David P Fidler)Preparing for Health Diplomacy Negotiations — Global Governance and the Case of Taiwan, WHO, and SARS (Bryan A Liang and Tim Mackey)China's Engagement with Global Health Diplomacy: Was SARS a Watershed? (Lai-Ha Chan, Lucy Chen and Jin Xu)Destruction of the Smallpox Virus Stocks: Negotiating for Consensus in the World Health Organization (Jonathan B Tucker)Negotiating in the World Health Organization: The Intergovernmental Working Group on Intellectual Property, Innovation, and Public Health (Howard A Zucker)Taking the Fight Beyond Official Negotiations: Stakeholders Mobilise Against Counterfeit Drugs (James N Class)Global Health Workforce Alliance: Negotiating for Access to Health Workers for All (Mubashar Sheikh and Muhammad Mahmood Afzal)The US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief: Negotiating a Recreation in Global Health and Development (Mark Dybul)Negotiating ARV Prices with Pharmaceutical Companies and the South African Government: A Civil Society/Legal Approach (Christopher J Colvin and Mark Heywood)Negotiating Health Reform in Kyrgyzstan: Government Management of Donors and Stakeholders (Judyth L Twigg)Yellow Fever and Health Diplomacy: International Efforts to Stop the Urban Yellow Fever Outbreak in Paraguay (Jon Kim Andrus, Alba María Ropero, Gladys Ghisays, Stacy Romero, Barbara Jauregui and Cuauhtemoc Ruiz Matus)Diplomacy and the Polio Immunization Boycott in Northern Nigeria (Judith R Kaufmann and Harley Feldbaum) Readership: Global health and international health programs in: universities, hospitals, foundations, government agencies, NGOs (addressing trade, health, specific diseases, pharmaceuticals, agriculture, climate change), research institutes, think tanks, international organizations. Diplomats in Ministries of Health, Ministries of Foreign Affairs, Departments of State, government departments of public health, Ministries of Trade and Commerce, and firms that conduct lobbying for special interest groups on issues related to pharmaceuticals, health related issues, trade, technology related to health, climate change, and international health.

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