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At a turning point in his life, writer Michael Pollan found himself dreaming of a small wood-frame hut in the woods near his house--a place to work, but also a "shelter for daydreams." Weaving the practical with the philosophical, this book presents a captivating personal inquiry into the art of architecture, the craft of building, and the meaning of modern work. Line drawings throughout. Size C. 320 pp. National ads & publicity. 35,000 print.
Years ago, devout Christian Gwendolyn Wilson Diggs thought she’d been forgotten by God. While waiting in line for a life purpose, she felt skipped over. Others members of her musically inclined family sang or played instruments, yet she did nothing. Then, during a particularly dark period, she sat down and screamed, “God, what do you want me to do?” His response: “Spread my Word and proclaim the gospel of Christ.” Diggs’s A Place of My Own to Give God Glory offers forty devotions, each illuminated by scripture and inspired by God. By putting God first and seeking His face, Diggs discovered her true purpose; since then, she has been filled with the joy and peace of Christ, and she seeks to spread His Word to the whole world. She artfully combines life experiences with scripture, turning each devotion into applicable lessons for your Christian walk, with included journal sections for personal reflection. Proverbs tells us, “In all thy ways acknowledge Him, and He shall direct thy paths.” God is waiting for you to walk at His side. These daily devotions will encourage you to view your difficulties from a Christian perspective. All of your questioning will reveal your purpose. God does hear you, and He wants you to hear His voice. All it takes is daily devotion to Him, and never forget the most important thing in life: Give God Glory!
This is a study of family farming in eastern Finland. It looks at the connections between farm and family, and considers the significance of mechanization and other modern developments for the persistence of the family as a farming unit. Here, and in other contexts, the author draws attention to the adaptability of families in a changing world.
Winter 1963: two children have disappeared off the streets of Manchester; the murderous careers of Myra Hindley and Ian Brady have begun. On a freezing day in December, another child goes missing: thirteen-year-old Alison Carter vanishes from her town, an insular community that distrusts the outside world. For the young George Bennett, a newly promoted inspector, it is the beginning of his most difficult and harrowing case: a murder with no body, an investigation with more dead ends and closed faces than he'd have found in the anonymity of the inner city, and an outcome which reverberates through the years. Decades later he finally tells his story to journalist Catherine Heathcote, but just when the book is poised for publication, Bennett unaccountably tries to pull the plug. He has new information which he refuses to divulge, new information that threatens the very foundations of his existence. Catherine is forced to re-investigate the past, with results that turn the world upside down. A Greek tragedy in modern England, Val McDermid's A Place of Execution is a taut psychological thriller that explores, exposes and explodes the border between reality and illusion in a multi-layered narrative that turns expectations on their head and reminds us that what we know is what we do not know. A Place of Execution is winner of the 2000 Los Angeles Times Book Prize and a 2001 Edgar Award Nominee for Best Novel.
Beloved author Sheila Williams beautifully captures the bittersweet humor and vivid adventures of women who survive the worst life can toss at them—and fight back to claim their right to be free, to be themselves, and to live in . . . The courage to change doesn’t come easy. When Opal Sullivan walks out on an abusive husband after fifteen years, she has only her dreams in her pocket. Her new beginning starts in Appalachian River country, where she sees a bit of herself in a graceful but dilapidated house. Like Opal, the house is worn-out and somewhat beaten up, but it still stands proudly and deserves a second chance. So Opal opens her doors—and her heart—to a parade of unforgettable characters. There’s sassy Bette Smith with her cantaloupe-colored hair and four-inch heels; short-tempered Gloria and her devilish son, Troy; the mysterious Dana, who dresses in black and keeps exclusively nocturnal hours; a dog named “Bear” who is afraid of his own shadow; and Jack, who doesn’t mind hanging out with an OBBWA (old black broad with an attitude). It is Jack who helps Opal understand a funny thing about life: You can’t move forward if you keep looking back. . . . From the Trade Paperback edition.

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