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H. P. Lovecraft and Robert E. Howard are two of the titans of weird fiction of their era. Dominating the pages of Weird Tales in the 1920s and 1930s, they have gained worldwide followings for their compelling writings and also for the very different lives they led. The two writers came in touch in 1930, when Howard wrote to Lovecraft via Weird Tales. A rich and vibrant correspondence immediately ensued. Both writers were fascinated with the past, especially the history of Roman and Celtic Britain, and their letters are full of intriguing discussions of contemporary theories on this subject. Gradually, a new discussion came to the fore-a complex dispute over the respective virtues of barbarism and civilisation, the frontier and settled life, and the physical and the mental. Lovecraft, a scion of centuries-old New England, and Howard, a product of recently settled Texas, were diametrically opposed on these and other issues, and each writes compellingly of his beliefs, attitudes, and theories. The result is a dramatic debate-livened by wit, learning, and personal revelation-that is as enthralling as the fiction they were writing at the time. All the letters have been exhaustively annotated by the editors.
The articles in this volume were written in honour of F. A. Hayek and cover the whole scope of his thought. Many of the essays take as a starting point Hayek's own writings. The list of distinguished contributors include: Jacques Rueff, George Halm, Michael Polyani, Gordon Tullock, Günter Schmölders, Friedrich Lutz, Gottfried von Haberler, Frank Paish, Ludwig Lachmann, Peter Bauer, James Buchanan, Fritz Machlup and Karl Popper.
Seminar paper from the year 2011 in the subject American Studies - Literature, University of Copenhagen (American Studies), language: English, abstract: The subject of ‘race throughout American history’ has evolved around has evolved around and run up against innumerable variables. One could choose, for example, to investigate the race issue’s relationship to labor market developments or any other equally important topic. However, due to the nature of the course, American History and Literature, of which this paper marks the ending, it is a natural consequence that this paper seeks to enquire into the race issue from a literary perspective. Again, hundreds of possible approaches present themselves to describe how the race issue has permeated literary history from the adoption of The Declaration of Independence in 1776 until now. This paper will approach literature’s role in the race issue from two primary perspectives, namely that of Frederick Douglass’ slave narrative in his Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, and from that of Herman Melville’s novella Benito Cereno. Rather than an actual textual analysis of the two authors’ works, this paper will use them as tools to provide a glimpse of the nature of the race issue and to show how, in Frederick Douglass’ case for instance, literacy does not equal freedom. The paper will attempt to investigate two separate perspectives of the race issue, namely, to present the living conditions of slaves as well as of liberated slaves in the 19th century through the works of, primarily, Frederick Douglass, but also Harriet Jacobs and to explore the racist mind of the white man through Herman Melville’s Benito Cereno.
Let’s bring up the obvious and deal with it together! We men all run the same race and stumble along the same bumps and potholes; however, we isolate ourselves from one another, pretending everything is OK. Christian men are falling. Many men in our local churches are currently on the fast track toward destruction. Many are trapped in self-made cages, hiding themselves in darkness, hoping no one sees where they really are, and at the same time earnestly desiring for someone to set them free. But we don’t talk about these things. The Church must take drastic measures, but what can we do, and what should we do? Journey to Freedom offers an answer: authentic fellowship. It’s missing among so many Christian men in so many of our churches today. What is authentic fellowship? What does it look like? And where in Scripture can we see it in action? Find out how you can experience biblical, authentic fellowship in your life. Start your journey to freedom right now!
Spinoza rejects fundamental tenets of received morality, including the notions of Providence and free will. Yet he retains rich theories of good and evil, virtue, perfection, and freedom. Building interconnected readings of Spinoza's accounts of imagination, error, and desire, Michael LeBuffe defends a comprehensive interpretation of Spinoza's enlightened vision of human excellence. Spinoza holds that what is fundamental to human morality is the fact that we find things to be good or evil, not what we take those designations to mean. When we come to understand the conditions under which we act-that is, when we come to understand the sorts of beings that we are and the ways in which we interact with things in the world-then we can recast traditional moral notions in ways that help us to attain more of what we find to be valuable. For Spinoza, we find value in greater activity. Two hazards impede the search for value. First, we need to know and acquire the means to be good. In this respect, Spinoza's theory is a great deal like Hobbes's: we strive to be active, and in order to do so we need food, security, health, and other necessary components of a decent life. There is another hazard, however, that is more subtle. On Spinoza's theory of the passions, we can misjudge our own natures and fail to understand the sorts of beings that we really are. So we can misjudge what is good and might even seek ends that are evil. Spinoza's account of human nature is thus much deeper and darker than Hobbes's: we are not well known to ourselves, and the self-knowledge that is the foundation of virtue and freedom is elusive and fragile.
