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"The Huang Di nei jing su wen is composed of a total of 1866 different Chinese characters. The present ... [dictionary] covers all of them, as well as what were identified as meaningful compounds." -- p. 2.
"These 2 volumes will be sold as a boxed set under a single ISBN. No further volumes are forthcoming."--Comments, ECIP data view.
This is the story of a Chinese doctor, his book, and the creatures that danced within its pages. The Monkey and the Inkpot introduces natural history in sixteenth-century China through the iconic Bencao gangmu (Systematic materia medica) of Li Shizhen (1518 - 1593). In the first book-length study in English of Li's text, Carla Nappi reveals a "cabinet of curiosities" of gems, beasts, and oddities whose author was devoted to using natural history to guide the application of natural and artificial objects as medical drugs.
The Ben cao gang mu, compiled in the second half of the sixteenth century by a team led by the physician Li Shizhen (1518–1593) on the basis of previously published books and contemporary knowledge, is the largest encyclopedia of natural history in a long tradition of Chinese materia medica works. Its description of almost 1,900 pharmaceutically used natural and man-made substances marks the apex of the development of premodern Chinese pharmaceutical knowledge. The Ben cao gang mu dictionary offers access to this impressive work of 1,600,000 characters. This third book in a three-volume series offers detailed biographical data on all identifiable authors, patients, witnesses of therapies, transmitters of recipes, and further persons mentioned in the Ben cao gang mu and provides bibliographical data on all textual sources resorted to and quoted by Li Shizhen and his collaborators.
In this selection of core texts, Richard Bertschinger presents a commentary and translation of the key writings for students and practitioners of Chinese medicine in the 21st century from the ancient, definitive set of books on Chinese medicine, the Huangdi Neijing or 'the Yellow Emperor's Medical Classic'. Bertschinger selects the key sections of the long and often impenetrable Huangdi Neijing that are vital for students and practitioners to know and understand for practice today, and provides an accessible view of these fundamental writings which remain central to all traditional approaches to medicine in China. Taking eminent Ming doctor and scholar Li Zhongzi's selection of texts as a basis, he also includes a number of additional texts from the Huangdi Neijing on topics such as the spirit in treatment, a resonance with nature, the art of needling, and the Five Elemental body and personality types, thus ensuring the relevance of this core set of information for students and practitioners of acupuncture and traditional Chinese medicine today.
THE PSYCHE IN CHINESE MEDICINE comprehensively discusses the treatment of mental-emotional disorders with both acupuncture and herbal medicine. Suitable for practitioners and students of Chinese medicine it discusses first the aetiology, pathology and diagnosis of mental disorders. It explores the nature of the Mind (Shen), Ethereal Soul (Hun), Corporeal Soul (Po), Intellect (Yi) and Will-Power (Zhi) and then presents the diagnosis and treatment of the most common psychological disorders with both acupuncture and Chinese herbs in detail. Specific chapters focus on the treatment of common conditions including depression, anxiety, insomnia, panic attacks, bipolar disorder and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Each condition is illustrated with case histories from the author’s 35 years-long practice. Comprehensive discussion of the nature of the Shen, Hun, Po, Yi and Zhi in Chinese medicine The first detailed description of the nature and functions of the Hun (Ethereal Soul) and how that relates to conditions such as depression, bipolar disorders and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder An entire chapter dedicated to the functions of acupuncture points in the treatment of mental-emotional disorders Case studies that offer realistic insights and understanding to the range of diagnostic and treatment choices the practitioner can make Attractive 2-colour page layout gives easy access and navigation around the text
This new edition of The Treatment of Pain with Chinese Herbs and Acupuncture gives a thorough and analytical review of the diagnosis and treatment options for pain, using acupuncture with Chinese herbal medicine. Based on the clinical experience of the author and supported by that of acupuncturists in Chinese universities, it offers a comprehensive and detailed set of treatments for a wide variety of pain symptoms and conditions, and includes detailed modifications of the treatments, to aid clinical practice. Although pain syndromes are often complicated, involving both psychological and physical difficulties, resulting in sometimes hesitation in deciding a correct treatment, there are still some short-cut ways to achieve a successful result. Therefore, the essential intentions of the authors are very clear: To demonstrate the practitioners how to differentiate the clinical situations and how to establish the corresponding treatments. To illustrate how to apply Chinese herbs logically and how to consist an acupuncture prescription reasonably and effectively. Features - Thorough exploration of the aetiologies and pathologies for pain in the context of Traditional Chinese Medicine - Clear discussion of the principles of treatment, acupuncture point selection and combination - Detailed explanation of herbal and acupuncture treatments for common and complex pain conditions - Deals comprehensively with the commonest clinical presenting symptoms - Provides treatment plans and modifications to these plans, offering more options for the practitioner - Includes detailed and useful case histories New to this edition: New chapter on treatment of pain in children Separate sections for the gynecologic conditions Includes Western-named conditions Red Flags for practitioners to indicate situations which are potentially life-threatening or dangerous Suggested treatments now include acupuncture as well as herbal treatments Following on from each treatment a prognosis is now provided
