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Celtic tradition is at the heart of many aspects of popular modern pagan paths, and this book brings those aspects together to explore the relevance of a 2000-year-old culture in modern-day society. A Modern Celt looks at the Tuatha de Danaan, who they were and their continuing relevance in the 21st century. It looks at several of the key figures and the legends surrounding them, and considers how they relate to real life, everyday events, and the power they can lend us to deal with our own problems. The wheel of the year brings Celtic festivals and a modern calendar together, and these corner posts of the year help us understand the world as something that existed long before humans arrived, and hopefully will continue to exist long after we are gone. A Modern Celt considers some of the things we do to try and preserve it, and how these can be inspired by our Celtic roots. With musings from members of Celtic paths about why they feel such a tie to their Celtic ancestry, A Modern Celt paints a picture of an ancient world, alive and thriving today.
This volume brings together contributions from a range of scholars, not only from the Celtic heartlands, but further afield such as Austria, Canada and Poland. The chapters are based upon a number of presentations on a wide range of Celtic Studies given at a conference in Poznań, Poland, in October 2014. The book, as such, emphasizes the international aspect of the field, and highlights the relatively strong position of Celtic Studies in Poland, through the inclusion of Polish scholars working on Irish and Breton, and by introducing an academic audience to the ‘conversation’ on Celtic matters which was held recently on Polish soil. Celtic Studies are currently undergoing a series of changes with respect to the approaches adopted, and the field is brought into question in this volume with an examination of the notion of Celtoscepticism, which, as pointed out, when tackled in the right way, can breathe new life into the subject and can be viewed as a positive movement. As such, a number of contributions here problematize the changes in thinking of many linguists over the concept of who is a speaker of a Celtic language and how well they speak it, as well as the connection between traditional Celtic cultural practices and the concept of well-being. The volume also provides chapters on Mediaeval Celtic Studies which showcase the work of a number of emerging scholars in the field, who examine various aspects of Celtic textuality in Mediaeval Scotland, Brittany and Wales. Indeed, this book gives voice to a number of early career scholars, placing them carefully alongside more established scholars in the field, in order to show the continuation of established methods of investigation.
This comprehensive volume describes in depth all the Celtic languages from historical, structural and sociolinguistic perspectives, with individual chapters on Irish, Scottish, Gaelic, Manx, Welsh, Breton and Cornish. Organized for ease of reference, The Celtic Languages is arranged in four parts. The first, Historical Aspects, covers the origin and history of the Celtic languages, their spread and retreat, present-day distribution and a sketch of the extant and recently extant languages. Parts II and III describe the structural detail of each language, including phonology, mutation, morphology, syntax, dialectology and lexis. The final part provides wide-ranging sociolinguistic detail, such as areas of usage (in government, church, media, education, business), maintenance (institutional support offered), and prospects for survival (examination of demographic changes and how they affect these languages). Special Features: * Presents the first modern, comprehensive linguistic description of this important language family * Provides a full discussion of the likely progress of Irish, Welsh and Breton * Includes the most recent research on newly discovered Continental Celtic inscriptions
Ancient sources and modern scholars have often represented the Athenian festival of Adonis as a marginal and faintly ridiculous private women's ritual. Seeds were planted each year in pots and, once sprouted, carried to the rooftops, where women lamented the death of Aphrodite's youthful consort Adonis. Laurialan Reitzammer resourcefully examines a wide array of surviving evidence about the Adonia, arguing for its symbolic importance in fifth- and fourth-century Athenian culture as an occasion for gendered commentary on mainstream Athenian practices. Reitzammer uncovers correlations of the Adonia to Athenian wedding rituals and civic funeral oration and provides illuminating evidence that the festival was a significant cultural template for such diverse works as Aristophanes' drama Lysistrata and Plato's dialogue Phaedrus. Her fresh approach is a timely contribution to studies of the ways gender and sexuality intersect with religion and ritual in ancient Greece.
