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This fourth and final volume in the wonderfully concise Brief HIstory of Britain series begins with Queen Victoria opening the Great Exhibition in Hyde Park. This was high-water mark of British achievement - the nation at the forefront of the Industrial Revolution, at the heart of a burgeoning Empire, with a queen who would reign for another fifty years. During the ensuing 150 years, Britain has faced turmoil and transformation. But it is too simple to talk of decline. In the concluding volume of this landmark four-volume series, Jeremy Black explores issues such as whether Great Britain has sacrificed its identity in order to stay part of the present world order. This is an insightful examination of how present-day Britain was formed.
From the Great Exhibition to the Credit Crunch - the transformation of Britain from the world's greatest nation to the present day In 1851 Queen Victoria opened the Great Exhibition in Hyde Park, it was the high water mark of English achievement - the nation at the forefront of the Industrial Revolution, at the heart of a burgeoning Empire, with a queen who would reign for another 50 years. In the following 150 years, the fate of the nation has faced turmoil and transformation. But it is too simple to talk of decline? Has Great Britain sacrificed its identity in order to stay part of the present world order. Leading historian, Jeremy Black, completes the landmark four volume Brief History of Britain series with a brilliant, insightful examination of how present day Britain was formed.
From the Battle of Hastings to the Battle of Bosworth Field, Nicholas Vincent tells the story of how Britain was born. When William, Duke of Normandy, killed King Harold and seized the throne of England, England's language, culture, politics and law were transformed. Over the next four hundred years, under royal dynasties that looked principally to France for inspiration and ideas, an English identity was born, based in part upon struggle for control over the other parts of the British Isles (Scotland, Wales and Ireland), in part upon rivalry with the kings of France. From these struggles emerged English law and an English Parliament, the English language, English humour and England's first overseas empires. In this thrilling and accessible account, Nicholas Vincent not only tells the story of the rise and fall of dynasties, but investigates the lives and obsessions of a host of lesser men and women, from archbishops to peasants, and from soldiers to scholars, upon whose enterprise the social and intellectual foundations of Englishness now rest. This the first book in the four volume Brief History of Britain which brings together some of the leading historians to tell our nation's story from the Norman Conquest of 1066 to the present-day. Combining the latest research with accessible and entertaining story telling, it is the ideal introduction for students and general readers.
This is a comprehensive history of Portugal that covers the whole span, from the Stone Age to today. An introduction provides an understanding of geographical and climatic issues, before an examination of Portugal's prehistory and classical Portugal, from the Stone Age to the end of the the Roman era. Portugal's history from ad420 to the thirteenth century takes in the Suevi, Visigoths and Moors. Then, a look at medieval Portugal, covers the development of Christian Portugal culminating with the expulsion of the Moors, with a focus on key sites. A subsequent section on Spanish rule, between 1580 and 1640, explains why Spain took over and why Spanish rule collapsed. There is a significant focus on Portugal's global role, particularly during the age of exploration, or expansion, in the fifteenth century to 1580: Manueline Portugal, Henry the Navigator, Vasco da Gama and Belém. Portugal was the first of the Atlantic empires, with territory in the Azores, Madeira, West Africa and Brazil, and it remained a major empire until the 1820s, retaining an African empire until the 1970s. It's empire in Asia - in Malacca, Macao, Goa and Timor - continued even longer, until the 1990s. Black shows how Portugal had a global impact, but the world, too, had an impact on Portugal. Baroque Portugal, between 1640 and 1800, is explored through palaces in Mafra, Pombal and elsewhere and the wealth of Brazil. The nineteenth century brought turmoil in the form of a French invasion, the Peninsular War, Brazilian independence, successive revolutions, economic issues and the end of the monarchy. Republican Portugal brought further chaos in the early years of the twentieth century, then the dictatorship of Salazar and its end in the Carnation Revolution of 1974. Portugal's role in both world wars is examined, also its wars in Africa. From the overthrow of autocracy to a new constitution and the leadership of Soares, contemporary, democratic Portugal is explored, including the fiscal crisis of recent years. Throughout Black introduces the history and character of the country's principal regions, including the Azores, Madeira and the Cape Verde Islands. He looks at key national sites, at Portuguese food and wine and the arts, with special sections devoted to port, Portugal's famous tiles and the university established at Coimbra in 1290.