Christopher Hamlin’s magisterial work engages a common experience—fever—in all its varieties and meanings. Reviewing the representations of that condition from ancient times to the present, More Than Hot is a history of the world through the lens of fever. The book deals with the expression of fever, with the efforts of medical scientists to classify it, and with fever’s changing social, cultural, and political significance. Long before there were thermometers to measure it, people recognized fever as a dangerous, if transitory, state of being. It was the most familiar form of alienation from the normal self, a concern to communities and states as well as to patients, families, and healers. The earliest medical writers struggled for a conceptual vocabulary to explain fever. During the Enlightenment, the idea of fever became a means to acknowledge the biological experiences that united humans. A century later, in the age of imperialism, it would become a key element of conquest, both an important way of differentiating places and races, and of imposing global expectations of health. Ultimately the concept would split: "fevers" were dangerous and often exotic epidemic diseases, while "fever" remained a curious physiological state, certainly distressing but usually benign. By the end of the twentieth century, that divergence divided the world between a global South profoundly affected by fevers—chiefly malaria—and a North where fever, now merely a symptom, was so medically trivial as to be transformed into a familiar motif of popular culture. A senior historian of science and medicine, Hamlin shares stories from individuals—some eminent, many forgotten—who exemplify aspects of fever: reflections of the fevered, for whom fevers, and especially the vivid hallucinations of delirium, were sometimes transformative; of those who cared for them (nurses and, often, mothers); and of those who sought to explain deadly epidemic outbreaks. Significant also are the arguments of the reformers, for whom fever stood as a proxy for manifold forms of injustice. Broad in scope and sweep, Hamlin’s study is a reflection of how the meanings of diseases continue to shift, affecting not only the identities we create but often also our ability to survive.
A study of the earliest extensive account of Chinese pulse diagnosis, focusing on a biography of Chunyu Yi.
New edition of the most comprehensive Chinese Medicine Obstetrics and Gynecology textbook in the English language World-renowned author and teacher Giovanni Maciocia gives a clear, detailed explanation of the physiology, pathology and aetiology of women's disorders in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and adapts these to Western conditions and patients. Seventy gynecological conditions are discussed in detail with consideration given to differentiation between conditions, the advised treatment using acupuncture and herbs, prevention and prognosis. Guidelines on lifestyle and use of the eight Extraordinary Vessels are provided, with case studies allowing easy application of theory to practice throughout. New for this edition: New attractive two-colour layout with book marks to ease navigation Endometriosis and its treatment now included and fully covered in a new chapter Infertility chapter includes recent research highlighting factors in infertility All prescriptions now removed from the text and attractively presented in three appendices: Patient Remedies, Prescriptions and Three Treasure Remedies "Obstetrics and Gynecology in Chinese Medicine is a paradigmatic work. It is tempered with reverence and innovation, meticulous archival attention and detailed modern clinical insight. When future generations look back at this work...they will find not only knowledge and wisdom but also reasons for inspiration and awe." From the Foreword to the first edition by Ted J. Kaptchuk, Associate Director, Centre for Alternative Medicine Research, Beth Israel Hospital; Instructor in Medicine, Harvard medical School, Boston, USA. • Physiology and pathology of women’s disorders in Chinese medicine • Aetiology and diagnosis of women’s disorders • Differentiation and treatment – including acupuncture, herbs and patent remedies – of 64 gynecological conditions • Prevention and prognosis for each disease • Approximately 100 case histories from the author’s own practice • A detailed discussion of the use of the eight extraordinary vessels in gynecology
This book contains an annotated translation of the largest existing collection of Buddhist miracle texts from China's early medieval period, Wang Yan's Records of Signs from the Unseen Realm, which were compiled around 490 CE.
Covering everything from cryptozoology and the Yeti to witchcraft, earth mysteries, folklore, ghosts, human oddities, the occult, parapsychology, spiritualism, and UFOs, a comprehensive resource looks a wide range of unexplained phenomena in a volume containing more than 1,300 objective, informative, and up-to-date entries.
Acupuncture: Visible Holism provides a theoretical complement to currently available guides to the clinical practice of acupuncture. The author presents the groundbreaking concept of acupuncture as visible holism, as well as an entirely new theory concerning the origins of acupuncture, the identification of the meridians, and the discovery of the acupoints. Also contained in the volume are original interpretations of a number of key aspects of acupuncture, including the Root and Tip theory (ben biao) and its applications, the principles of pattern identification (bian zheng), the importance of the needling sensation (deqi) and how to maximize it, and the necessity of a synergistic relationship between patient and acupuncturist. * What are the origins of acupuncture - are the current theories in need of revision? * What are the essential actions underlying its effectiveness? * Does acupuncture offer a tangible expression of holism (or holistic thought)?

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