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This book is a must-have for country dwellers the world over who already know the astonishing number of ways, apart from baling hay, in which the ubiquitous baler twine can be used.
Before the invention of the combine, the binder was an essential harvesting implement that cut grain and bound the stalks in bundles tied with twine that could then be hand-gathered into shocks for threshing. Hundreds of thousands of farmers across the United States and Canada relied on binders and the twine required for the machine’s operation. Implement manufacturers discovered that the best binder twine was made from henequen and sisal—spiny, fibrous plants native to the Yucatán Peninsula of Mexico. The double dependency that subsequently developed between Mexico and the Great Plains of the United States and Canada affected the agriculture, ecology, and economy of all three nations in ways that have historically been little understood. These interlocking dependencies—identified by author Sterling Evans as the “henequen-wheat complex”—initiated or furthered major ecological, social, and political changes in each of these agricultural regions. Drawing on extensive archival work as well as the existing secondary literature, Evans has woven an intricate story that will change our understanding of the complex, transnational history of the North American continent.
Bast and Other Plant Fibres, a title in Woodhead Publishing’s series on fibres published in association with The Textile Institute, UK, is the first book in over 50 years to cover the most interesting plant fibres and those with high annual production. Bast fibres have many textile applications, with natural fibre composites being the fastest growing due to the combination of their relatively low cost and excellent technical characteristics. Following the editor’s introductory chapter, which includes a comprehensive set of tables comparing the physical and chemical characteristics of the fibres, Chapter 2 discusses jute while Chapters 3 and 4 cover flax and hemp. Subsequent chapters are devoted to ramie, sisal, coir and abaca. Chapter 9 brings together information on minor fibres that may deserve greater interest on the part of international markets, while Chapter 10 is dedicated to the use of bast and leaf fibres in composites. Information is included on production and processing, physical and chemical properties, and on economic, environmental, and health and safety considerations. This book is an essential reference to academics and researchers in agriculture and horticulture as well as those working in textiles, apparel and industrial design, and textile testing and forensic science laboratories. It will also be invaluable to those working in government departments such as agriculture or trade and industry. Essential discussion on chemical and physical properties of individual natural fibres Looks at environmental advantages of bast fibres over synthetic fibres First book of its kind in over 50 years

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