Despite being relatively brief, this very readable history covers environmental, political, social, economic, cultural and artistic elements, and is very open to regional variations and to the extent that the history of the peninsula and of its political groupings was far from inevitable. Its tone is accessible, supported by boxes providing supplemental information, and is perfect for travellers to Spain.
Praise for the author: 'Gibson's well written and well-documented account of James and the bishops will surely become the new standard authority on these "implausible revolutionaries" for many decades.' Barbara Brandon Schnorrenberg, Anglican and Episcopal History In 1660, England emerged from the devastation of the Civil Wars and restored the king, Charles II, to the throne. Over the next 190 years Britain would establish itself as the leading nation in the world - the centre of a burgeoning empire, at the forefront of the Enlightenment and the driving force behind the Industrial Revolution. However, radical change also brought with it anxiety and violence. America was lost in the War of Independence and calls for revolution at home were never far from the surface of everyday life. In this vivid and convincing overview of the era in which Britain transformed the world and was itself remade, leading historian of the period William Gibson also looks at the impact of this revolutionary change on the ordinary citizens of Britain. This is the third book in this wonderfully concise four-volume Brief History of Britain which brings together leading historians to tell the story of Britain from the Norman Conquest of 1066 right up to the present day. Combining the latest research with accessible and entertaining story-telling, it is the ideal introduction to British history for students and general readers.
The Oxford History of Britain tells the story of Britain and its people over two thousand years, from the coming of the Roman legions to the present day. Encompassing political, social, economic, and cultural developments throughout the British Isles, the dramatic narrative is taken up in turn by ten leading historians who offer the fruits of the best modern scholarship to the general reader in an authoritative form. A vivid, sometimes surprising picture emerges of a continuous turmoil of change in every period, and the wider social context of political and economic tension is made clear. But consensus, no less than conflict, is a part of the story: in focusing on elements of continuity down the centuries, the authors bring out that special awareness of identity which has been such a distinctive feature of British society. By relating both these factors in the British experience, and by exploring the many ways in which Britain has shaped and been shaped by contact with Europe and the wider world, this landmark work brings the reader face to face with the past, and the foundations of modern British society. The new edition brings the story into the twenty-first century, covering the changes to British society and culture during the Blair years and the invasion of Iraq and its aftermath.
Exam Board: SQA Level: Higher Subject: History First Teaching: September 2014 First Exam: June 2015 Enables students to develop the skills required to succesfully tackle both the essay-based and source-based questions. This title has been written specifically to cover the Paper 1 content of the revised Higher History course. It provides comprehensive coverage of the essay-based topics Britain & Scotland 1851-1951 and Germany 1815-1939. The sections on Britain include the growth of democratic institutions in Britain, from the extension of the franchise, votes for women and the social welfare reforms of the early twentieth century to the birth of the welfare state. The German sections of the book trace the growth of German Nationalism, the difficulties in creating a united Germany and unification, and go on to consider the rise of the Nazis and the Nazis in power. - A full-colour, topic-based approach to the revised Higher History syllabus - Covers all of the main issues within each topic area - Includes investigative techniques, use of evidence and a variety of activities
This is a detailed, single volume analysis of Britain's changing position in the world during the twentieth century. It places British policy making in the appropriate domestic and international contexts, offers an alternative to the more negative, 'decline'-obsessed assessments of Britain's role and influence in global affairs. This book suggests that Britain's leaders did a better job than some historians think. Michael Turner, in order to understand why they took the options they did, investigates their motives and aims within the international environment within which they operated.
