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Learn the fast and simple way to whittle in this fun introduction to woodcarving. Discover how to whittle in less time while you have more fun! One of the joys of whittling with a pocket knife is that you can do it just about anywhere. You don’t need any fancy equipment... and you don’t even need much spare time. Author Tom Hindes demonstrates his easy-to-learn, quick-cut method for whittling expressive little figures from wood in just 20 minutes or less. With his friendly instructions and step-by-step photos, you’ll learn to carve an endless array of charming wizards, gnomes, gargoyles, ornaments, dogs, leprechauns, and more. These super-short projects are perfect for learning basic caricature carving skills. They also make wonderful little gifts for random acts of kindness. Leave one along with your tip at the local restaurant, or give one to your favorite cashier. Children especially enjoy receiving them as souvenirs.
In continuation of the bestselling 20-Minute Whittling Projects, Tom Hindes brings you 24 more fast, easy, and fun whittling projects to complete in one sitting! With step-by-step instructions and a focus on the beginner-friendly flat plane style of whittling, you'll carve owls, wizards, gnomes, and even a pair of boots. Progressing from very simple to more challenging, each project is meant to encourage you along the rewarding and relaxing path of whittling and build your skills.
You can whittle just about anything—the only limit is your imagination. It’s so easy to get started in this relaxing and rewarding hobby. All you need is a knife, a twig, and this book! We’ve assembled a team of 12 leading woodcarvers to bring you a complete starter guide to whittling. They present 24 easy whittling projects that you can make in just a weekend, complete with step-by-step instructions, how-to photographs, ready-to-carve patterns, and helpful tips. Start off with fast and fun projects that build confidence and teach fundamental carving techniques, like a simple flying propeller or a 5-minute owl. Then move on to create whittled wonders like a musical frog or a slingshot. We show you how to whittle complex designs in easy steps, so that you’ll soon be carving attention-getting favorites like chain links or the classic ball-in-a-cage.
Whittling is the cheapest and easiest hobby you can imagine: with just a sharp knife, a little practice and the tiniest block of wood, you can make a characterful carving in less than an hour. It's relaxing, too, and the charming and quirky results offer a cute payoff in return for a very slight investment of either time or money. A warning, though: this simple hobby can prove addictive. Tiny Whittling is a modern guide to this very ancient craft. Steve Tomashek, whose masterly little figures have won a slew of awards in the US, guides the reader through the basics, showing you the first simple cuts (on root vegetables, to minimize the danger of accidents) to create first a turnip bear, then a carrot mouse. Confidence built, you can graduate to wood, and work through photographic steps, practising each technique with specific projects, and enjoying the increasingly polished results. You'll learn how to sand, paint and decorate your carvings and the final chapters teach you how to make jointed figures and how to undertake minute groups, from a Noah's Ark to a forest scene.
The idea that technology will pave the road to prosperity has been promoted throughboth boom and bust. Today we are told that universal broadband access, high-tech jobs, andcutting-edge science will pull us out of our current economic downturn and move us toward social andeconomic equality. In Digital Dead End, Virginia Eubanks argues that to believethis is to engage in a kind of magical thinking: a technological utopia will come about simplybecause we want it to. This vision of the miraculous power of high-tech development is driven byflawed assumptions about race, class, and gender. The realities of the information age are morecomplicated, particularly for poor and working-class women and families. For them, informationtechnology can be both a tool of liberation and a means of oppression. But despitethe inequities of the high-tech global economy, optimism and innovation flourished when Eubanksworked with a community of resourceful women living at her local YWCA. Eubanks describes a newapproach to creating a broadly inclusive and empowering "technology for people,"popular technology, which entails shifting the focus from teaching technicalskill to nurturing critical technological citizenship, building resources for learning, andfostering social movement.
Popular Science gives our readers the information and tools to improve their technology and their world. The core belief that Popular Science and our readers share: The future is going to be better, and science and technology are the driving forces that will help make it better.

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