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Nominated for the Business Book Awards 'Embracing Change' category ----- If you can't trust those in charge, who can you trust? From government to business, banks to media, trust in institutions is at an all-time low. Widespread corruption, elitism and economic disparity have led to a worldwide upsurge of anti-establishment movements. But this isn't the age of distrust - far from it. In this revolutionary book, world-renowned trust expert Rachel Botsman reveals that we are at the tipping point of one of the biggest social transformations in human history. A new world order is emerging: we have lost faith in brands, leaders and systems, but millions of people every day rent their home to total strangers on AirBnB, exchange cryptocurrency online, or get in the car of an unknown Uber driver. This is the age of distributed trust; a paradigm shift driven by new technologies that are rewriting the rules of an all-too-human relationship. If we are to benefit from this radical transformation, it is vital that we understand the new mechanics of how trust is built, managed, lost and repaired. In Who Can You Trust?, Botsman provides a detailed map of this uncharted landscape - and explores what's next for humanity.
This book demystifies and explains a subject that affects every one of us in our private lives and at work. Security is a practical discipline concerned with safeguarding lives, property, information, wealth, reputations, and social wellbeing. It is the basis of civilised society. People, businesses, and nations cannot thrive in its absence, whereas the right kind of security frees us to live fulfilling lives. But deciding what is needed, and then making it happen, is not easy. The threats to our security are complex and continually evolving, as criminals, hackers, terrorists, and hostile foreign states continually find new ways of staying one step ahead of us, their potential victims. At the same time, we are continually creating new vulnerabilities as we adopt new technologies and new ways of working. Those who do not understand the fundamentals of security, risk, and resilience open themselves, and those around them, to avoidable dangers, needless anxieties, and unnecessary costs. Inadequate security may leave them exposed to intolerable risks, while the wrong kind of security is expensive, intrusive, and ineffective. In his essential new book, world-leading security expert Paul Martin sets out the ten most important guiding principles of protective security and resilience. Clearly expressed in the form of simple but powerful rules of thumb, their purpose is to help solve complicated problems for which there are no textbook solutions. The rules offer a powerful toolkit, designed to work in many different situations, including the cyber domain. When we are faced with novel problems requiring complex decisions, it is easy to focus on the wrong things. These rules remind us what really matters. The psychological and behavioural aspects of security are key themes throughout the book. People lie at the heart of security. The criminals, terrorists, and hackers are social animals with complex emotions and psychological predispositions. So too are the victims of those attackers and the security practitioners who strive to protect us. The human dimension is therefore crucial to understanding security. The Rules of Security will help anyone with an interest in their own security and that of their home, family, business, or society. It will be indispensable to those in positions of responsibility, allowing them to understand how best to protect their organisation, people, and assets. It assumes no expert technical knowledge and explains the ideas in clear and simple terms. It will appeal to anyone with an interest in security. If you read only one book about security, it should be this one.
β€˜One of the best books yet written on data and algorithms. . .deserves a place on the bestseller charts.’ (The Times) You are accused of a crime. Who would you rather determined your fate – a human or an algorithm? An algorithm is more consistent and less prone to error of judgement. Yet a human can look you in the eye before passing sentence. Welcome to the age of the algorithm, the story of a not-too-distant future where machines rule supreme, making important decisions – in healthcare, transport, finance, security, what we watch, where we go even who we send to prison. So how much should we rely on them? What kind of future do we want? Hannah Fry takes us on a tour of the good, the bad and the downright ugly of the algorithms that surround us. In Hello World she lifts the lid on their inner workings, demonstrates their power, exposes their limitations, and examines whether they really are an improvement on the humans they are replacing. A BBC RADIO 4: BOOK OF THE WEEK SHORTLISTED FOR THE 2018 BAILLIE GIFFORD PRIZE AND 2018 ROYAL SOCIETY SCIENCE BOOK PRIZE
Trust has been the subject of empirical and theoretical inquiry in a range of disciplines, including sociology, economics, psychology, philosophy, public policy and political theory. The book approaches trust from a multi-disciplinary scope of inquiry. It explains why most existing definitions and theories of trust are inadequate. The book examines how trust evolved from a quality of personal relationships into a critical factor in political institutions and representation, and to an abstract and impersonal factor that applies now to complex systems, including monetary systems. It makes a distinctive contribution by recasting trust conceptually in dialectical and pragmatic terms, and reapplying the concept to our understanding of critical issues in politics and political economy.
The Committee on Radioactive Waste Management (CoRWM) acts as an independent body to advise and scrutinise the work of the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA), responsible for implementing the Managing Radioactive Waste Safely (MRWS) strategy for the long-term management of radioactive waste: disposal in a deep geological repository, along with a robust interim storage strategy. This report focuses on how CoRWM has performed since 2007 and considers whether its remit has proved appropriate. CoRWM has produced three reports, covering the main strands of the MRWS programme: geological disposal, interim storage, and research and development. The Government has responded positively to many of CoRWM's recommendations. But the Committee is concerned that neither the Government nor CoRWM give the impression of having any sense of urgency. CoRWM could play a more active role in driving forward the MRWS programme through scrutinising, and if necessary reporting on, the Government's progress. The Government should publish clear policy milestones for all aspects of the MRWS programme, include an assessment of their progress against these milestones in an annual report which should also set out the progress the Government has made in meeting the recommendations made by CoRWM in their reports. CoRWM should also provide advice to Government on any draft (as well as established) policies that have implications for the management of radioactive waste. CoRWM's current membership includes an appropriate range of scientific expertise, but it should contain more members with experience of business and practical on-site operations and engineering.

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