Can psychology and religion engage in constructive dialogue ? Has psychology a contribution to make in Christian formation ? These are some of the issues addressed in this volume, marking 25 years of the Institute of Psychology of the Gregorian University. The twenty articles which make up the work offer essential insights into how psychology and religion can meet and interact constructively, at the level of theory and of practice. These insights are presented in the context of an overall Christian anthropology which continues to develop and to further refine its practical applications. The contributions are divided into four sections - theory and method, dialogue between psychology and other disciplines, applications in different cultures, and concrete experiences of applying a psychologically-informed Christian anthropology in the educational setting. The balanced approach presented in this work makes it both a serious instrument of study and a valuable point of reference for the educator. Its constant reference to a Christian conception of the person will help avoid short-sighted pragmatism.
The primary purpose of Drawn to Freedom is not to understand the Heidelberg Catechism, Eberhard Busch explains, but rather through it to understand what it means for us to believe in the merciful and just triune God. This is our God today, who always was our God, and will be our God tomorrow. This book, then, is a carefully developed, wide-ranging exploration of what it means to be a Christian in today s world. God is so committed to freedom, writes Busch, that he wants to give humans their own freedom. To unfold what this proposition means for Christians, Busch reexamines the Heidelberg Catechism of 1563 from a modern perspective and uses its question-and-answer format to propose an understanding of God s ways that still holds true for the twenty-first century. Busch also invites into the conversation past and present theologians, philosophers, musicians, and scientists with significant questions, objections, and alternative views. He probes such issues as self-understanding, personal worth, sin and forgiveness, hope and despair, and faith and love all in relation to the freedom and deliverance that he believes God desires to afford us.
What does it mean to be free? We invoke the word frequently, yet the freedom of countless Americans is compromised by social inequalities that systematically undercut what they are able to do and to become. If we are to remedy these failures of freedom, we must move beyond the common assumption, prevalent in political theory and American public life, that individual agency is best conceived as a kind of personal sovereignty, or as self-determination or control over one’s actions. In Freedom Beyond Sovereignty, Sharon R. Krause shows that individual agency is best conceived as a non-sovereign experience because our ability to act and affect the world depends on how other people interpret and respond to what we do. The intersubjective character of agency makes it vulnerable to the effects of social inequality, but it is never in a strict sense socially determined. The agency of the oppressed sometimes surprises us with its vitality. Only by understanding the deep dynamics of agency as simultaneously non-sovereign and robust can we remediate the failed freedom of those on the losing end of persistent inequalities and grasp the scope of our own responsibility for social change. Freedom Beyond Sovereignty brings the experiences of the oppressed to the center of political theory and the study of freedom. It fundamentally reconstructs liberal individualism and enables us to see human action, personal responsibility, and the meaning of liberty in a totally new light.
Witness to Freedom is the fifth and final volume in the extraordinary correspondence of "one of the most original and challenging minds of the mid-twentieth century" (John Tracy Ellis, The New York Times Book Review). Dramatic and revealing, these letters deal with periods of serious crisis in Thomas Merton's life and vocation, giving readers, in his own words, the details and behind-the-scene facts of his personal struggles as well as his lifelong commitment to peace. This remarkable collection includes the unpublished "Cold War Letters" (as well as a complete list of the series), with Merton's original preface, which confirms their continuing relevance in the cause of peace. There are letters to ecologist Rachel Carson; artist and type designer Victor Hammer; Merton's friend and agent Naomi Burton Stone; his teacher Mark Van Doren; the Canadian philosopher Leslie Dewart; the French Arabic scholar Louis Massignon; and other famous as well as unknown correspondents. There is a courageous open letter to the American hierarchy on the issue of war. Witness to Freedom shows Merton as a living witness against war, perhaps one of the greatest of our century.
Simple Sabotage Field Manual was authored byby The United States Office of Strategic Services and is a must for any student of strategy and sabotage.
What makes individual freedom valuable? People have always believed in freedom, have sought it, and have sometimes fought and died for it. The belief that it is something to be valued is widespread. But does this belief have a rational foundation? This book examines answers to these questions that are based on the welfare of the person whose freedom is at stake. There are various conceptions of a worthwhile life, a life that is valuable for the person whose life it is. These conceptions will be examined to see whether they are plausible and what their connection, if any, is to freedom. Are they compelling foundations for freedom? Does freedom make a person’s life better or would his/her welfare be advanced by restricting freedom?
The dawning of the third millennium finds many Christian colleges and universities in a search for identity. Coming to grips with the confused, often maligned topic of academic freedom is an essential part of this search. In this volume an unabashed defender of academic freedom offers well-founded advice to an academy that has seemingly lost its way. Drawing on forty years in higher education, including twenty years as president of Calvin College, Anthony Diekema reflects on the extensive scholarly literature on academic freedom against the backdrop of personal experience. He develops the larger philosophical framework necessary for thinking about academic freedom but also offers pointed advice gleaned from specific events and challenges to academic freedom that he has personally confronted. This balanced approach provides a seasoned perspective for those struggling with the subject of academic freedom in their own institutions. In the course of the book Diekema develops a sound working definition of the concept of academic freedom, assesses the threats it faces, acknowledges the significance of worldview in its implementation, and explores the policy implications for its protection and promotion in Christian colleges.
