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This text argues that justice is a virtue which everyone shares - a function of personal character and not just of government or economic planning. It uses examples from Plato to Ivan Boesky, to document how we live and how we feel.
Yarbrough examines the life and career of Judge J. Waties Waring, a southern segregationist who in 1945 turned civil rights advocate, and assesses the controversy and motivating forces behind this seminal figure in the civil rights movement.
This richly detailed biography illustrates how a determined Canadian seeking justice created an enduring legacy. Through vigorous battles, Jim McRuer’s passion for justice was translated into laws that daily touch and protect the lives of millions today. James Chalmers McRuer was not easy to get along with or even much liked by many lawyers who dubbed him ’Vinegar Jim.’ Yet countless others saw him as heroic, inspirational, a man above and apart from his times. His resolute focus on justice changed the lives of married women with no property rights, children without legal protection, aboriginals caught in the whipsaw of traditional hunting practices and imposed game laws, and prisoners locked away and forgotten. Environmental degradation and those causing it, murderers, stock fraud artists and Cold War spies all came within the ambit of J. C. McRuer’s sharp legal mind and passion for justice. Upon turning 75, McRuer embarked on his most important work of all, becoming Canada’s greatest law reformer and remaining active into his 90s.
A Passion for Justice By: Ralph D. Fertig “Ralph D. Fertig documents origins and episodes in the Civil Rights Movement. He has been a steady and consistent advocate for civil rights through non-violent direct action in most of his 88 years. We met in the 1961 Freedom Rides and in his book, A Passion for Justice, Fertig chronicles struggles for desegregation before, through and since then. In the current political climate, this is a book for today.” -John Lewis, US Congressman Hailed by the Washington Post as the “Conscience of Washington,” and by the Los Angeles Times as “a cog in the wheel of justice,” Ralph D. Fertig began his social activism in his home, filled with German Jewish refugees. In high school and college, he campaigned for desegregation and justice in housing and employment. At the University of Chicago, he fought for academic freedom. He began social work organizing peace between warring street gangs on Chicago’s South side. Fertig organized programs for equal rights with the Congress Of Racial Equality and the Americans for Democratic Action. He became a Freedom Rider on a bus bound for Jackson, Mississippi, to help integrate interstate buses. The Sheriff in Selma, Alabama threw him in jail, where White prisoners kicked in his ribs. While running a community center in Washington, D.C., he organized welfare mothers and public housing tenants. Martin Luther King, Jr. invited him to help mobilize the iconic 1963 March on Washington, and to help lobby for the Civil Rights Act of 1964. He ran the Greater Los Angeles Community Action Agency serving thousands of disadvantaged people, became a civil rights lawyer, and then a Federal Administrative Judge, ruling on cases of employment discrimination. He taught at the USC School of Social Work rising to the level of full professor, and where he is now a professor emeritus. As President of the Humanitarian Law Project, he was a consultant to the United Nations, and challenged restrictions to free speech in the USA PATRIOT Act before the U.S. Supreme Court. Fertig’s earlier book, Love and Liberation, was a Los Angeles Times best seller, praised in its Kirkus review as “a sweeping Jewish love story couched in revolution, and it is written in with an apt power and elegance. The book is a contained epic… An intimate, compassionate work of historical fiction.”
Vernon D Plueckhahn was for many years Australia's most prominent forensic pathologist. His expertise was central in correcting some of Australia's worst miscarriages of justice, most notably the wrongful 1982 conviction of Lindy Chamberlain for murder. This book traces his life, of first serving on a hospital ship for four years in World War II, then becoming a doctor, and then from a small base as the first pathologist at Geelong Hospital becoming known nationally and internationally. He led the way in forensic pathology - in research, for example, to validate autopsy measurement of blood alcohol and then linking alcohol misuse and drowning. He was instrumental in transforming the small regional hospital of Geelong into a leading academic centre. He steered the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia through turbulent times in the 1970s. His achievements were quite remarkable, with the greatest being the formation of the Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine, which is now a world leading institution.
Distinguished philosophers, theologians, and cultural critics provide the first critical consideration of the work of philosopher John D. Caputo. Responses from Caputo are included.

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