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A man traveling across a field encountered a tiger. He fled, the tiger after him. Coming to a precipice, he caught hold of the root of a wild vine and swung himself down over the edge. The tiger sniffed at him from above. Trembling, the man looked down to where, far below, another tiger was waiting to eat him. Only the vine sustained him. Two mice, one white and one black, little by little started to gnaw away the vine. The man saw a luscious strawberry near him. Grasping the vine with one hand, he plucked the strawberry with the other. How sweet it tasted! 101 Zen Koans for Daily Zen What is a koan? A kōan is a story, dialogue, question, or statement which is used in Zen practice to provoke the "great doubt" and test a student's progress in Zen practice. Wriitten late in the thirteenth century by the Japanese Zen teacher Muju, and from anecdotes of Zen monks taken from various books published in Japan around the turn of the 20th century TIP: Take time to ponder and read at a leisurely pace
a golden firefly at one with the universe dancing with the stars This book is a collection of 101 beautiful Japanese koans and stories capturing the essence of Zen philosophy. A kōan is a story, dialogue, question, or statement, which is used in Zen practice to provoke the "great doubt" and test a student's progress in Zen practice. A must-have for lovers of beautiful storytelling, Japanese culture, and Zen thinking. Enjoy!
There was an old woman in China who had supported a monk for over twenty years. She had built a little hut for him and fed him while he was meditating. Finally she wondered just what progress he had made in all this time. To find out, she obtained the help of a girl rich in desire. “Go and embrace him,” she told her, “and then ask him suddenly: ‘What now?’” The girl called upon the monk and without much ado caressed him, asking him what he was going to do about it. “An old tree grows on a cold rock in winter,” replied the monk somewhat poetically. “Nowhere is there any warmth.” The girl returned and related what he had said. “To think I fed that fellow for twenty years!” exclaimed the old woman in anger. “He showed no consideration for your need, no disposition to explain your condition. He need not have responded to passion, but at least he could have evidenced some compassion.” She at once went to the hut of the monk and burned it down. This Zen classic includes the following stories: 1. A Cup of Tea 2. Finding a Diamond on a Muddy Road 3. Is That So? 4. Obedience 5. If You Love, Love Openly 6. No Loving-Kindness 7. Annoucement 8. Great Waves 9. The Moon Cannot Be Stolen 10. The Last Poem of Hoshin 11. The Story of Shunkai 12. Happy Chinaman 13. A Buddha 14. Muddy Road 15. Shoan and His Mother 16. Not Far From Buddhahood 17. Stingy in Teaching 18. A Parable 19. The First Principle 20. A Mother’s Advice 21. The Sound of One Hand 22. My Heart Burns Like Fire 23. Eshun’s Departure 24. Reciting Sutras 25. Three Days More 26. Trading Dialogue For Lodging 27. The Voice of Happiness 28. Open Your Own Treasure House 29. No Water, No Moon 30. Calling Card 31. Everything is Best 32. Inch Time Foot Gem 33. Mokusen’s Hand 34. A Smile in His Lifetime 35. Every-Minute Zen 36. Flower Shower 37. Publishing the Sutras 38. Gisho’s Work 39. Sleeping in the Daytime 40. In Dreamland 41. Joshu’s Zen 42. The Dead Man’s Answer 43. Zen in a Beggar’s Life 44. The Thief Who Became a Disciple 45. Right and Wrong 46. How Grass and Trees Become Enlightened 47. The Stingy Artist 48. Accurate Proportion 49. Black-Nosed Buddha 50. Ryonen’s Clear Realization 51. Sour Miso 52. Your Light May Go Out 53. The Giver Should Be Thankful 54. The Last Will and Testament 55. The Tea-Master and The Assassin 56. The True Path 57. The Gates of Paradise 58. Arresting the Stone Buddha 59. Soldiers of Humanity 60. The Tunnel 61. Gudo and the Emperor 62. In the Hands of Destiny 63. Killing 64. Kasan Sweat 65. The Subjugation of a Ghost 66. Children of His Majesty 67. What Are You Doing! What Are You Saying! 68. One Note of Zen 69. Eating the Blame 70. The Most Valuable Thing in the World 71. Learning to Be Silent 72. The Blockhead Lord 73. Ten Successors 74. True Reformation 75. Temper 76. The Stone Mind 77. No Attachment to Dust 78. Real Prosperity 79. Incense Burner 80. The Real Miracle 81. Just Go to Sleep 82. Nothing Exists 83. No Work, No Food 84. True Friends 85. Time to Die 86. The Living Buddha and the Tubmaker 87. Three Kinds of Disciples 88. How to Write a Chinese Poem 89. Zen Dialogue 90. The Last Rap 91. The Taste of Banzo’s Sword 92. Fire-Poker Zen 93. Storyteller’s Zen 94. Midnight Excursion 95. A Letter to a Dying Man 96. A Drop of Water 97. Teaching the Ultimate 98. Non-Attachment 99. Tosui’s Vinegar 100. The Silent Temple 101. Buddha’s Zen