The Perfection of Freedom seeks to respond to the impoverished conventional notion of freedom through a recovery of an understanding rich with possibilities yet all but forgotten in contemporary thought. This understanding, developed in different but complementary ways in the German thinkers Schiller, Schelling, and Hegel, connects freedom, not exclusively with power and possibility, but rather most fundamentally with completion, wholeness, and actuality. What is unique here is specifically the interpretation of freedom in terms of form, whether it be aesthetic form (Schiller), organic form (Schelling), or social form (Hegel). Although this book presents serious criticisms of the three philosophers, it shows that they open up new avenues for reflection on the notion of freedom; avenues that promise to overcome many of the dichotomies that continue to haunt contemporary thought--for example, between freedom and order, freedom and nature, and self and other. The Perfection of Freedom offers not only a significantly new interpretation of Schiller, Schelling, and Hegel, it also proposes a modernity more organically rooted in the ancient and classical Christian worlds.
Varying according to the scope of Hayek's contributions, the papers in this volume include among others: * An affirmation of the "relevance" of Hayek's work * A survey of his contribution to knowledge * An appraisal of Hayek's innovative work on the methodology of the social sciences * A discussion of Hayek's achievements as scholar and mentor The contributors are: Fritz Machlup, Geroge Roche, Arthur Shenfield, Max Hartwell, William Buckley, Gottfried Dietze, Shirley Letwin.
Seyyed Hossein Nasr is University Professor of Islamic Studies at George Washington University. He is the author of Islamic Art and Spirituality, Islamic Life and Thought, and Knowledge and the Sacred; and the co-editor of Expectation of the Millenium: Shi'ism in History, and Shi'ism: Doctrines, Thought, and Spirituality, all published by SUNY Press. He is also the General Editor of the SUNY series in Islam. Nasr was educated at M.I.T. and Harvard and has taught throughout America, Europe, the Middle East, Pakistan, India, Japan, and Australia. The author shows that both Shunryu Suzuki and Kant posit a reciprocally supportive relationship between the development of personal autonomy and the respectful observance of moral rules or precepts, and that both see the practice of a discipline restricting the speculative activity of reason as essential to the attainment of true freedom and moral worth. By cultivating consciousness of freedom through insight into emptiness, the discipline of zazen acts as what Kant calls a "moral ascetic," cultivating a mind and body responsive to universal moral concerns. Olson concludes by showing how Kant's notion of the ultimate end of moral behavior--the highest good--is manifested in the Bodhisattva's vow to work for the salvation of all sentient beings.
Freedom, today perceived simply as a human right, was a continually contested idea in the early modern period. In Freedom and the Construction of Europe an international group of scholars explore the richness, diversity and complexity of thinking about freedom in the shaping of modernity. Volume 2 considers free persons and free states, examining differing views about freedom of thought and action and their relations to conceptions of citizenship. Debates about freedom have been fundamental to the construction of modern Europe, but represent a part of our intellectual heritage that is rarely examined in depth. These volumes provide materials for thinking in fresh ways not merely about the concept of freedom, but how it has come to be understood in our own time.
Do you long for change? Are you tired of going through life feeling defeated and stuck? Do you want to discover your potential and realize your purpose in life? If so then Journey to Freedom is for you. This guide helps you to change the things in your life that keep you from fulfilling your purpose. It offers tools along with an inspiring, practical, and hope-filled vision for permanently changing your spirit, mind, and body. Written by Scott Reall--founder of RESTORE, a life-changing ministry of the YMCA.
In this timely study, Jeffrey C. Goldfarb explores the nature and prospects of cultural freedom by examining the conditions that favor or threaten its development in the political East and West. Goldfarb—who examines conditions in the Soviet Union, the United States, and their respective European allies—focuses most closely upon Poland and the United States. He investigates a wide range of concrete cases, including the Polish opposition movement and Solidarity, the migration of artists, the American television and magazine industries, American philanthropy, and communist cultural conveyor belts. From these cases, Goldfarb derives a definitive set of sociological conditions for cultural freedom: critical creativity which resists systematic constraints, continuity of cultural tradition, and a relatively autonomous public realm for the reception of culture. Cultural freedom, Goldfarb shows, is not a static state but a process of achievement. Its parameters and content are determined by social practice in cultural institutions and by their relations with other components and the totality of social structure. So defined, cultural freedom is transformed from an ideological concept into one with real critical and analytical power. Through it we can appreciate the invisible nature of constraint in the West and the unapparent but acting supports of cultural freedom existing in socialist countries. Most importantly, Goldfarb's conclusions provide a framework for understanding more clearly than before the circumstance of cultural freedom in both East and West so that citizens may utilize their full creative abilities as they address the problems of the present day.

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