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The author comes from a distinguished family in Hong Kong. His father, Yu Wan, was an eminent figure in educational circles both before and after the Second World War. In Part I of this book, there is a detailed description of the unique circumstances under which the author, as a matriculation student, was awarded a government scholarship to enter the University of Hong Kong in 1938. Altogether unpredictably this started a chain of events which landed him in two wartime jobs in China: with British Naval Intelligence and the Chinese Nationalist Army respectively. After the war, he won a Victory Scholarship to further his education at Oxford and finally qualify as a barrister-at-law. He attributes his good fortune to being the seventh child of his father who was himself a seventh child. Hence the title of this book. Part II of this work consists of an accurate separate account of eight actual court cases handled by the author as Defence Counsel. These specially chosen and cleverly captioned cases all make fascinating reading, because each of them carries a distinct flavour of its own ranging from murder trials with an unexpected turn of events and a variety of fraud cases to an intriguing account of an attempt to set up an innocent traffic policeman which was only barely frustrated. The manner in which the defence in each case was conducted is of particular interest.
In this volume, dedicated to the memory of Hong Kong University students, faculty and members of the Court who lost their lives as a result of hostilities in the Far East during 1941-1945, we ask what happened to the University during those years of Japanese occupation when there was only the shell of a campus left standing on Pokfulam Road. Though physically non-existent, the idea of the University persisted, as shown by the recollections here of twenty-five contributors, many of whom were students of faculty when war broke out. Their stories of imprisonment or escape, mainly to China, help to capture something of the spirit of those challenging times that eventually led to the re-establishing of the University in 1948 and its remarkable growth since then.
In Tales from No. 9 Ice House Street, Patrick Yu takes up his story as he returns to Hong Kong to become the first Chinese Crown Counsel. Thereafter he tells of the years in which he established himself as a most successful advocate in private practice. His story is enriched with anecdotes of his legal life and reminiscences of the many people with whom he came into contact. In the second part of the book, he recounts in his lively and intriguing way a series of the court cases in which he was involved as an important member of the Hong Kong Bar. The cases have surprising twists that the defence counsel-cum-storyteller deploys to surprise the reader. There are also unusual topics such as ‘The Case of the Young Man Who Impersonated a Police Officer’, or ‘The Case of the Solicitor Convicted of an Offence Not Known to the Law’. These read like classic detective stories, while also shedding light on life and the law in Hong Kong. Whether telling of his own life, recalling people with whom he came into contact, or telling the legal stories of the second part of this book, Patrick Yu again shows himself to be a notable raconteur and one whose life has provided him with many fascinating stories to tell.
This volume in 15 chapters serves as a useful overview of various significant aspects of the new trends of political participation in Hong Kong. Written by a team of experts who have been astute observers of Hong Kong Politics, the book covers a wide spectrum of topics ranging from a conventional understanding of political participation (e.g., the activities of political parties and interest groups) to a more specialized form of participation (e.g., the relationships between government and legislators in policy-making). The study of the rise of new social movements by the Post-80s generation would be of particular interest to those who are keen to comprehend the sharpening inter-generational differences. There will be a readership among academics and university students. This can also be a valuable reference for the media, policy-makers, or anyone interested in Hong Kong politics. This book is published by City University of Hong Kong Press. 香港城市大學出版社出版。
The Seventh Law of the Prophecy is a collection of book prophesies and the work done from the readers of the great seers of the past and at biblical times. It is not, by any means, proclaiming to be of the great prophets, but there is a message instilled and embedded for the future generations of the world and lessons to be learned from Jesus and God the Father. As the author tells us, “I wrote this book to leave that message of Jesus to the world, and I hope readers will learn from it all. I believe as I have written and hoped that the world has a lesson to be learned from. All of us seek hope and the future isn’t set for us by all means, but we should learn from the past and help the experience change our fate. We all need the Lord in our lives. This is my message of hope in this profane world.”
During the period from 1931 to 1967 -- thirty-six years -- Kentuckians elected only one Republican as governor of the Commonwealth. Yet that man, a former justice of the state's highest court, seldom appears as other than a footnote in the standard histories. That is unfortunate, for Simeon Willis of Ashland made a fine record as governor, assuming the office during World War II and leaving it strengthened in a postwar world. In this new volume in the Public Papers of the Governors of Kentucky series, editor James C. Klotter has assembled 173 documents and public statements, so that the Willis administration may be examined in depth for the first time. Such an examination is long overdue, for Willis sought to accomplish much under difficult circumstances. Hindered by the opposition party's control of the legislature and operating under wartime restrictions, the Willis administration nevertheless made path-breaking moves in education, health care, transportation, and civil rights. Many of the same difficulties Kentucky has faced in more recent years also existed during Willis's term. How he dealt with those puzzles can be instructive for today's citizens and leaders. Willis faced budget problems, sought to increase aid to education, confronted a conflict over the presidency of what is now Morehead State University, and attempted to increase tourism in the state. His calls for change would be echoed by later governors.
Popular American essayist, novelist, and journalist CHARLES DUDLEY WARNER (1829-1900) was renowned for the warmth and intimacy of his writing, which encompassed travelogue, biography and autobiography, fiction, and more, and influenced entire generations of his fellow writers. Here, the prolific writer turned editor for his final grand work, a splendid survey of global literature, classic and modern, and it's not too much to suggest that if his friend and colleague Mark Twain-who stole Warner's quip about how "everybody complains about the weather, but nobody does anything about it"-had assembled this set, it would still be hailed today as one of the great achievements of the book world. Highlights from Volume 19 include: . the poetry of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Thomas Hood, Horace, and Julia Ward Howe . the legend of the Holy Grail . excerpts from Homer's the Iliad and the Odyssey . selections from Victor Hugo's Les Misrables . the science writing of Thomas Henry Huxley . and much, much more.

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