The primary aim of this work is to focus on contemporary issues and to promote interdisciplinary approaches within Celtic studies.
Celtic Identity and the British Image explores the idea of the Celt and definition of the so-called ''Celtic Fringe'' over the last 300 years. It is the only in-depth study of the literary and cultural representation of Ireland, Scotland, and Wales over this period, and is based on an extremely wide-ranging grasp of issues of national identity and state formation. The idea of the Celt and Celticism is once again highly fashionable.
Celtic Geographies questions traditional conceptualizations of Celticity that rely on an homogenous interpretation of what it means to be a Celt in contemporary society. The various contributors break away from these traditional interpretations to critically explore a Celticity that is diverse in character. The book explores a number of themes that are central to historical and contemporary Celticity: * the historical geographies of Celtic peoples * devolution and politics in Celtic regions, such as Wales and Scotland * the commodification of Celticity in the tourism practices of Brittany and Ireland * the role of diaspora in the development of Celtic identities, in both North America and in the west of Scotland * the relationship between Celticity and forms of contemporary culture.
This dramatic history traces the mysterious Celts from their dark origins, including Druids and King Arthur, right across Britain and Europe and looking at their beliefs, cultures and arts as well as their warring and expansion. The resurgence of Celtic identity in Britain and Europe has revitalized interest in Celtic history. At the same time, developments in genetics and archaeology have led to it becoming an arena of serious controversy. John Hayward explores the changing identity of Europe's Celtic speaking peoples through history, both as they saw themselves and as others saw them. Covering continental Europe, Britain and Ireland, and the present day Celtic global diaspora, this is a vibrant and meticulously researched account.
The Quest for the Irish Celt is the fascinating story of Harvard University’s five-year archaeological research programme in Ireland during the 1930s to determine the racial and cultural heritage of the Irish people. The programme involved country-wide excavations and the examination of prehistoric skulls by physical anthropologists, and was complemented by the physical examinations of thousands of Irish people from across the country; measuring skulls, nose-shape and grade of hair colour. The Harvard scientists’ mission was to determine who the Celts were, what was their racial type, and what element in the present-day population represented the descendants of the earliest inhabitants of the island. Though the Harvard Mission was hugely influential, there were theories of eugenics involved that would shock the modern reader. The main adviser for the archaeology was Adolf Mahr, Nazi and Director of the National Museum (1934–39). The overall project was managed by Earnest A. Hooton, famed Harvard anthropologist, whose theories regarding biological heritage would now be readily condemned for their racism. Mairéad Carew explores this extraordinary archaeological mission, examining its historic importance for Ireland and Irish-America, its landmark findings, and the unseemly activities that lay just beneath the surface.
Developed from an early oral storytelling tradition dating back to the dawn of European culture, this is one of the oldest and most vibrant of Europe's mythologies. From all six Celtic cultures - Irish, Scots, Welsh, Cornish, Manx and Breton - Peter Berresford Ellishas included popular myths and legends, as well as bringing to light exciting new tales which have been lying in manuscript form, untranslated and unknown to the modern general reader. The author brings not only his extensive knowledge of source material but also his acclaimed skills of storytelling to produce an original, enthralling and definitive collection of Celtic myths and legends - tales of gods and goddesses, heroes and heroines, magical weapons, fabulous beasts, and entities from the ancient Celtic world.
This beautifully illustrated daily prayer guide, which offers simple outlines for morning and night prayer, draws on the insights of Celtic spirituality to attune us living as God's children in today's world. Original prayers and sensitively chosen Bible texts for meditation enable us to recover what the Celts knew instincively: that God is present throughout his creation and that as human beings, we are made in his image and carry within us the seeds of holiness and the potential of glory.
This resource offers an opportunity to reflect critically on some of the insistent 'othering' that has accompanied much cultural production in and on the Celtic World, and that have prohibited serious critical engagement with what are sometimes described as the 'traditional' and 'folk' music of Europe.

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