How 'true' is climate change, and how do we know? Who is to blame for the financial crisis? What is the truth about the drone wars? We live in an age of crises that are global in scale and potentially apocalyptic in severity. In response, the language of war has been increasingly deployed across a whole spectrum of ecological, social and economic problems: war on terror; war on warming; war on want; war on bankers' bonuses; war on drugs; war on waste; war on genocidal leaders. Peter Lee examines climate change, military intervention and financial collapse to reveal how truth is used by competing interests to shape individual behaviour, attitudes and identity.
In her extensively researched exploration of China in British children’s literature, Shih-Wen Chen provides a sustained critique of the reductive dichotomies that have limited insight into the cultural and educative role these fictions played in disseminating ideas and knowledge about China. Chen considers a range of different genres and types of publication-travelogue storybooks, historical novels, adventure stories, and periodicals-to demonstrate the diversity of images of China in the Victorian and Edwardian imagination. Turning a critical eye on popular and prolific writers such as Anne Bowman, William Dalton, Edwin Harcourt Burrage, Bessie Marchant, G.A. Henty, and Charles Gilson, Chen shows how Sino-British relations were influential in the representation of China in children’s literature, challenges the notion that nineteenth-century children’s literature simply parroted the dominant ideologies of the age, and offers insights into how attitudes towards children’s relationship with knowledge changed over the course of the century. Her book provides a fresh context for understanding how China was constructed in the period from 1851 to 1911 and sheds light on British cultural history and the history and uses of children’s literature.
The army in India was the principal pillar of British power in South Asia from the mid-nineteenth century until Indian independence. This volume aims to evaluate the combat effectiveness of the army in British India from the mutiny of 1857 until the British departed India in 1947. It examines how the army in India developed from a colonial police force into one of the world's largest volunteer armies which saw service around the globe. The author presents new primary material from international archival sources and develops original interpretations of the political and military role of the army in colonial India. These new arguments include: the army's conduct of 'small wars' on the North-West frontier aided it in conducting tactical warfare in Burma during World War II; small unit raids developed in India were put to good effect beyond India's borders; the army's practical experience of counter-insurgency was used in Greece and Indonesia after 1945; and, contrary to existing scholarship, the British did not follow a deliberate policy of 'Indianization' of the officer corps .
The IBR, published again since 1971 as an interdisciplinary, international bibliography of reviews, offers book reviews of literature dealing primarily with the humanities and social sciences published in 6,000 mainly European scholarly journals. This unique bibliography contains over 1.3 millions book reviews. 60,000 entries are added every year with details on the work reviewed and the review.
There have been many books on Britain's Roman roads, but none have considered in any depth their long-term strategic impact. Mike Bishop shows how the road network was vital not only in the Roman strategy of conquest and occupation, but influenced the course of British military history during subsequent ages. The author starts with the pre-Roman origins of the network (many Roman roads being built over prehistoric routes) before describing how the Roman army built, developed, maintained and used it. Then, uniquely, he moves on to the post-Roman history of the roads. He shows how they were crucial to medieval military history (try to find a medieval battle that is not near one) and the governance of the realm, fixing the itinerary of the royal progresses. Their legacy is still clear in the building of 18th century military roads and even in the development of the modern road network. Why have some parts of the network remained in use throughout?The text is supported with clear maps and photographs. Most books on Roman roads are concerned with cataloguing or tracing them, or just dealing with aspects like surveying. This one makes them part of military landscape archaeology.
The Christians is the history of Christianity, told chronologically, epoch by epoch, century by century, beginning at Pentecost and concluding with Christians as we find ourselves in the twenty-first century. It will consist of approximately twelve volumes, produced over a 10-year period at the beginning of the third Christian millennium. It is written and edited by Christians for Christians of all denominations. Its purpose is to tell the story of the Christian family, so that we may be knowledgeable of our origins, may well know and wisely profit from the experiences of our past both good and bad, and may find strength and inspiration to face the challenges of our era from the magnificent examples set for us by those who went before. - Back cover.
