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War, oppression, and injustice define reality for vast numbers of the world's people. In the last one hundred years alone, more that 200 million people have been killed as a consequence of systematic repression, political revolutions, ethnic or religious war. The legacy of such violence lingers long after the immediate conflict subsides, often begetting subsequent waves of conflict well before any real and lasting reconciliation has taken place. Drawing on the experiences of his native El Salvador, the author puts the insights of Latin American liberation theology in service of a systematic study of reconciliation. This first book-length study to propose a liberationist theology of reconciliation builds on Jon Sobrino's Christology to construct a Christian discipleship inspired by Jesus' merciful praxis and the eschatological values of God's Kingdom. This spirituality prioritizes the contribution of the victims in the process of reconciliation and envisions a Christian praxis that upholds both the need for personal forgiveness and the social restoration of justice without favoring one value at the expense of the other. The book urges Christians to follow the structure of Jesus' life and to engage conflicted reality with the same spirit of honesty, fidelity, and trust that empowered his life. In turn, this reconciling spirituality sets the foundations for a theology of reconciliation from a liberationist perspective: one that is rooted in God's revealed truth, mercy, and justice. This thorough effort to offer the insights of Christian Liberation theology to the struggle for social reconciliation brings a fresh and vital vision to the urgent and necessary discussion of social reconciliation.
Much like the rest of the country, American Catholics are politically divided, perhaps more so now than at any point in their history. In this learned but accessible work for scholars, students, and religious and lay readers, ethicist Julie Hanlon Rubio suggests that there is a way beyond red versus blue for orthodox and progressive Catholics. In a call for believers on both sides of the liberal-conservative divide to put aside labels and rhetoric, Rubio, a leading scholar in marriage and family for more than twenty years, demonstrates that common ground does exist in the local sphere between the personal and the political. In Hope for Common Ground, Rubio draws on Catholic Social Thought to explore ways to bring Catholics together. Despite their differences, Catholics across the political spectrum can share responsibility for social sin and work within communities to contribute to social progress. Rubio expands this common space into in-depth discussions on family fragility, poverty, abortion, and end-of-life care. These four issues, though divisive, are part of a seamless worldview that holds all human life as sacred. Rubio argues that if those on different sides focus on what can be done to solve social problems in “the space between” or local communities, opposing sides will see they are not so far apart as they think. The common ground thus created can then lead to far-reaching progress on even the most divisive issues—and help quiet the discord tearing apart the Church.
The sacramental and prophetic traditions of Christian spirituality, suggests Matthew Eggemeier, possess critical resources for responding to the contemporary social crises of widespread ecological degradation and the innocent suffering of the crucified poor. In A Sacramental-Prophetic Vision, Eggemeier maintains that the vital key for cultivating these traditions in the present is to situate these spiritualities in the context of spiritual exercises or ascetical practices that enable Christians to live more deeply in the presence of God (coram Deo) and in turn to make this presence visible in a suffering world.
In a world where religion often fuels ethnic and racial conflicts, and where passionate allegiance to rival creeds engenders violent antagonism among members of the same family, dwellers in the same neighborhood, citizens of the same country, no one can doubt the need to rethink the universalist claims of temple, church, and mosque. A feminist analysis of human identity as multifaceted and intrinsically hybrid provides the insights for engaging across different religious visions without erasing distinctiveness. The culmination of the book is a theology modeled on the life, practice, and witness of Jesus of Nazareth that is open to the many patterns of diverse religions as gifts to humankind.

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