Discover how the mysterious, powerful form of the koan—known for bringing about sudden enlightenment—can disrupt and illuminate your everyday understanding of life. Traditionally, Zen koans—the teaching stories of Zen—are drawn from the words and teachings of ancient masters and primarily address the concerns of (male) monastic practitioners. In The Crow Flies Backward, Ross Bolleter changes all at. The 108 modern koans offered within address sexuality and childbirth, family, parenthood, work, money and even the nature time itself. These koans are drawn from a variety of modern sources: Western philosophy, the Bible, contemporary and classic literature from Proust to Lewis Carroll and Mary Oliver and Anne Carson, as well as stories provided by author’s encounters with his Zen students. Bolleter’s commentaries provide guidance to the reader on how to engage with each koan and koans in general, and direct guidance to meditate with koans. An appendix offers rarely-seen intimate and in-depth accounts of the process of koan introspection, from four of the author’s senior students.
A collection of writings about Asian philosophy and Zen Buddhism.
In a world of spiritual options, people constantly tell us what to believe. Yet, while we hear these pleas, we're already functioning with existing beliefs—even if they are beliefs by default. So how do we choose what to believe—especially in the area of faith? Do we need to choose? In Choosing Your Faith, Mark Mittelberg encourages us, as Socrates does, not to lead an unexamined life. He invites us to examine why we believe what we believe. This examination will resonate with Christians and seekers alike.
This book of koans contains some of the most important Zen sayings of all time along with insightful commentary. Koans are the intellectually unsolvable problem-riddles at the core of the Rinzai tradition of Zen Buddhism, perhaps the most well-known one being "what is the sound of one hand clapping." Though widely recognized, most koan remain narrowly understood. In this new edition of The Iron Flute, one hundred of the most challenging and enlightening koan from the Chinese Chan (Zen) patriarchs of the Tang and Sung dynasties are presented, along with commentary from the great Zen masters Genro, Fugai, and Nyogen, and an in-depth biography of author Nyogen Senzaki (1876-1958), a pioneer in bringing Zen Buddhism to the West. The Iron Flute stands alone as the definitive work on koan-an essential pathway to the tenets and practice of Zen Buddhism.
When Zen Flesh, Zen Bones was published in 1957 it became an instant sensation with an entire generation of readers who were just beginning to experiment with Zen. Over the years it has inspired leading American Zen teachers, students, and practitioners. Its popularity is as strong today as ever. Zen Flesh, Zen Bones is a book that offers a collection of accessible, primary Zen sources so that readers can struggle over the meaning of Zen for themselves. It includes 101 Zen Stories, a collection of tales that recount actual experiences of Chinese and Japanese Zen teachers over a period of more than five centuries; The Gateless Gate, the famous thirteenth century collection of Zen koans; Ten Bulls, a twelfth century commentary on the stages of awareness leading to enlightenment; and Centering, a 4,000 year-old teaching from India that some consider to be the roots of Zen.—Print Ed.
When Zen Flesh, Zen Bones was published in 1957 it became an instant sensation with an entire generation of readers who were just beginning to experiment with Zen. Over the years it has inspired leading American Zen teachers, students, and practitioners. Its popularity is as high today as ever. Zen Flesh, Zen Bones is a book that offers a collection of accessible, primary Zen sources so that readers can struggle over the meaning of Zen for themselves. It includes 101 Zen Stories, a collection of tales that recount actual experiences of Chinese and Japanese Zen teachers over a period of more than five centuries; The Gateless Gate, the famous thirteenth-century collection of Zen koans; Ten Bulls, a twelfth century commentary on the stages of awareness leading to enlightenment; and Centering, a 4,000 year-old teaching from India that some consider to be the roots of Zen.