The Journal of the Civil War Era Volume 2, Number 2 June 2012 TABLE OF CONTENTS New Approaches to Internationalizing the History of the Civil War Era: A Special Issue Editor's Note William Blair Articles W. Caleb Mcdaniel & Bethany L. Johnson New Approaches to Internationalizing the History of the Civil War: An Introduction Gale L. Kenny Manliness and Manifest Racial Destiny: Jamaica and African American Emigration in the 1850s Edward B. Rugemer Slave Rebels and Abolitionists: The Black Atlantic and the Coming of the Civil War Peter Kolchin Comparative Perspectives on Emancipation in the U.S. South: Reconstruction, Radicalism, and Russia Susan-Mary Grant The Lost Boys: Citizen-Soldiers, Disabled Veterans, and Confederate Nationalism in the Age of People's War Book Reviews Books Received Professional Notes Mark W. Geiger "Follow the Money" Notes on Contributors The Journal of the Civil War Era takes advantage of the flowering of research on the many issues raised by the sectional crisis, war, Reconstruction, and memory of the conflict, while bringing fresh understanding to the struggles that defined the period, and by extension, the course of American history in the nineteenth century.
Taking a largely chronological approach, A Brief History of Australia looks at social, cultural, economic, and political trends in the country's long history, all of which have contributed to its unique and complex identity. Beginning with the peopling of the continent about 60,000 years ago, the volume examines the early history and culture of the Aboriginals, Australia's indigenous population and the oldest continuously surviving culture in the world. The volume continues with the first documented sighting of the landmass by a European in the 17th century and the colonial period in the 18th and 19th centuries. From the Federation of 1901 to the Liberal government of John Howard (1998-2007) and the Labor government of Kevin Rudd (2007-present), this new book explores Australia's relationship to the British Crown, environmental issues that plague the land, the rights of marginalized people, and the role of sports. Basic facts, a chronology, a bibliography, and a list of suggested reading make up the appendixes.
The Irish Times is a pillar of Irish society. Founded in 1859 as the paper of the Irish Protestant Middle Class, it now has a position in Irish political, social and cultural life which is incomparable. In fact this history of the Irish Times is also a history of the Irish people. Always independent in ownership and political view and never entwined in any way with the Roman Catholic Church, it has become the weather vane, the barometer of Irish life and society followed by people of all religious and political persuasions and none. The paper is politically liberal and progressive as well as being centre right on economic issues. This history is peopled by all the great figures of Irish history - Daniel O`Connell, W.B. Yeats, Garret FitzGerald, Conor Cruise O`Brien and the paper has numbered among its internationally renowned columnists Mary Holland, Fintan O'Toole, Nuala O'Faolain, John Waters and Kevin Myers . Its influence on Irish Society is beyond question. In his book, Terence Brown tells the story of the paper with narrative skill, wit and perception. Analysis of the stance of the Times during events ranging from The Easter Rising, The Civil War, the Troubles and the recent economic recession make the book essential reading for students of Irish history, be they the general reader, the academic or amateur historian. The book will be seen as crucial to our understanding of Irish history in the past century and a half.
Praise for the first edition: 'Royle calls on an impressive range of materials (supported by an excellent bibliography) to offer a judicious review of most of the issues currently confronted by social historians. His agenda contains both traditional and novel elements [...] all are presented with admirable clarity and balance. [...] A volume which shows an astonishing command of such a wide range of material will long prove essential reading.' Times Literary Supplement This popular work provides an in-depth historical background to issues of contemporary concern, tracing developments over the past two and a half centuries. It promotes accessibility by adopting a thematic approach, with each theme treated chronologically. Major themes are chosen partly by their importance to an understanding of the past and partly by their relevance to students of contemporary Britain - rather than by imposing current fashions in historical study on the past. Thoroughly revised, the third edition of Modern Britain reviews and brings up to date the content to take account of developments since 1997 and reconsiders emphases and interpretations in light of more recent scholarship. It incorporates new currents in historical writing on matters such as the language of class, the position of women, and the revolution worked by the Internet and mobile technologies. Modern Britain is vital reading for students of history and the social and political sciences.

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