“Henri Nouwen was one of the great spiritual masters of the modern age. His beloved writings have helped millions understand that no matter where we are, God can meet us there. Read this brand-new compilation of his writings and conferences, and let Henri Nouwen accompany you—with his trademark wisdom, acuity, common sense, erudition and, most of all, compassion—and help you encounter God more fully in your daily life.” — James Martin, SJ, author of The Jesuit Guide to (Almost) Everything Led by the writing of beloved, bestselling author Henri Nouwen (With Open Hands, Reaching Out, The Wounded Healer, Making All Things New), the authors of Spiritual Direction, return with the second work in this popular spirituality series on how to live out the five classical stages of spiritual development.
Written with the practitioner in mind, this concise, useful overview of the theory and practice of Alfred Adler's Individual Psychology explains the dimensions and uses of natural and logical consequences - the bases of Adlerian/Individual Psychology. Now entering its fourth edition, Adlerian Counseling has withstood the test of time thanks to its practical approach and its coverage of a variety of settings (school, home, community, business) and populations (children, adolescents, adults).
A journey through the diverse landscape of American Buddhism, written with “a blessedly down-to-earth sense of humor” (Rodger Kamenetz, author of The Jew in the Lotus). In an era when many of us yearn for an escape from a culture of noise and narcissism, this book takes us into the physical and spiritual geography of Buddhism, American-style: from a weekend at a mountain retreat for corporate executives learning effective ways to cope with stress, to a visit with a Zen teacher holding classes in an old Quaker farmhouse, to a meeting with a Catholic priest who’s also a Zen master. Both a lively introduction to this Eastern spiritual tradition and a colorful portrait of American society, The Accidental Buddhist “makes the oftentimes impenetrable concepts of Buddhism accessible to the reader and contains striking, and important, parallels and contrasts between [the author’s] own Catholic upbringing and ancient Buddhist traditions” (Library Journal). “A travelogue detailing the tremendous diversity within American Buddhism. His anecdotes make it clear that the umbrella term ‘Buddhist’ encompasses strict Zen monks, laid-back Tibetan politicos, and beatnik holdover Allen Ginsberg. In his travels, Moore attends weekend retreats, chronicles the Dalai Lama’s 1996 visit to Indiana, and grooves to Change Your Mind Day, a meditative Buddha-fest in New York City’s Central Park. . . . He finds that his family is his sangha (monastery), and while he still feels he is ‘probably a fairly lousy Buddhist,’ he will eclectically combine his various forms of new knowledge to find a path that makes sense to him. Now that may be an authentic American Buddhism.” —Kirkus Reviews
Nishida Kitarô, Japan's premier modern philosopher, was born in 1870 and grew to intellectual maturity in the final decades of the Meiji period (1868-1912). He achieved recognition as Japan's leading establishment philosopher during his tenure as professor of philosophy at Kyoto University. After his retirement in 1927, and until his death in 1945, Nishida published a continuous stream of original essays that can best be described as intercivilizational, a meeting point of East and West. His final essay, The Logic of the Place of Nothingness and the Religious Worldview, completed in the last few months before his death, is a summation of his philosophy of religion and has come to be regarded as the foundational text of the Kyoto school. It is one of the few places in his writings where Nishida draws openly and freely on East Asian Buddhist sources as analogs of his own ideas. Here Nishida argues for the existential primordiality of the religious consciousness against Kant, while also critically engaging the thought of such authors as Aristotle, the Christian Neo-Platonists, Spinoza, Fichte, Hegel, Barth, and Tillich. He makes it clear that he is also indebted to Pascal, Kierkegaard, and Dostoievsky as well as to Nâgârjuna, the Ch'an masters, Shinran, Dôgen, and other Buddhist thinkers. This book--a translation of the most seminal work of Nishida's career--also includes a translation of his Last Writing (Zeppitsu), written just two days before his death.
Critical essays discuss the language, symbolism, and psychological structure of the classic novel of Holden Caulfield's search for identity.

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